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Schubert: Winterreise CD

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Frequently Bought Together

Schubert: Winterreise + Schubert: Die Schöne Müllerin op 25 D 795 (1824) + Schubert: Der Wanderer [Florian Boesch, Roger Vignoles] [Hyperion: CDA68010]
Price For All Three: £38.92

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Product details

  • Conductor: None
  • Composer: Franz Schubert
  • Audio CD (26 Sept. 2011)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Onyx
  • ASIN: B005JZ36AC
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 127,962 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Winterreise, D911 - Florian Boesch/Malcolm Martineau

Product Description

Product Description

Florian Boesch, baryton - Malcolm Martineau, piano

Review

Austrian baritone Florian Boesch (below) is the latest and among the most successful to date of the younger generation of lieder singers to tackle Winterreise. With pianist Malcolm Martineau, he gives a notably unnerving performance of what Schubert called his "cycle of terrifying songs", which is often all the more powerful for being so admirably reined-in. Boesch's methodology has often been described as expressionist, though in this instance he's less overtly declamatory than you might expect, singing the work as much off the lines as the text. As with Christopher Maltman's recent, very different Winterreise for Wigmore Hall Live, this is not so much a statement about the inherent loneliness of the human condition, as a study of one man's mental disintegration. But where Maltman's traveller implodes late, Boesch presents us with a slow unravelling of the psyche, as merciless as it is detailed. The hallucinatory quality of his interpretation is matched by a corresponding vividness in Martineau's playing, which uncompromisingly suggests the corrosive impact of the comfortless winter landscape on the protagonist's mind. It makes for very difficult listening, but is unquestionably superb. ***** --Guardian, Thursday 10 November 2011

A fine addition to the discography of this engrossing song cycle. --Musicweb Intl

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ralph Moore TOP 100 REVIEWER on 6 Nov. 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Having been very impressed by his Schubert recital on Naxos, I was hoping for great things from Florian Boesch in this "Winterreise", and I am not disappointed.

The first thing you notice about Boesch's baritone, apart from its obvious intrinsic beauty of tone, is its youthfulness and flexibility, making him ideally suited to depicting a progressively unbalanced lover of morbid sensibility. It is an evenly registered instrument, from its resonant bottom to its ringing top, light and flexible without any graininess or strain. Because it is so malleable, Boesch does not have to resort to any undue barking or percussive emphasis; for the most part he is surprisingly restrained and makes frequent use of a mellow mezza-voce, knowing that he can gun it when required, such as at the end of "Wasserflut".

He is matched by Martin Martineau, the accompanist of choice du jour for Lieder recitalists; his pianism is superb, making most of the impressionistic depictions of swirling leaves, scudding snowdrifts, barking dogs all the other examples of pathetic fallacy employed in Schubert's miraculously detailed and suggestive writing for the piano. Try the sequence of three songs beginning with no. 15, "Die Krähe" which so delicately paints the slow circling of the crows above the despaired protagonist's head, like so many vultures ready to accompany him to his grave. We move to the staccato quavers representative of dropping leaves in "Letze Hoffnung" to the insistent figure on an alternating semitone interval conveying the yapping of guard dogs in "Im Dorfe". The famous, concluding dirge "Der Leiermann", with its 61 bar ostinato hurdy-gurdy drone, works its magic, with both pianist and singer combining to create a mood of hypnotic intensity.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amazon-Kunde on 7 April 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
and of course he was great (even though he had a cold). But Florian Boesch's performance has more artistic depth. He has in my opinion more understanding of the underlying emotions of Schubert's music. This is a truly great recording by two unrivalled artists.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Less is more 6 Nov. 2012
By Ralph Moore - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Having been very impressed by his Schubert recital on Naxos, I was hoping for great things from Florian Boesch in this "Winterreise", and I am not disappointed.

The first thing you notice about Boesch's baritone, apart from its obvious intrinsic beauty of tone, is its youthfulness and flexibility, making him ideally suited to depicting a progressively unbalanced lover of morbid sensibility. It is an evenly registered instrument, from its resonant bottom to its ringing top, light and flexible without any graininess or strain. Because it is so malleable, Boesch does not have to resort to any undue barking or percussive emphasis; for the most part he is surprisingly restrained and makes frequent use of a mellow mezza-voce, knowing that he can gun it when required, such as at the end of "Wasserflut".

He is matched by Martin Martineau, the accompanist of choice du jour for Lieder recitalists; his pianism is superb, making most of the impressionistic depictions of swirling leaves, scudding snowdrifts, barking dogs all the other examples of pathetic fallacy employed in Schubert's miraculously detailed and suggestive writing for the piano. Try the sequence of three songs beginning with no. 15, "Die Krähe" which so delicately paints the slow circling of the crows above the despaired protagonist's head, like so many vultures ready to accompany him to his grave. We move to the staccato quavers representative of dropping leaves in "Letze Hoffnung" to the insistent figure on an alternating semitone interval conveying the yapping of guard dogs in "Im Dorfe". The famous, concluding dirge "Der Leiermann", with its 61 bar ostinato hurdy-gurdy drone, works its magic, with both pianist and singer combining to create a mood of hypnotic intensity.

Boesch, who is Austrian, has the kind of baritone I find most pleasing on the ear and best suited to the demands of these songs, more in the mode of Simon Keenlyside and bass-baritone Thomas Quasthoff, with a keen, sharp, resonant edge and no woolliness or tight throatiness beloved of the fans of too many modern German singers. He is a Lieder singer in the fine tradition of Husch and Schlusnus, not...well, supply your own names.

This is a modern "Winterreise" which takes its place for me alongside those recordings by Jorma Hynninen and Thomas Allen: subtle, sensitive and always easy on the ear without ever either prettifying or caricaturing this extraordinary music, which transmutes mental breakdown into an eerily seductive threnody.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Although lighter and quieter than many, Boesch's "Winterreise" is very successful 2 Jun. 2012
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
With the passing of Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau earlier this month, it's only natural to look at his descendants. Almost every German baritone with an interest in lieder singing was either taught by F-D or came under his influence. There is no heir apparent if we measure by F-D's eminence and the fact that he was before the public for over three decades. Which native-speaking baritone wants to compete with the eight - or is it twelve? - versions of "Winterreise" that Fischer-Dieskau recorded? Here we get the Austrian singer, Florian Boesch, who has steadily increased in stature, and he delivers a "Winterreise" that is very far from being like his great predecessor's. No barking, no shooting out consonants like a nail gun, and hardly a raised voice except for the most spare use of forte in climaxes.

Boesch has a lower voice than F-D's, so he resorts to the keys that Hans Hotter, a bass, used in his historic EMI recording. Hotter's voice was a gliding river of rich sound. boesch's is more accented and flexible, easier to maneuver. He can whisper and make quick transitions of mood. Yet essentially his style is straightforward. There is no attempt to paint a tragic canvas with the entire cycle, as Thomas quasthoff does. Instead, each song resides on about the same level of quiet, resigned melancholy. This sounds a little boring, but Boesch is sensitive at phrasing, and he has thought through each line, which allows him to focus on the poetry, making small points with every word (and avoiding the over-emphasis and didactic underlining that F-D was often guilty of).

The overall experience of this Winterreise is dramatic and involving but not cathartic. In part this is due to the accompaniment, for Malcolm Martineau, adept as he is, adapts the piano part to Boesch's quietism. That's a virtue, of course, and the supple blending between singer and accompanist is lovely. I suppose the high Romantic way of singing Winterreise, although it survives with more strenuous singers like Mark Padmore and Mathias Goerne, here is giving way to a less wrenching viewpoint. For its musicality and care, Boesch's version ranks among the best that I've come across in several years.
Deep and dark and mysteriously like a Friedrich painting 23 Mar. 2015
By John L. Simons - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Magnificent. Deep and dark and mysteriously like a Friedrich painting. Pain is beauty, beauty is pain.
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
this is the most excellent Winterreise that I have heard in my life 24 Feb. 2015
By Loek Koop - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
this is the most excellent Winterreise that I have heard in my life, Florian Boesch is just superbe, contained, super!
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