Quantity:1

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£19.79
& FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Sold by: Fulfillment Express
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Schubert: Der Wanderer [Florian Boesch, Roger Vignoles] [Hyperion: CDA68010]


Price: £11.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
27 new from £8.94 1 used from £15.46

Frequently Bought Together

Schubert: Der Wanderer [Florian Boesch, Roger Vignoles] [Hyperion: CDA68010] + Schubert: Die Schöne Müllerin op 25 D 795 (1824) + Loewe: Songs & Ballads
Price For All Three: £37.36

Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Conductor: None
  • Composer: Franz Schubert
  • Audio CD (3 Feb 2014)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Hyperion
  • ASIN: B00GY73B04
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 73,637 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Der Wanderer D489 D493 [5'23]
2. Der Wanderer D649 [2'24]
3. Der Wanderer an den Mond D870 [2'25]
4. Aus Heliopolis I D753 [3'09]
5. Aus Heliopolis II D754 [2'14]
6. Auf der Donau D553 [2'56]
7. Auf der Bruck D853 [3'32]
8. Der Schiffer D536 [2'03]
9. Das Heimweh D456 [2'55]
10. Der Kreuzzug D932 [2'45]
11. Abschied D475 [5'07]
12. Wandrers Nachtlied I D224 [1'43]
13. Wandrers Nachtlied II D768 [2'02]
14. Herbst D945 [3'46]
15. Meeres Stille D216 [2'23]
16. Der Pilgrim D794 [4'38]
17. Die Götter Griechenlands D677 [4'24]
18. Im Walde Waldesnacht D708 [6'53]
19. Lied Die Mutter Erde D788 [4'03]

Product Description

Product Description

Florian Boesch and Roger Vignoles were shortlisted for a BBC Music Magazine award for their first Hyperion album (Loewe Songs and Ballads). Boesch's warm, sensuously attractive baritone voice, first-rate diction and remarkable acting ability were enthusiastically praised. Now the duo turn to a selection of Schubert's Lieder from the dark heart of the repertoire.

'Dort, wo du nicht bist, dort ist das Glück!' ('There, where you are not, is happiness!')'Und das Dort ist niemals hier!' ('and the There is never here!'). The final lines of Der Wanderer (track 1) and Der Pilgrim (track 16) encapsulate a recurrent theme of German Romantic art: that of the rootless outsider. It is the world of Goethe's mysterious Harper and Mignon, and of the solitary, silhouetted figures in the darker landscapes of Caspar David Friedrich. In music it found its supreme expression, not only in Schubert's Winterreise but in these many individual 'wandering' songs: some grimly resigned, some serenely contemplative, others imbued with a sense of physical and spiritual isolation and longing for an ultimately unattainable 'otherness'.

Review

Florian Boesch and Roger Vignoles' new album examines ideas of wandering and travel as metaphors for existential isolation in Schubert's songs. The task they've set themselves isn't particularly easy. The focus on a single imagistic strand brings with it the potential for an awkward sameness of mood, a danger avoided by the immense subtlety both performers bring to their material. The programme opens, as one might expect, with the restless Romanticism of Der Wanderer and closes with the world-weary resignation of the comparatively unfamiliar Die Mutter Erde. In between comes an extended exercise in melancholy, broken by flashes of wit (Der Wanderer an den Mond), exaltation (Im Walde) and defiance (Der Schiffer). Boesch's singing is faultless: he's in fine voice and marvellously alert to every verbal nuance, without ever fracturing the line for the sake of the text. Vignoles, playing some of Schubert's most taxing accompaniments, tirelessly matches his every emotional shift. Very fine. ***** --Guardian, 13/2/14

Hot on the heels of his revelatory account of Die schöne Müllerin, this fine new collection of Schubert songs from the Austrian baritone Florian Boesch offers a typically searching tour d'horizon around the ubiquitous Romantic theme of 'the wanderer'. By contrast with the Müllerin cycle, however, and its opening celebration of the joys of wandering, these 19 songs (including both rarities and recital regulars) are mostly about its regrets and sorrows, the most popular travel destination being the grave. The prevailing tone of existential angst and despair finds Boesch thoroughly in his element, brilliantly accompanied at every turn by Roger Vignoles at the piano. As Boesch showed in Die schöne Müllerin, he is particularly good at sustaining moods of rapt introspection or numbed torpor, inflating even a whisper with the full resonance of his rich, vibrant tone. With his perfect diction and intense dramatic manner, he s also a past master at delivering such killer last lines as 'joy is all around, yet I am alone', 'there, where you are not, lies happiness' or 'the "there" is never here', while the aching despair he brings to the oft-repeated 'Fair world, where are you?', at the close of 'The Gods of Greece', is utterly heart-stopping in its hopelessness. ***** --Sinfini Music 4/3/14

Florian Boesch is the kind of baritone who, once heard, makes you want to hear him in any and all repertoire appropriate to his voice. --Gramophone, March '14

This fine disc, pervaded with sadness though it is, has a great deal to offer those who love Schubert's songs --IRR, Mar'14

Florian Boesch is the kind of baritone who, once heard, makes you want to hear him in any and all repertoire appropriate to his voice. --Gramophone, March '14

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Ralph Moore TOP 50 REVIEWER on 9 Mar 2014
Format: Audio CD
This is the fourth Schubert recital album by Florian Boesch that I have enjoyed; the others are his already celebrated accounts of "Winterreise" and "Die Schöne Müllerin" on the Onyx label and a collection for Naxos called "Romantic Poets, Vol.4". I have by now the same high expectation for any new recital from him as I do for Jonas Kaufmann's work and this Hyperion anthology conforms to that prospect, being excellent in every way.

Using Caspar David Friedrich's painting "The Wanderer Above the Sea of Mist" (1818) is now almost a cover cliché, it has graced so many recordings of Romantic music, so much so that Jonas Kaufmann is pictured in a costumed, Photoshopped pastiche of the same pose on one of his recital albums for Decca, but it is entirely appropriate here, in this carefully assembled collection of Schubert's Lieder on the theme of the loneliness, isolation and, of course, the wandering of the outsider.

This inevitably makes for a rather sombre, melancholy mood throughout this 65 minutes; not many of these songs will necessarily be familiar to the casual lover of Schubert's Lieder, indeed I can imagine some will know only "Der Wanderer an den Mond" here taken at a very subtle and moderate pace rather than the game plod we too often hear, as if the protagonist were dancing through mud. I count myself a moderately enthusiastic student of Schubert's vocal oeuvre but I have heard or own probably only half of his songs and this disc acquainted me with half a dozen I had not previously encountered. So, for all its beauties, this is no jolly "Best of" collection including "Die Forelle" but rather a serious, scholarly assembly more often black-browed and thought-provoking rather than charming.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is a beautifully sung 'Wanderer' collection of Schubert songs. Florian Boesch has a warm, gentle, mellow voice that is almost comforting to listen to. On my first journey through this CD I began to wonder whether he could also produce a stronger, more assertive sound, as it was becoming a little passive in style. I needn't have worried. In track 5 (Aus Heliopolis) and track 7 (Auf der Bruck) particularly, we get a much more powerful voice. Boesch proves to be a sensitive interpreter of words and differing moods in these settings of verses by a variety of writers: Schmidt, von Schlegel, Seidl, Mayrhofer, Schulze, Theodor Hell, von Leitner, Goethe and Schiller. The diction is clear on all the tracks and the piano accompaniment from Roger Vignoles is sympathetic and supportive throughout. This is an excellent CD from Hyperion and a pleasure to listen to. I feel it will be a CD to return to often and glean new things from each time.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Paul Dalton on 31 May 2014
Format: Audio CD
Hyperion ALAC 16-bit 44.1 KHZ £7.99.ALAC-24 bit 88.2 KHZ £12.00 Studio Master.This is excellent value from Hyperion.Great music company to deal with.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Indispensable 9 Mar 2014
By Ralph Moore - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This is the fourth Schubert recital album by Florian Boesch that I have enjoyed; the others are his already celebrated accounts of "Winterreise" and "Die Schöne Müllerin" on the Onyx label and a collection for Naxos called "Romantic Poets, Vol.4". I have by now the same high expectation for any new recital from him as I do for Jonas Kaufmann's work and this Hyperion anthology conforms to that prospect, being excellent in every way.

Using Caspar David Friedrich's painting "The Wanderer Above the Sea of Mist" (1818) is now almost a cover cliché, it has graced so many recordings of Romantic music, so much so that Jonas Kaufmann is pictured in a costumed, Photoshopped pastiche of the same pose on one of his recital albums for Decca, but it is entirely appropriate here, in this carefully assembled collection of Schubert's Lieder on the theme of the loneliness, isolation and, of course, the wandering of the outsider.

This inevitably makes for a rather sombre, melancholy mood throughout this 65 minutes; not many of these songs will necessarily be familiar to the casual lover of Schubert's Lieder, indeed I can imagine some will know only "Der Wanderer an den Mond" here taken at a very subtle and moderate pace rather than the game plod we too often hear, as if the protagonist were dancing through mud. I count myself a moderately enthusiastic student of Schubert's vocal oeuvre but I have heard or own probably only half of his songs and this disc acquainted me with half a dozen I had not previously encountered. So, for all its beauties, this is no jolly "Best of" collection including "Die Forelle" but rather a serious, scholarly assembly more often black-browed and thought-provoking rather than charming.

The solemn, even dour, ambience is established immediately with Roger Vignoles using the pedalling to open up the deepest resonances of the piano in "Der Wanderer D489" and we are often in the same territory as "Winterreise" without much light relief - although a yearningly lovely song like "Das Heimweh" does much to redress the balance, as do the two tender and reposeful "Wandrers Nachtlied" songs.

