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Schubert: Winterreise Live


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Product details

  • Audio CD (31 May 2004)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Live
  • Label: Decca (UMO)
  • ASIN: B000174LTS
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 30,035 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 1. Gute NachtAlfred Brendel 6:00£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 2. Die WetterfahneAlfred Brendel 1:41£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 3. Gefrorne TränenAlfred Brendel 2:30£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 4. ErstarrungAlfred Brendel 3:00£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 5. Der LindenbaumAlfred Brendel 4:54£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 6. WasserflutAlfred Brendel 4:13£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 7. Auf dem FlusseAlfred Brendel 3:23£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 8. RückblickAlfred Brendel 2:25£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 9. IrrlichtAlfred Brendel 2:49£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 10. RastAlfred Brendel 3:17£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 11. FrühlingstraumAlfred Brendel 4:33£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 12. EinsamkeitAlfred Brendel 2:43£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 13. Die PostAlfred Brendel 2:20£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen14. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 14. Der greise KopfAlfred Brendel 2:51£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen15. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 15. Die KräheAlfred Brendel 2:29£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen16. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 16. Letzte HoffnungAlfred Brendel 2:04£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen17. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 17. Im DorfeAlfred Brendel 2:59£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen18. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 18. Der stürmische MorgenAlfred Brendel0:47£0.39  Buy MP3 
Listen19. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 19. TäuschungAlfred Brendel 1:27£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen20. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 20. Der WegweiserAlfred Brendel 4:24£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen21. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 21. Das WirtshausAlfred Brendel 4:59£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen22. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 22. MutAlfred Brendel 1:16£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen23. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 23. Die NebensonnenAlfred Brendel 2:53£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen24. Schubert: Winterreise, D.911 - 24. Der LeiermannAlfred Brendel 4:49£0.79  Buy MP3 

Product Description

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Bezza on 13 April 2010
Format: Audio CD
I won't dwell on the performances here, as they have been well covered by other reviewers. Suffice to say that they are both excellent, as one might expect, and refreshingly devoid of the mannerism and show-boating of some other well-known contemporary readings. Goerne sings in the Fischer-Dieskau tradition, without aping him; something that clearly attracted Brendel to him, sensing a fellow Romantic who, like Brendel, feels (and conveys) real pain and a rich palette of emotion in this repertoire.

What I do feel the need to comment on, however, is the poems. In the Amazon review, they are described as "literary dross". While Schubert did set his fair share of dross, these poems are not among them, and to underestimate or even to dismiss them would be a mistake. Study them closely, and you will see what attracted Schubert so powerfully. They are full of subtleties and insights; they are also far from the passive, comfortable Romantic essay that others seem to see. Schubert would never have set them with such intense care had he not seem something of intrinsic value in them, and he was right. "Der Leiermann" alone is a poem of great sparseness with an almost modernist sense of dislocation. The more closely you study the score, the clearer it becomes that Schubert saw something in these poems that gave him the opportunity and the artistic space to produce his greatest work in this genre, which is really saying something. So give Müller the credit that is his due, and look a few notches below the surface, as Schubert himself did. There is much there to reward you. And enjoy a splendid reading by two masters of the art.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By William Burn VINE VOICE on 20 Mar 2008
Format: Audio CD
A review in two parts. Part A is for those who don't yet know Schubert's masterpiece, and B is for those who do, and are in the business of choosing a particular recording.

A. "Winterreise" is a song-cycle written by the great Austrian composer Franz Schubert towards the end of his life. The name "song-cycle" can be a little confusing for some people, as it implies that the music begins and ends in the same place. What is the case is that these are narrative works, in which the singer is the main character, and who relates his experiences through a series of songs. In the case of "Winterreise", these songs describe the character's experience of being driven out of his lover's house, and wandering through a frozen landscape. His sanity gradually slips away from him, and he ends up begging from an old hurdy-gurdy player in a village.

The story is, as you can tell, harrowing, in particular because of the momentary glimmers of hope that appear, such as the sound of the post-horn, which the wanderer convinces himself is bringing a letter from his beloved. However, his isolation and abandonment are all too clear to him, and, despite anger and intense longing, he seems at the end to have accepted his fate as one who will forever be cut off from the world.

The music which Schubert uses to tell this story is remarkable both in its simplicity and complexity. He uses one singer, accompanied by a piano, and yet the range of moods and textures which he achieves is itself extraordinary. One can almost see the glitter of leaves at the start of "Der Lindenbaum", and "Der Stuermische Morgen" is as powerful as any orchestral score. What makes these songs so powerful is, though, the intensity of the emotions that run through them: there is no sentimentality here.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By M. A. McCullough on 8 Mar 2009
Format: Audio CD
I came across this recording through watching a BBC documentary on Alfred Brendel. The programme featured the final song "Der Leiermann" (The Hurdy-Gurdy Player") and I found the combination of voice and piano beautifully understated and moving - Brendel and Goerne certainly seem to be partners in this piece rather than soloist and accompanist. Both musicians avoid the stilted sentiment that can be heard in some Schubert recordings and provide a winning performance for the modern listener.

