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Searching for the Seventies: The DOCUMERICA Photography Project Hardcover – 27 Mar 2013


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 144 pages
  • Publisher: D Giles Ltd (27 Mar 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1907804153
  • ISBN-13: 978-1907804151
  • Product Dimensions: 24.9 x 1.9 x 28.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,571,819 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

'Together the book and exhibition provide a time-capsule look back on 70s society and culture' --Amy Wolff, Photo District News

'a fascinating reminder of what life was like during these important 10 years' --Noella Ballenger, apogeephoto.com

'a fantastic collection of photographs taken between 1971 and 1977 in the US'. --The Herald Magazine

About the Author

Bruce I. Bustard is a senior curator with the National Archives in Washington, DC. He has been the curator of several major National Archives exhibits including most recently Attachments: Faces and Stories from Americas Gates for which he also wrote the catalogue. He was the lead researcher for Discovering the Civil War, the Archives' exhibit commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Civil War (2010). Bill Ruckelshaus was the first director of the Environmental Protection Agency, and ran the agency during the DOCUMERICA project.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By Robin Benson TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 30 Mar 2013
Format: Hardcover
The ninety-eight photos in the main section of this book were selected from around 20,000 in the National Archives. Originally were taken by seventy photographers commissioned by the Environmental Protection Agency to show the effects of pollution across America. The photos were part of the Documerica project created by the EPA's Giff Hampshire, the Deputy Director of Public affairs at the agency. He had been inspired by Roy Stryker and his FSA photos during the thirties and like Stryker he allowed photographers a broad remit, not just to photograph pollution but to look at the broader picture of American life.

Look through the photos and though the EPA commissioned them probably less than half are directly concerned with the environment. So many are reflections of seventies lifestyle and commonplace USA. Four photographers have sections devoted to their own six photo portfolios: Jack Corn - Appalachia; John White - Chicago; Lyntha Scott - Arizona; Tom Hubbard - Fountain Square, Chicago.

This is an interesting photo take on America during the seventies but the book has a basic editorial flaw in that sixty-seven of the images are landscape and don't really fit into a portrait page. If only the pages had been turned sideways these photos could have been much larger. Also each photo has a rather unnecessary thick black border. Each has a date and place caption and a National Archive reference number. Nicely, many photos have a more detailed description of the content. The front pages have an essay on the Documerica photo project.

>>>LOOK AT SOME INSIDE PAGES by clicking 'customer image' under the cover.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Looking backwards... 30 Mar 2013
By Robin Benson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The ninety-eight photos in the main section of this book were selected from around 20,000 in the National Archives. Originally they were taken by seventy photographers commissioned by the Environmental Protection Agency to show the effects of pollution across America. The photos were part of the Documerica project created by the EPA's Giff Hampshire, the Deputy Director of Public affairs at the agency. He had been inspired by Roy Stryker and his FSA photos during the thirties and like Stryker he allowed photographers a broad remit, not just to photograph pollution but to look at the broader picture of American life.

Look through the photos and though the EPA commissioned them probably less than half are directly concerned with the environment. So many are reflections of seventies lifestyle and commonplace USA. Four photographers have sections devoted to their own six photo portfolios: Jack Corn- Appalachia; John White- Chicago; Lyntha Scott- Arizona; Tom Hubbard- Fountain Square, Chicago.

This is an interesting photo take on America during the seventies but the book has a basic editorial flaw in that sixty-seven of the images are landscape and don't really fit into a portrait page. If only the pages had been turned sideways these photos could have been much larger. Also each photo has a rather unnecessary thick black border. Each has a date and place caption and a National Archive reference number. Nicely, many photos have a more detailed description of the content. The front pages have an essay on the Documerica photo project.
exactly as described 26 Aug 2013
By Jarrod - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
on time, in good form, just as expected.
Great pictures. Didn't enjoy it as much as I thought, but a book of terrific photographs of the period.
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