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Scrawl: Dirty Graphics and Strange Characters Paperback – 22 Nov 2002


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Product details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Booth-Clibborn Editions; First Edition edition (22 Nov. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1861541422
  • ISBN-13: 978-1861541420
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 23.5 x 27.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,074,146 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Synopsis

As the end of the 20th century approaches and a solution to the Y2K conundrum remains elusive, a bunch a dissatisfied image-makers are busy defying the all-encompassing power of the computer. A new generation of artists has come up from the streets, chopped the computer down to size and reconfigured the hand-made. This work provides an international survey of this phenomenon. Inhabiting a genre grey-area somewhere between art, design and illegality, these image-makers and "writers" operate beyond the colleges and galleries of the art establishment. Able to tenaciously exploit the media, they've also gone beyond any previous expectations of anonymous street art. The tradition of graffiti writing, with its notions of youthful rebellion, outsider identity, urban tribalism and aesthetic and technical innovation, was their starting point. The street, the rejeuvenation of comic book artistry and the stylistics, cut-up vocals and rhythms of hip-hop and beat-based music are their inspiration. The music, fashion and marketing industries, along with community-based arts funding, enable these young and mobile individuals to lead double lives.

This is a process-led visual revolution, as aplicable to commercial projects on an international scale as it is to self-initiated personal work. One day may be spent painting a stage backdrop in Tokyo; the next, designing a record sleeve in London.


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 Mar. 2001
In many subcultures Graffiti plays a pretty major part and this book documents its progression from being a kind of inner city folk art through to its infiltration of the graphics industry.Featuring work from well known artists such as Futura and work from not so well known artists, this book is extremely inspiring and you will not be dissapointed.The work featured will soon be imprinted on your memory as it is extremely vibrant and unforgetable.
If you like this book you can not go far wrong by taking a look at the graffiti bibles, 'Subway Art' and 'Spraycan Art' both by Henry Chalfant, they are a testament to some of the greatest pieces ever done, most of which dont exist any more.
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 4 Dec. 1999
You will fall in one of the two catagories of people when you pick this book up. The first catagory of people will say,'Oh, I've got that record, its great, been to that club, going to go go to that club, listens to HIS music, really like that, heard that was really good...'etc. And the other catagory who would not know but wish they did.
'Scrawl' is a collection of artworks mostly by the leading expointents of the new british music scene, or close accociates of them. A fine collection of works by artists not constrained by the limits set by the big record companies, their producers and their marketing study groups.
They test the boundries of graphic design which shows a real understanding of the music they are promoting and packaging, not lest because they are sometimes the one and same people; and the level of expression gives the whole package, be it a record or a club, an expremely high level of coherency. The record doesnt just stop at the music itself but extends it to represent a whole lifestyle. 'Street inspired artists' to quote the book blurb, and we get to see a clear trian of thought of artists from their graffiti to a record sleeve all together which makes this an even more interesting book.
The heavy inclusion of record sleeves, club flyers, promotional material from the likes of Ninja tune and other usual suspects makes this also an interesting snapshot of the dance youth culture, to use a cliche, at the end of this millenium.
The book could benifet on a more fleshed out discussion beyond the one paragrah soundbytes form each individual artists. If it was about words and letters, an intellegent discussion or commisioned essays would go amiss. A fine and beautiful book nethertheless, and I look forward to a sequel in a decade or so.
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