2 used & new from £34.66

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Schumann: Mass / Requiem für Mignon / Der Rose Pilgerfahrt / Requiem
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Schumann: Mass / Requiem für Mignon / Der Rose Pilgerfahrt / Requiem CD

3 customer reviews

Available from these sellers.
1 new from £38.51 1 used from £34.66

Amazon's Bernhard Klee Store

Visit Amazon's Bernhard Klee Store
for all the music, discussions, and more.

Product details

  • Orchestra: Berliner Philharmoniker, Düsseldorfer Symphoniker
  • Conductor: Bernhard Klee, Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, Wolfgang Sawallisch
  • Audio CD (3 April 2006)
  • SPARS Code: ADD
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: CD
  • Label: EMI
  • ASIN: B000EMSPLU
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 203,390 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. Die Frühlingslüfte bringen (Soprano, Contralto, Women's Chorus)
2. Johannis war gekommen (Tenor, Contralto)
3. Wir tanzen in lieblicher Nacht (Women's Chorus)
4. Und wie sie sangen (Tenor, Fürstin der Elfen, Rose, Women's Chorus)
5. So sangen sie, da dämmert's schon (Tenor, Rose)
6. Bin ein armes Waisenkind (Rose, Marthe)
7. Es war der Rose erster Schmerz (Tenor, Rose, Totengräber)
8. Wie Blätter am Baum (Rose, Totengräber, Contralto, Chorus)
9. Die letzte Scholl' hinunter rollt (Tenor, Rose, Totengräber)
10. Dank, Herr, dir dort im Sternenland (Rose, Women's Chorus)
See all 25 tracks on this disc
Disc: 2
1. I Kyrie
2. II Gloria
3. III Credo
4. IV Offertorium (Tota pulcha es)
5. V Sanctus
6. VI Agnus Dei
7. Requiem aeternam
8. Te decet hymnus
9. Dies irae
10. Liber scriptus proferetur
See all 15 tracks on this disc

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By B. Mason on 2 Aug. 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I was very pleased to obtain this cd set from Amazon at a very good price. I first heard this Radio 3 and found it interesting and mentally filed it in my 'must revisit again' brain cell. I had previously concluded that Schumann is vastly underrated today. The bonus in having the CD is that you can replay until you are familiar with the structure. If you have not heard it before, give it a go.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: MP3 Download
I much enjoyed Bernard O’Hanlon’s amusing and erudite review of this CD, and I am forced to agree with much of it. That is, in respect of the Requiem and the Mass: I suspect Robbie (to adopt O’Hanlon’s delightful approach) felt he ought to ‘do’ a Mass and a Requiem, seeing as everyone else had done one; the only trouble is his didn’t come out as well as Haydn’s and Mozart (et al)’s.

However, I take a very alternative position on the Rose Pilgerfahrt. It was for this piece that I downloaded the MP3 format and I remain delighted with it. I would agree that occasionally the hunting horns are wheeled out for a bit of tally-ho, and there are one or two sections which seem more like Mozart’s musical joke, but I cannot agree it is a dense, uninspired thicket. As a piece overall it cannot compare with his better chamber music – ‘Mein Schoner Stern’, ‘Frauen Lieben …’ and the rest - but one ought not to approach it as though it were chamber music. It is much more in the style of the Spring Symphony, and very much in the mould of ‘Genoveva’ (which has quite a few iffy moments as well as sublime) and ‘Das Paradies und die Peri’. I don’t know who influenced whom, but I feel there is a fair bit of Mendelssohn inserting itself there.

It’s a shame Pilgerfahrt has a few clumsy sections in it (possibly more than a few), but if one is selective one can mine a lot of gold out of it. I know it is wrong, sinful and probably criminal not to take a piece and listen to it as a whole, but as I get older I say, ‘what the hell, you’re only young once’, and pick the best bits. And they are fabulous: try ‘Und wie ein Jahr verronen’ (no 23) for example.