What a beautiful voice this is, entirely even throughout its wide tessitura from an echt bass low D on "Glück" at the end of the first song to the lightest touch at the top of its range. Boesch thus sound first like a bass then a lyric baritone in the second verse without any sense of an incongruous grafting of one vocal mode onto another. He often sings pianissimo without crooning, such as at the conclusion of "Auf der Bruck". His diction is invariably pellucid without mannerisms. Vignoles matches his singer with his elegant touch yet sometimes the contrasting moods between the ending of on song and the start of another can be almost shocking, as in the transition between "Aus `Heliopolis' II" and "Auf der Donau". Boesch has the ability to vary his tone and dynamics to a remarkably degree. In this and in the intense, personal nature of his communication of the burden of a song he reminds me of the young Bryn Terfel. There is a mesmeric concentration to his delivery of "Meeres Stille", which ends on a suspended thread of sound, perfectly mirroring the utter stillness of the sea.

Nothing in this partnership is over-stated; pianist and singer move as one, from the haunting chill of "Herbst" - understandably a favourite of Brahms - to the resolute marching chorale of "Der Pilger" to the rising panic which pervades "Im Walde `Waldesnacht'", so reminiscent of "Der Erlkönig".

A German-English libretto and fine notes by Richard Wigmore are provided in the booklet.

All lovers of the Schubertian Lied will want to own this, yet another indispensable recital from a Lieder singer who is, in my estimation, alongside Kaufmann the finest before the public today.

[This review also posted on the MusicWeb International website]
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A reflective, often melancholy program by a dedicated lieder singer who always pleases 21 April 2014
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
When Naxos undertook their complete Schubert lieder series, only a few singers they chose emerged to have major careers, and the Austrian Baritone florian Boesch is probably the best. The lead reviewer's enthusiasm may be a little over the top (I'm not aware that boesch's previous Schubert CDs were "celebrated"), but there aren't many dedicated lieder singers today, with far fewer recitals on the landscape and ever fewer recordings. We aren't living in the era of Fischer-Dieskau anymore. I think this new CD is a bit melancholy in tone, and some of the tempos are slower than usual, but Boesch has matured to the point that he can be spoken of in the same breath with German lieder singers like Christian Gerhaher and Wolfgang Holzmair - to stick with the baritones - but not quite at the heights of Thomas Quasthoff and Matthias Goerne.

the program features a number of "wandering" songs besides the ones that have Wanderer in the title, and these bring out the best in Boesch's pleasing tone and easy delivery. In some ways he's the most nonchalant Schubert singer I can recall. The voice has a deeper reach than the usual lighter baritones in the Fischer-Dieskau tradition, which works well in a song like Der Wanderer D. 489, and it's nice that the very next song, Der Wanderer D. 649, shows off his higher range. The last of Schubert's song output is very familiar in the grouping - not a real cycle - titled Schwanengesang, but Der Kreuzzug (The Crusade) D. 932 and Herbst (Autumn) D. 945 are rarities. the simple hymn-like character of the former belongs with other reverent songs here like Der Pilgrim D. 794. Also notable is Boesch's dignified singing of the two Goethe poems titled Wanderers Nachtlied.

Roger Vignobles is an excellent accompanist, understating his role here a little, perhaps in keeping with the singer's reflective mood. There are few fast songs, which is a shame, since Schubert's light-hearted innocence is one of his most endearing traits. The recorded sound is very good; I was only bothered by the buzzing bass of the piano at loud volumes.

Der Wanderer, D493
Der Wanderer, D489
Der Wanderer, D649 (Friedrich von Schlegel)
Der Wanderer an den Mond D870 (Seidl)
Aus 'Heliopolis' - I D753 (Mayrhofer)
Aus 'Heliopolis' - II D754 (Mayrhofer)
Auf der Donau, D553 (Mayrhofer)
Auf der Bruck, D853
Der Schiffer, D536 (Mayrhofer)
Das Heimweh, D456 (Winkler)
Der Kreuzzug D932 (Leitner)
Abschied D475 (Mayrhofer)
Wandrers Nachtlied I 'Der du von dem Himmel bist', D224
Wandrers Nachtlied II 'Über allen Gipfeln ist Ruh', D768
Herbst, D945
Meeres Stille, D216, Op. 3 No. 2 (Goethe)
Der Pilgrim, D794 (Schiller)
Die Gotter Griechenlands D677 (Schiller)
Im Walde D708
Die Mutter Erde, D788 (Stolberg)
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
An excellent "Wanderer" 20 May 2014
By J. L. Carr - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
While Boesch does not have the most beautiful voice of all the recordings of this I have, his musicianship and interpretation are wonderful. And Vignole's accompaniment is among the best. SOund is excellent and very natural. Highly recommended
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback