FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Season of Migration to th... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read but remains in clean condition. All pages are intact and the cover is intact. Some minor wear to the spine.
Trade in your item
Get a £1.23
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Season of Migration to the North (Penguin Modern Classics) Paperback – 30 Oct 2003


See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£9.99
£3.83 £3.55

Frequently Bought Together

Season of Migration to the North (Penguin Modern Classics) + Foe + Desdemona (Oberon Modern Plays)
Price For All Three: £27.17

Buy the selected items together


Free One-Day Delivery for six months with Amazon Student


Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics (30 Oct. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141187204
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141187204
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.1 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 10,480 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"An Arabian Nights in reverse; the brilliant student of an earlier generation returns to his Sudanese village; obsessed with the mysterious West and a desire to bite the hand that has half-fed him, has led him to London and the beds of women with similar obsessions about the mysterious East."-The Observer --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Tayeb Salih was born in 1929 in the Northern Province of Sudan but has lived most of his life outside Sudan. He went to University in England before working at the BBC as Head of Drama in the Arabic Service and for UNESCO in Paris and Qatar.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
It was, gentlemen, after a long absence - seven years to be exact, during which time I was studying in Europe - that I returned to my people. Read the first page
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Kiwifunlad on 16 Sept. 2010
Format: Paperback
Set in Sudan c1960, Tayeb Salih's Season of Migration to the North deserves a wider readership. At 130 odd pages it is short but packs a powerful punch for it highlights the contrast between Arab/African and European cultures during the turbulent period of the 1950's and 1960's in Africa.
Mustafa Sa'eed has settled into village life at the age of 50 with a young wife and two boys but little is known about him since his arrival 5 years earlier. The narrator meets Mustafa and discovers that Mustafa had been an unusually gifted young man who had made a dramatic impact in England in the 1920's courted by the aristocrats and intelligentsia. Mustafa took advantage of the loose morals of many English women which contrasts decisively with his new tranquil life with his young Muslim Sudanese wife....but this short novella has a bitter twist to its tale. The narrative draws a rich collection of descriptive pictures from Mustapha's locked room the narrator enters to the amusing elders ribbing each other over their sexual expertise. This book has so many vignettes to savour but an underlying depth which understandably has it classified as a Classic.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By G. Heath on 8 July 2011
Format: Paperback
Season of Migration To The North has famously been described as the Heart of Darkness in reverse, where an African protagonist travels to London inadvertently exploiting and destroying the women he befriends. But it became apparent to me, reading this masterpiece, albeit in English translation, that Tayeb Salih had created something more fantastical than Conrad had done in his original, but arguably flawed novel. Salih plays with temporal linearity, jumping back and fore between Knightsbridge and a small but intensely socially rich Sudanese village on the banks of the river Nile; the identity of the narrator changes, a common device in Arabic literature; the climax to the story is brilliantly hinted at throughout the book, and previewed in a false, or dual, climax, a horrible love murder. Season really bowled me over, and it absorbed me from the moment I started reading it; the peripheral details, descriptions and detours interested me as much as the main plot, which was an unlikely though fascinating concoction. There is a memorable description of an English District Commissioner: [he] "...was a god who had a free hand over an area larger than the whole of the British Isles..." But there is no resentment of the British in Salih's tale; resentment is saved for the Sudanese comprador class, referred to as "nonentities" and "nobodies" by a character in the village. An examination of the complex East-West relationship, an artificial construct, lies at the core of the book, and simple, sweeping judgments are not held by any of the characters. Reading Season of Migration To The North takes the reader on a journey into the enormously complex, psychologically fraught, and deeply emotionally intertwined relationship between coloniser and colonised.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John P. Jones III TOP 500 REVIEWER on 23 Sept. 2011
Format: Paperback
Tayeb Salih concludes his classic work with the subject phrase on the next to last page, and it does capture the essence of this masterful novel. Salih died in 2009; he was Sudanese. This novel concerns the education of two Sudanese in England, over different time periods, and thus tracks Salih's own life. It is an intense and lyrical work, and he conveyed much on the dislocation of people who have been colonized when they attempt to bridge the two cultures; far better, in my opinion, that V.S Naipaul, for example. Unlike many immediate post-colonial works, Salih wrote in his native Arabic. The novel was first published in 1966. The author collaborated with Denys Johnson-Davis to produce this excellent English translation, in 1969. This edition contains a useful introduction by the Moroccan writer, Laila Lalami. In 2001, a panel of Arab writers and critics proclaimed it the most important Arab novel of the 20th Century. I would agree.

Salih skillfully uses a Sudanese narrator, who had studied the works of an "obscure English poet" in London, after World War II, to relate the story of Mustafa Sa'eed, a prodigy who leaves his native Sudanese village, attending school in Cairo first, and then on to England, during the early inter-war period. At one level, he is not a very sympathetic figure, relentlessly using "Orientalist" images of his native land (both jungle, with animals that do not actually exist, alternatively with desert) to seduce a string of susceptible white women. He promotes the "lie" that he lives. There are no "innocent victims" in this book, and the author takes a rather sardonic view of the various women who seek out this "exotic" experience. In his native land, he is proclaimed as the first to marry a white woman. But was it a prize? Or did it lead to his doom?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By K. Fearon on 21 Oct. 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
You could read this novel as a story of a man who became psychopathic and twisted by being taken away from his home and family 'for his own good', and who committed a dreadful crime as a result. We find out what this is early on in the book, so you read it knowing what will happen later on. But it's also about the terrible things that can happen to women when they give up control of their lives, or don't have it in the first place - when men act, or fail to act.

It is beautifully written and the plot is multi-layered and complex. You can read it in an afternoon, but it deserves more time and attention than that.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback