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Schumann: The 4 Symphonies; Overtures Opp.81 "Genoveva" & 115 "Manfred"
 
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Schumann: The 4 Symphonies; Overtures Opp.81 "Genoveva" & 115 "Manfred"

25 Jan 2010 | Format: MP3

5.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 8.97 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
11:29
30
2
6:43
30
3
5:54
30
4
7:07
30
5
11:42
30
6
6:54
30
7
9:20
30
8
9:17
30
9
9:27
Disc 2
30
1
9:48
30
2
6:08
30
3
5:08
30
4
6:03
30
5
6:01
30
6
11:34
30
7
4:50
30
8
5:54
30
9
7:30
30
10
12:05


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 15 Jan 2010
  • Release Date: 15 Jan 2010
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Deutsche Grammophon (DG)
  • Copyright: (C) 2010 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 2:32:54
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00334H1E8
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 26,215 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By I. Giles HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 4 Dec 2012
Format: Audio CD
This appears to be a straight re-issue of the earlier set but at a lower price. My review of the earlier issue follows as a guide to what you might expect without commenting upon further possible re-mastering of the actual sound.

Review of the previous re-issued two disc set of the same content

This set of the Schumann symphonies was made in 1964 and pre-dates the later set made with the Bavarian orchestra with which Kubelik had a close relationship too. On the face of it, as the interpretations are essentially the same, one would expect the later set to win hands down. However, that is to ignore the very fine playing of the BPO.

The BPO in 1964 was very much the crack orchestra honed to that point by Karajan. Inevitably, even when playing for others such as Kubelik as here, that cohesive unity carried through. Kubelik certainly did not aim for the sort of smooth blend that interested Karajan at that time, and the BPO played in a more individual way for him. However, they also retained a corporate unanimity of orchestral response that underpins every climax, every soaring phrase, every answering line and so on. This cannot be underestimated and is what gives, for me the edge to this earlier set. I say this having owned both and finally given the Bavarian set away.

Karajan also made a set with the BPO in 1970 or so and this was well-liked but for me this lacked the personality that Kubelik achieved with the same orchestra in 1964. Also the recorded sound for Kubelik was far fuller than that provided for Karajan which damagingly lacked proper depth of bass.

So I would suggest that this set by Kubelik is certainly not ruled out by the later Bavarian set. However there are also other fine sets which should be considered.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Music fan on 21 Sep 2012
Format: Audio CD
This is an exceptionally fine set of the Schumann symphonies . There is no finer account of the Spring and it was my introduction to the work - it truly is a life enhancing spring in the step account . The other symphonies are equally fine - I have always rather struggled with the Rhenish having got to know it through Karajan's heavy and dreary recording . There is a wonderful freshness about Kubelik's account that makes the work seem not a note too long .

In my opinion , this set is up there with the marvellous pitch perfect Sawallisch and gloriously played and thrilling ( if slightly touched up ) Szell set as the three finest of these symphonies .

A splendid bargain .
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By enthusiast TOP 500 REVIEWER on 9 July 2011
Format: Audio CD
These accounts are often thought to be inferior to Kubelik's deeply poetic accounts with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and, although they are essentially the same interpretations, these with the Berlin PO are less sunny, less filled with life and incident. Kubelik here is more relaxed but he is never dull. Far from it - the symphonies move along with a sureness and inevitability that impresses from the start. Kubelik is a master of pacing and shape. How he does it I don't know - there is no hint of slackness and every sense of purpose. In addition these accounts emit a wonderful glow that suffuses all in a magical light.
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful By JdeS on 19 Feb 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Having been to a live concert where No2 was played, I felt that I needed to know more about his symphonies.
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1 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon on 7 Jun 2012
Format: Audio CD
Schumann is a shopfront of various personae - Florestan, Eusebius and Raro - but there is another: Ovid, the Poet of Shagging. As gladiators-in-the-bedroom go, only Mozart, Liszt and Wagner come anywhere near the composer of the Fantasie with poor old Bruckner being at the other end of the spectrum. Schumann's music is suffused with eroticism. It is ignored or minimised at peril.

Statistically speaking, all conductors are subject to the bell-curve. Kubelik's DG survey of Schumann's symphonies from the Sixties should be assigned to the left-hand rim of the bell: beyond it lies a vacuum where no-one can hear you scream! It's arguably his most vapid recording. When Schumann's symphonies are played with excessive restraint, their phallic potency is neutered. I have yet to hear Kubelik in Wagner (other than the Lohengrin Prelude); if there is a Tristan, I cannot imagine it is a success.

Three of the four symphonies here - the Spring, the Rhenish and the Fourth - are devoid of the panache and orgasmic thrust that Herbie, thrice married, brings to these works - and our Teutonic friend uses the same orchestra not more than a decade later (Schumann: 4 Symphonies). Indeed, this is the Berlin Philharmonic in name alone (Kubelik recalibrates its palette to no vivid end). There is nothing more inspired in the world than the transition into the finale of the D Minor where Schumann "out-wagners" the Master of Bayreuth. Herbie is clearly conversant with the tome "Robert Schumann and the Art of the Infinitesimal Delay"; here, he restrains the Berliners with the slightest of leashes and then lets fly to priapic effect.
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