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Scott Of The Antarctic [DVD]


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Product details

  • Actors: John Mills, Diana Churchill, Harold Warrender, Derek Bond, Reginald Beckwith
  • Directors: Charles Frend
  • Writers: Walter Meade, Ivor Montagu, Mary Hayley Bell
  • Format: PAL
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: U
  • Studio: Ealing Studios
  • DVD Release Date: 13 Nov. 2006
  • Run Time: 105 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000I5XNHY
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 8,583 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

John Mills stars in this docu-drama which captures the ill-fated final expedition to the South Pole in 1912 of British explorer Robert Scott .This classic drama highlights the problems which beset the journey and is accompanied by the music of Vaughn Williams.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

65 of 66 people found the following review helpful By Alfietucker on 23 Dec. 2006
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
If you're after a copy of Scott of the Antarctic starring John Mills, with the superb filmscore by Vaughan Williams, this Optimum Classic is the transfer to get. Given the age of the film (released 1948), the colour photography is vibrant, and the sound crisp and clear in this transfer. Don't make the mistake I made of ordering 905 Entertainment's cheaper but very inferior transfer available from Amazon.com (this looks as if it was trasferred from a video copy, with colours washed out - looking rather like coloured-in black and white - and a soundtrack that sounds both muffled and harsh).
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Alfietucker on 29 Dec. 2006
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is a classic film, not least for the superb score by Vaughan Williams. But don't be tempted by the low price to buy this transfer (from 905 Entertainment): the picture quality - fuzzy with the colours washed out - looks as if it's taken from a VHS copy, and the sound is both muffled and harsh (with the first chord of Vaughan Williams' score clipped). You'd be far better off getting the Optimum classic Region 2 transfer, which has vibrant colours and a very acceptable soundtrack.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Kevin William Fox on 31 Mar. 2008
Format: DVD
The company selling this product should be expelled from Amazon. I have never watched a worse quality dvd in my life, and of a film I have seen many times of television and enjoyed. Avoid all business with these cowboys.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 27 April 2001
Format: VHS Tape
Wonderful cinematography, and Vaughan Williams deeply moving "soundtrack" (later incorporated in his Symphony Antarctica) combine to make this sweeping documentary-style epic a memorable movie.
Some of the early sets, before arriving in Antarctica, are a little wobbly, but this just highlights the wondful Antarctic scenery.
I couldn't work out whether the acting was wooden, or whether the director wanted Scott to come over as wooden. Either way, some of the acting seems somewhat dodgy. But the film is over half a century old.
Scotts original diary appears a few times. Scotts famous last diary entry is as poignant in the film as when reading it in Antarctic histories. A spectular movie. For lovers of antartic history, or the natural history of the continent, this film is a must.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Tim Kidner TOP 500 REVIEWER on 27 Mar. 2012
Format: DVD
Whilst more recent documentaries might be more accurate and better told, technically, this just-after-the-war Technicolor British 'Pride' docu-drama is both stirring and patriotic.

With one of the best cinematographers that ever lived behind the camera, the great, late Jack Cardiff, the snowy wastes (actually filmed in Norway) are a far cry from the cheeky, monochromatic East End comedies of other Ealing's.

The much-loved John Mills plays and narrates as Captain Scott, whilst there's rousing support from the familiar faces of Kenneth Moore, John Gregson and James Robertson Justice. The stiff upper lip is never far away as bravely, first Scott rallies for funds to pay for the trip and then undertaking it.

There's humour, comradeship, sadness and glorious spectacle in this and I'm sure the at-times dastardly and enthusiastic playing was more for cinematic appeal than the original trek must have been. When it was originally shown, the film must have seemed like a breath of fresh air, being so different to what was normally in the cinema. Location shooting being expensive, abroad more so and in such a hostile environment, a real achievement.

We all know the outcome but it's the journey getting there and this film, very well made and entertaining to watch, does the memory of Scott and his endeavours, proud.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 11 Oct. 2006
Format: DVD
The Brits love nothing so much as their heroic failures, and Scott of the Antarctic is pretty much the poster boy for Imperial underachievers, thanks in part to the publishing success his very heavily edited diary (none of those crabby bits blaming everyone else for his own mistakes that you'll find in the more recently published unexpurgated version made the initial cut) and a neat bit of mythmaking from J.M. Barrie, who crafted a more noble heroic death for him. Surprisingly, although it doesn't dare to criticize and does play down Scott's awkwardness and snobbery, Ealing's beautifully lensed color epic holds back from deifying him despite acknowledging his undoubted courage, offering a more sober portrait than you might expect. Amundsen is purely an offscreen presence here, despite proffering the sneaking suspicion that he's a bit of a bounder and a cad for getting there first by being competent (not the British way of exploring at all!), and legendary Norwegian Arctic pioneer Nansen only gets a brief look in, but then this is more a film about stoic endurance in the face of `bad luck' (rather than bad leadership, bad decisions and bad planning) than the race for the South Pole. John Mills is surprisingly good casting for Scott, his slight awkwardness with others suggesting he'd done his homework (his gutted reaction to reaching the Pole second is convincingly bitter), and the supporting cast is full of welcome mainstays of the British film industry - Kenneth More, James Robertson Justice (without a beard for once!), Reginald Beckwith et al. Although the integration with the studio work isn't always entirely convincing, the location photography is genuinely staggering and Vaughn Williams score is impressively forlorn.

The extras-free UK DVD is only an okay transfer that could be improved by a remaster but it's significantly better than the US verson
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