A real curate’s egg with some scrummy bits in it, well worth trying at this price. The soloists are by and large wonderful to listen to (one or two iffy moments but I can let those pass), and the digital remastering of this elderly recording is excellent.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon on 3 April 2012
Format: Audio CD
Drawing upon Plato and St Anselm, if it can be thought of, it must exist. Accordingly, the Oompa Loompas are real and they must require liturgical music in order to glorify their deity. Schumann obligingly stepped up to the plate with his crackpot Mass - a late work.

"Oompa loompa doompadee doo
Gloria in Excelesis Deo
I've got a perfect puzzle for you!"

Whatever made Schumann wander so far from the wellsprings of his genius is beyond me. This setting is foursquare, mechanical and insipid. The composer chugs his way through the texts in a way that brings to mind those diminutive makers of confectionery: loud, soft, loud, soft, loud, soft. Nor does he betray any understanding of the Mass. The only inspired movement is the hushed Sanctus - but we return to the Chocolate Factory with the Pleni Sunt Coeli. I fortified myself with Red Bull to traverse this work.

Clara and Brahms were right to save the Requiem in D Flat from the flames. It is more inspired than the Mass; indeed, the opening Requiem Aeternam is deeply moving as if the Schumann himself is pleading for repose. The closing Benedictus / Agnus Dei brings closure. Even so: if this work were to be submitted by a composition-student, the examiners would say "Not bad at all - and it's impressive in parts." But coming from the composer of Kinderszenen & Davidbundlertanze, it is a letdown.

The Pilgrimage of the Rose is a dense, uninspired thicket that warrants its notoriety. The Requiem for Mignon is the best work here - even so, I would not walk over broken glass to hear it. Fischer-Dieskau marrs the performance with his elocution lesson

These works receive the best possible advocacy here. My god they need it
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
26 of 31 people found the following review helpful
Schumann for Schumann Completists 7 Aug. 2006
By M. C. Passarella - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The EMI Gemini series is more often about convenience and cost savings than about definitive performances of repertoire pieces. Here, we have a case in which the pieces involved, except for "Requiem fur Mignon," are so far outside the standard repertoire that they are difficult to find in any performances, let alone definitive ones. Schumann's "Der Rose Pilgerfahrt" has fared much better on disc than the Mass and Requiem. There are a couple of good recent recordings--one using the original scoring for voices and piano--available. But they are both more expensive, and given the fact that Frubeck de Burgos's performance is a sympathetic one, with first-rate vocal soloists and thoroughly respectable contributions from the chorus and orchestra, I can't see making the extra outlay of capital.

Despite Schumann's literary sophistication, he happened to choose second- or third-rate sources for three of his most ambitious works--"Paradies und die Peri," "Genoveva," and "Der Rose Pilgerfahrt"--resulting in music that is less than top drawer, with the exception of "Paradise und die Peri." As in that work, Schumann in "Rose" used and even advanced his technique of continuous arioso, a way of disposing of the aria-and-recitative arrangement of traditional operas and oratorios. This practice is even more advanced in "Rose," with an added attempt at a continuous flow between individual numbers as well: numbers are linked by held notes, incomplete cadences, and so forth, all of which is interesting to hear the first time around. Despite this forward-looking gesture, however, overall, the piece is a throwback to the fairy world of early Romanticism. There is an obeisance to the Mendelssohn of Midsummer Night's Dream and even to the Weber of Der Freischutz. In fact, one of the male choruses bears a striking resemblance to the hunting chorus from Weber's opera, though nothing in Schumann's work has the energy or spirit of the best of Weber's. Schumann's piece, overall, is a tender, harmless bit of reactionary Romanticism that, for all its charms, fails to make a lasting impression.

At least Schumann was on familiar ground in this exercise in early German Romanticism. In the Mass and Requiem, he was fulfilling what he saw as a duty of the serious composer but without any other compelling motivation that I can hear. The result is two dutiful, mostly forgettable works. Of the two, the Mass seems the more accomplished to me. It has a quiet but restless Kyrie that gives the air of troubled calm. This is followed by a Gloria that seems well wrought to me, even down to the imposing fugal writing. As to the rest, there is a tender Offertorium for soprano, cello solo, and organ that is pure Schumann. Sometimes, it is extracted from the work and presented as a soprano-solo vehicle. The rest of the score is unmemorable. The Hosana and especially the long Credo are four-square and stodgy in Schumann's worst manner. Whereas Schumann could set the words of Eichendorff or Heine with consummate skill, he is entirely baffled by this statement of the Catholic faith.

The Requiem is usually cited for the spooky octave leaps of the Dies Irae. Other than that, the piece leaves even less of an impression than does the Mass. The piece is neither fish nor fowl, falling into the netherworld between the quiet elegy of Faure and the blood-and-thunder apocalypse of Berlioz and Verdi.

After the Requiem, it's refreshing to turn to Schumann's other Requiem, the one for Mignon. This may be Schumann's finest choral work, novel in conception and very successful in execution. Klee's performance is a good one, hampered only by a wobbly Fischer-Dieskau, near the end of his distinguished career. John Eliot Gardiner's performance has the benefit of a finer bass (William Dazeley), the added piquancy of period instruments, as well as the added authenticity of boys' choir, so this is the performance to have, supposing you also want Schumann's "Paradies und die Peri" in a definitive performance.

Some reviewers purport to hear a large difference between the performance of the Mass by Sawallisch and that of the Requiem by Klee; their ears or sensibilities are more finely tuned than mine. Both performances are quite competent and do as much for Schumann as can be done, I think. The digital sound in the Sawallisch and Klee performances is very clean and provides good detail, but it tends to an unnatural brightness. The analog sound in Frubeck's "Rose" is warmer and more rounded, though the recording of the soloists isn't entirely natural; there is a slight halo of reverb around the voices, especially the bass. But this is a small matter. The sound throughout is entirely acceptable. So if you want to complete your collection of Schumann choral music on the cheap, this Gemini set is a reliable way to do so.
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Divine choral works from Robert Schumann 25 Jan. 2011
By Eric S. Kim - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Robert Schumann is mostly known for his piano pieces and his lieder. His choral music is getting close to being fully neglected. People look to either Bach's St. Matthew Passion or Mozart's Requiem or Handel's Messiah to hear the choir and the orchestra together. Schumann's choral works may not be as original as the Messiah, as dark and tragic as the Requiem, nor as structurally perfect as the Passion. But still, they're wonderful works, and they deserve more recognition in the classical music world. Here in this 2-CD set, there are four choral compositions: Requiem, Mass, Requiem fur Mignon, and Der Rose Pilgerfahrt (The Rose's Pilgrimage). Der Rose Pilgerfahrt, the only secular work featured here, tells the story of a simple little rose who wants to live the life of a human being. It's over sixty minutes long, and the story is told through German text. Requiem fur Mignon tells of the death and burial of Mignon, a character from a novel by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. I haven't read the novel, so I can't go into detail on the actual story. Both the Mass and the Requiem feature standard early romantic structures and atmospheres, but they do manage to create an enjoyable experience for the listener. The Requiem in particular is more lightweight than what you would expect in a typical requiem, but it's beautiful enough to give itself a rather divine orchestral/choral sound.

The three conductors (Klee, Sawallisch, and de Burgos) do fine jobs with the scores. Nothing is ever bombastic. Nothing is ever smoothed over. They're very straightforward interpretations, but not to the point that they're almost soulless. There's a lot of heart and spirit that's poured into these interpretations, and there's hardly a dull moment. The Dusseldorf orchestra and choir, as well as the Berliner Philharmoniker, sound marvelous, while the sound quality from EMI is first-rate. If you're into Schumann's music but have never experienced his choral compositions before, then now is the time to purchase this 2-CD set (or the MP3 album, whichever you prefer).