The recording conveys the experience of a live concert and the accompanying booklet contains song texts in both German and English, along with informative notes on the background to the song cycle.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
38 of 39 people found the following review helpful
Buy this now! 15 Mar 2004
By offeck - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
The only things I would have changed are the introductory and concluding applause, at least placing them on separate tracks. Other than that, the audience doesn't once get in the way. As for the performance, it easily trumphs each performer's previous recording -- Matthias Goerne with Graham Johnson, and Alfred Brendel with Dietrich Fischer Dieskau. The sound is very good. There are many moments of very touching intimacy. Quietude, introspection, prayer. Pianism is very good, very well phrased, very well balances. The singing is astonishing. I found myself breathless, nearly in tears -- maybe because this is my favorite song cycle, maybe because Matthias Goerne is my favorite vocalist. Regardless, this is a flawless and very powerful interpretation, to which I'm sure to find myself returning more than any other for quite awhile. I own many recordings of this work (3 Dieskau, 3 Hotter, 2 Prey, Hampson, Bar, Souzay, Vickers, Pears, Quasthoff, Greindl, Schmidt, Patzak, 2 Goerne) and this is my favorite.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
A superb "Winterreise" 15 Nov 2008
By L. Johan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This live 2004 performance of Schubert's "Winterreise" has caused different reactions. In parts of old Europe, it has been hailed as something very special. By contrast, in the US, some reviewers have had great difficulties with Goerne's style, claiming that he rather whispers and shouts instead of actually singing.

Considering the latter opinion, it is clear that Goerne has his own style. But what's the problem with that? One reviewer here at amazon says that Schubert's "Winterreise" has its "greatest impact when sung with unaffected emootional [sic!] directness". Dan Davis at Classicstoday says that Goerne's performance is "still marred by overinterpretation that, while apparently deeply felt, comes off as self-regarding." He also thinks that Goerne occasionally adopts a "quasi-sprechstimme style" in his performance.

Apparently these guys hold the view that there are great restrictions in interpreting Schubert's "Winterreise". You're out of bounds if you dare to do something personal with it.

When I listen to this performance I cannot see that this objection is relevant. Goerne and Brendel is an ideal match, as in the cases of Pears/Britten, Fischer-Dieskau/Moore, and Hotter/Moore. All these recordings make sense to me, in their own ways. Together with Hans Hotter's recording, however, I think this is the most personal and disturbing performance that I have heard - "disturbing" in the sense of moving; that the particular mood of these desolated songs actually is transmitted through the interpretation as such. It is of course possible to sing "Winterreise" with a beautiful tone, more or less ignoring the content of Müller's poems. For example, Fischer-Dieskau often strikes me as more focussed on his beautiful tone than on the bitter moods in the traveller's songs. By contrast, I think that Goerne/Brendel and Hotter/Moore perform this work as it represents its own world to us.

This is a contemporary "Winterreise" for our times. That means that it articulates a performance of Schubert's work that is both representative and highly individualistic. Not even Hotter took it as far as Goerne. This is of course chocking to some people. But it could be seen as perfectly consistent with the work's internal structure.

Sound is fine, audience is mainly quiet, Brendel's playing is superb.

Highly recommended!
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
A romanticized Winterreise that shows off the good and bad in Goerne's approach 9 Mar 2008
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Winterreise is the ultimate challenge to a lieder singer, and this is Goerne's second version in less than a decade. From the outset I had my doubts. Goerne's dreamy, creamy voice is seductively beautiful, but a crushed velvet timbre isn't an asset in Schubert, whose songs make their greatest impact when sung with unaffected emootional directness. Artistically, Goerne favors long, often slow legato lyricism, again not an asset in music that should never sound like swooning salon entertainment. One can set against these deficits the singer's serious commitment to the endangered species of lieder, and his thorough musicality.

The results are mixed. Goerne croons too much for my taste -- he seems at times like a Victorian poet caught between love affairs. On the plus side, the singer doesn't agonizingly overinterpret every word, as does Ian Bostridge. Brendel provides suitably soft-grained accompaniments; there's no doubt about the blend between piano and voice. I yearned for more starkness and raw hurt. Those qualities rarely arrived, so in the end what we have is a quality product that is impeccably polished but rarely moving at the level of Peter Pears and Benjamin Britten in their incomparable account from the Sixties.

P.S. May 2009 -- On relistening, I underestimated Goerne's artistry. This Winterreise deserved four stars, not three.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
A modern classic 13 April 2010
By Bezza - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I won't dwell on the performances here, as they have been well covered by other reviewers. Suffice to say that they are both excellent, as one might expect, and refreshingly devoid of the mannerism and show-boating of some other well-known contemporary readings. Goerne sings in the Fischer-Dieskau tradition, without aping him; something that clearly attracted Brendel to him, sensing a fellow Romantic who, like Brendel, feels (and conveys) real pain and a rich palette of emotion in this repertoire.

