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A Scots Quair Paperback – 2 Oct 2006


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Product details

  • Paperback: 696 pages
  • Publisher: Polygon (2 Oct 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 190459882X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1904598824
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 12.7 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 76,282 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

This book may be read with delight the world over. --The New York Times

It would be impossible to overestimate Lewis Grassic Gibbon's importance ... 'A Scots Quair' is a landmark work; it permeates the Scottish literary consciousness and colours all subsequent writing of its kind. --David Kerr Cameron

About the Author

Lewis Grassic Gibbon (James Leslie Mitchell) was one of the finest writers of the twentieth century. Born in Aberdeenshire in 1901, he died at the age of thirty-four. He was a prolific writer of novels, short stories, essays and science fiction, and his writing reflected his wide interest in religion, archaeology, history, politics and science. The Mearns trilogy, 'A Scots Quair', is his most renowned work, and has become a landmark in Scottish literature. Ian Campbell is Professor of Victorian and Scottish Literature at Edinburgh University.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Skeadugenga TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 30 Aug 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Sunset Song is elegaic, describing a way of farming life soon to disappear with the outbreak of the first world war. The characters are vivid and real, no whimsy here - life is hard, but hopeful and sometimes happy and the people are tough and worthy of respect. Chris is the main character and she and Long Rob were my favourites, but its an ensemble piece. Thomas Hardy's "In Time of the Breaking of Nations" kept coming to mind because of the contrast between great events and perpetual cycles, although the continuity that Hardy predicts turns out not to be true.

Cloud Howe and Grey Granite continue to follow Chris' life and that of her son Ewan and I found them equally as good. I don't want to give further details of what happens for fear of spoiling the story, but I felt compelled to find out what happened to the characters and read straight on from Sunset Song. Gibbons is a wonderful writer, both in his characterisation and descriptions. I felt as a 1960s Southerner that the author had conveyed to me a real feeling of what it was like to live in the (fictional) Mearns in the early 20th century.

This trilogy is not an "easy" read, but amply repays any initial effort of becoming familiar with the dialect words (there aren't that many and it impressed my Scottish friends that I knew them:-)

I love these books and highly recommend them.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Shirley Mcharg on 12 Sep 2010
Format: Paperback
This book is great. I read Sunset Song as part of a study for Higher English and became comepletely hooked on Grassic Gibbon. His style was certainly unique and his use of specific techniques certainly reflected the exceptional character that Grassic Gibbon appeared to be. A Scots Quair is a historical record of how living life in rural Scotland once was and how life and landscape changed. How the outlook on the farming community dramatically changed over the years and how realisticly Grassic Gibbon has presented his work which he based on his own struggles. A Scottish journey of sadness and joy, of hardship and triumphs, that is living and as long as the written word is there for all to read, the past will remain in the past but at the same time will always have an influence on the present and evenutally the future. Thank you for sharing the journey Lewis Grassic Gibbon. The sad thing is that Lewis Grassic Gibbon died so young but his legacy lives on and will continue to live on for however long is.
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A monument to true Scottish writing and a shining example of Dorric Scots language,This follows Chris ,Scotland personified,on

a long journey through the Scotland of the early 20th century through the Great War .From the fields of the Mairns to the city of

Edinburgh. A Scotland whose culture has long gone and its language an embarrasment to the grandchildren of those who spoke it

This is a novel of a true Scottish culture for those who want to persue it,a culture and language ,almost dead.
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If I as only reviewing Sunset Song, this would have been a definite 5. Although Cloud Howe and Grey Granite are good reads, they can't challenge the emotion of Sunset Song. The trilogy moves from the country, through the town Into the city, tracking Christ Guthrie's life in the process. Well worth a read, particularly if you have any familiarity with the Mearns.
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One of the greatest set of novels in English (the language), as well as Scottish (the place), literature. Gripping, emotional, and with a heavy dose of political realism, from beginning to end; just utterly wonderful. (Even after reading it several times, it still amazes me that a young man could portray a woman’s feelings and perspective so well, that you begin to question what sex the author really is….)
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i read this book many years ago and remember it was a huge tome - very difficult to balance in bed at night (or during the day)- it is a very good, satisfying read and i recommend it to all
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By Mr P VINE VOICE on 4 Jan 2013
Format: Paperback
I am reading this great book for the third time. It never fails to draw you in and captivate with the skill of the writing, the story-telling, the passion, the sadness and the humour.
It slaps you in the face with the lifestyle it depicts. One of hard work in the face of the changing and developing century. It is full of great characters that will stay with you. Even the smaller characters are memorable. The author, Lewis Grassic Gibbon (real name James Leslie Mitchell) died at only 34 years of age. What a loss.
The BBC dramatised the three parts from Sunset Song in 1976 to Cloud Howe and Grey Granite in the 80s. They cast the wonderful, but sadly under-used Vivien Heilbron as the lead character Chris. Her performance and the dramatisation are truly magnificent. You can get hold of these at: (...)
I got them as a Christmas gift and am nearing the end of Sunset Song as I write. I urge all lovers of the book to get hold of these too.
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