Grade: 9/10
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Pity Schumann didn't realize he was supposed to be entertaining 21st century amateur critics 26 Aug. 2012
By Wayne A. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This is in regard to the recordings of the Op. 147 Mass and the Op. 148 Requiem.

For whatever reasons, late in his career Robert Schumann apparently decided to write a mass and a requiem in the style of Robert Schumann, but not in the style of Robert Schumann's better known piano pieces, his symphonies, or his Scenes from Faust. Haydn, similarly, failed to produce a religious work that included either farting noises, clucking hens, or a raucous "surprise; and Beethoven's Missa Solemnis is noticeably lacking in rural thunderstorms, a four note Fate motif, or a Fur Elise. A Tchaikovsky requiem probably would not have included a celesta, an exciting artillery barrage, or a Dies Irae waltz for grieving holiday treats.

Taken on their own terms--as a Mass and a Requiem written by Robert Schumann--these are fine performances of lovely, straightforward works that bear all the classic fingerprints of Schumann's style, which is a style I've always enjoyed even when it is not overtly entertaining to 21st Century amateur critics. For those who want Robert Schumann religious works that sound like the symphonies or piano pieces I suggest they play recordings of those works, lustily sing along in Pig Latin, and not offer up shabby reviews of Robert Schumann's lesser known works.
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Robbie goes to Rome 12 Jan. 2012
By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Drawing upon Plato and St Anselm, if it can be thought of, it must exist. Accordingly, the Oompa Loompas are real and they must require liturgical music in order to glorify their deity. Schumann obligingly stepped up to the plate with his crackpot Mass - a late work.

"Oompa loompa doompadee doo
Gloria in Excelesis Deo
I've got a perfect puzzle for you!"

Whatever made Schumann wander so far from the wellsprings of his genius is beyond me. This setting is foursquare, mechanical and insipid. The composer chugs his way through the texts in a way that brings to mind those diminutive makers of confectionery: loud, soft, loud, soft, loud, soft. Nor does he betray any understanding of the Mass. The only inspired movement is the hushed Sanctus - but we return to the Chocolate Factory with the Pleni Sunt Coeli. I fortified myself with Red Bull to traverse this work.

Clara and Brahms were right to save the Requiem in D Flat from the flames. It is more inspired than the Mass; indeed, the opening Requiem Aeternam is deeply moving as if the Schumann himself is pleading for repose. The closing Benedictus / Agnus Dei brings closure. Even so: if this work were to be submitted by a composition-student, the examiners would say "Not bad at all - and it's impressive in parts." But coming from the composer of Kinderszenen & Davidbundlertanze, it is a letdown.

The Pilgrimage of the Rose is a dense, uninspired thicket that warrants its notoriety. The Requiem for Mignon is the best work here - even so, I would not walk over broken glass to hear it. Fischer-Dieskau marrs the performance with his elocution lesson

These works receive the best possible advocacy here. My god they need it.
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
I'd Like to Like Them, but Bland is Bland 31 Jan. 2013
By J. R. Trtek - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Poor Robert Schumann gets batted around far more than he deserves, I think. Certainly there have been a volley or two in these reviews, but in the end I don't know that I can't see a point in all of them, both pro and con. These are not awful compositions, but they're not terribly inspired, either. I don't care much for the Mass and the Requiem, though the former's Sanctus-Benedictus movement has a glorious three minutes early on. That, however, is just about it. These works don't appeal to me for much the same reason that the Schubert masses have never lit a fire under me -- there's too much domination by the chorus and not enough extra orchestral texture. Meanwhile, on the other disc the Requiem fur Mignon is pretty much the same story only on a smalle scale, while Der Rose Pilgerfahrt just ambles on and on endlessly for me. I don't believe that these performances make a less compelling case for any other recording you're likely to bump into, and if you want to try to get into them having them all together in one album like this is certainly convenient. Sadly, I've had my shot several times and it's just a no-go.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Feedback