What I do feel the need to comment on, however, is the poems. In the Amazon review, they are described as "literary dross". While Schubert did set his fair share of dross, these poems are not among them, and to underestimate or even to dismiss them would be a mistake. Study them closely, and you will see what attracted Schubert so powerfully. They are full of subtleties and insights; they are also far from the passive, comfortable Romantic essay that others seem to see. Schubert would never have set them with such intense care had he not seem something of intrinsic value in them, and he was right. "Der Leiermann" alone is a poem of great sparseness with an almost modernist sense of dislocation. The more closely you study the score, the clearer it becomes that Schubert saw something in these poems that gave him the opportunity and the artistic space to produce his greatest work in this genre, which is really saying something. So give Müller the credit that is his due, and look a few notches below the surface, as Schubert himself did. There is much there to reward you. And enjoy a splendid reading by two masters of the art.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Goerne is an ideal interpretor of 'Winterreise', even if this is not quite at his best. 30 Oct 2013
By Abert - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Winterreise has only one protagonist: a solitary man whose proposal of marriage has been rejected. Its “story” takes place entirely within the mind of this already spurned suitor who is on an inexorable and painfully incremental trek from dejection to despondency to dissolution to death. The piano takes on the role of mirror to the man’s mind, reflecting the emotional territory of its increasingly tormented thoughts. There is no real conflict; the cycle maintains variety by the protagonist’s increasingly ominous interpretations of random imagery he encounters along his bleak, trudging winter’s journey.
From the beginning, performances of these two works have employed different voice-types. Die schöne Müllerin has favored a high voice, often a tenor or lyric baritone of particularly pure intonation. Schubert chose for the work’s premiere the gifted amateur singer Baron Karl von Schönstein, to whom he eventually dedicated the cycle. Contemporary witnesses agree with Schubert’s choice. Since that authoritative precedent, a high lyric voice has most successfully depicted the naive miller boy, with a certain projection of vulnerability appropriate to the role.
By contrast, the first significant protagonist of Winterreise was the operatic baritone Johann Michael Vogl. It was the dramatic voice of Vogl that premiered songs like ‘Die Allmacht’ and ‘Erlkönig’. Though written in a key appropriate for tenor or high baritone, the cycle is often transposed down for a darker voiced singer.
As established in Schubert's Viennese circle of friends in the 1820's, the above division of labor was generally respected for a century and a half. Still, these two seminal works have been an irresistible magnet for singers of all voice types.
An element previously considered essential: a dignified reticence that infuses nobility into the suffering of the two protagonists.
Goerne possesses a hefty middle and lower vocal range that can thunder when called upon. He can also float in doses a uniquely resonant and compelling, if darkish, upper voice and head tone. These qualities serve him well and they are successfully tailored to the rejected and embittered suitor of Schubert’s Winterreise.
In this 2004 Wigmore Hall live performance, however, Goerne was not in peak form – the full-bodied and rich baritone voice requires warming up for most of the First Part of the song cycle, and began to get in form only at No. 8 ‘Ruckblick’, when Goerne’s terrific technique come successfully into play at last. Thereafter, the ever darkening mood of the Song Cycle gradually gains momentum as Goerne and Brendel paint-brushes the protagonist’s inner thoughts with magical colours: Goerne draws a psychological sketch of a manic-depressive wandering soul and generally speaking, Brendel sensitively takes up the task on the pianoforte. The spooky effects of both piano and voice in No. 9 'Irrlicht', the first intimations of death in No. 10 'Rast' are handled to good effect. On the whole, however, Brendel lacks a bit the final emphasis, the final destructive force of lost love and (almost) lost hope in a cold world. In this live recording, Goerne was at his best in the latter numbers, tinged with suspicions of madness. However, in No.11 ‘Fruhlingstraum’, Brendel was rather bland in contrast, leaving Goerne to an almost solo tone-painting stand, even though it could be said that Brendel here was only mirroring Goerne’s stand. This No. 11’s moods swing abruptly from verse to verse, which could for once claim to be an emotional centre of the song cycle. Here, listeners are left to wonder what had brought the narrator from the adolescent bitterness of the beginning to the state he was in at No. 21 ‘Das Wirtshaus’, kneeling in a cemetery and imploring the graves to let him enter. This transition was less clear - as was any sense of another, parallel journey, from naivety to desolate wisdom.
The Second Part of Winterreise starting No. 13 ‘Die Post’ witnesses an increasing close collaboration between the singer and pianist. The lower tessitura preserved Goerne's freshness throughout and left him with enough reserves to handle climactic moments with relative ease, as at the highest reach in the otherworldly No. 15 'Die Krähe', the sensation of death as a faithful friend. In other numbers in the Second Part, the self-realization of rapid aging in No. 14 'Der greise Kopf', the detachment from life and the living of No. 20 'Der Wegweiser', and the almost literal rising of the spirit in the otherwise banal hurdy-gurdy tune of No. 24 'Der Leiermann' all give the listener high hopes for an even better Winterreise in near future by Goerne, if not quite here yet.
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