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Schubert - Sonatas Nos. 19 and 14 (Paul Lewis) CD


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£7.06 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Paul Lewis
(Piano)
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"And the listener must wait, out of respect to this marvelous partnership of Mark Padmore and Paul Lewis, until time can be taken for it alone and uninterrupted, to accompany them on the journey through to its unearthly end."

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Frequently Bought Together

Schubert - Sonatas Nos. 19 and 14 (Paul Lewis) + Schubert - Piano Sonatas D959 and D960 + Schubert: Piano Sonatas, Impromptus (Paul Lewis)
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Product details

  • Audio CD (28 July 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Harmonia Mundi
  • ASIN: B0017TZ90E
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 144,043 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Allegro
2. Adagio
3. Menuetto
4. Allegro
5. Allegro Giusto
6. Andante - Allegretto Tranquillo - Andante
7. Allegro Vivace

Product Description

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Kare on 8 Aug. 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This recording of two of Schubert's piano sonatas, Nos. 14 in A minor, D.784 & 19 in C minor, D.958 by Paul Lewis from 2001 is one of the best piano albums I've ever heard. Lewis' phrasing is excellent, he plays in a way that makes one feel like his interpretation is the only correct one.
The touch and tone of Lewis is as good as just about any pianist's today. He plays the quieter passages most beautifully, not overusing pedal. The louder notes are powerful, but Lewis never bangs the keyboard.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Schubert is a fantastic composer - for the piano - among the best - Lewis i pianist alongside many top performers - I really like this CD - compared to many others witrh other outstanding pianists - Brendel is a favourite - alongside with Gould and Andsnes - if the have recorded theese sonats I can't really know - but my point remains the same !
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful By DR E J CLAY on 19 Jan. 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Schubert Sonatas 19 & 14: an excellent first recording by Paul Lewis is reissued and tt is strongly recommended complementing other great artists.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
Deeply searching and revelatory Schubert 3 Sept. 2008
By David J. Friedlander - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Paul Lewis is a rising star among the newer generation of pianists. His growing fame is earned by his artistry and depth of vision. Contrast this to Lang Lang who has exploded on the scene amid hype, self indulgence, self conscious playing and gyrating posturing that is all staged to aggrandize the performer. Lewis is the antithesis of this superficiality and "me first" approach to music making. He is a pure artist with heart, mind, technique and expression all in wonderful balance.

The opening work on the disc, the c minor sonata D 958 has strong echoes of Beethoven. Schubert, along with his contemporaries were all very aware of Beethoven's stature. He reigned supreme in Vienna in the time before Schubert wrote this, his 3rd last sonata. How much pure Schubert exists in this work? That question is one I can't answer but Lewis is not confused by it. He finds a great path through this difficult piece and his ability to visualize the entirety of the work is clear in the way he never allows the music to wander. Only the very best pianists can execute technically difficult passages without calling attention to themselves. "Look what I did." or "Look what I can do." You never get a sense of that mistake with Paul Lewis. He is here to make music. He is here to show us the jewels. He doesn't overly polish them, or put them in a distracting setting, or find a way to blind us by reflecting a distracting light from it. He only says, "look at this beautiful jewel." "Look at all the different sides, the depth of it, the flaws and the totality of it. It is unique from all other jewels. Let me show you how this is so..."

The 2nd sonata is a perfect illustration and microcosm of the greatness of Paul Lewis' musicianship. He plays the amorphous and wistful chordal opening with an understanding heretofore yet undiscovered. Schubert's idea unfolds over an unusually long time frame and Lewis has the entirety of it completely unified under his gentle yet firm control. "Rachmaninov!" is what my brain exclaimed in surprise. Did anyone before realize the famous Russian's style was born in the 1820's? Who before Lewis found this interpretive byway? No one I'm aware of.

We sometimes hear the concept of "unselfconsciousness" in pianistic interpretative criticism. I take it to mean basically that the performer gets out of the way of the composer's voice and acts purely as a vessel for it to be realized. I don't know if that is even possible, yet Lewis embodies it as much as anyone I've heard. He certainly brings out Schubert's voice here in this sonata and we hear many inflections and variations, all with great clarity and sympathy. Schubert's special brand of wistful meloncholy has been explored very well in the past by a galaxy of the best Classical and Romantic period pianists. Kempff, Schiff, Brendel, Unchida, Andsnes and Kovacevich are a few well known Schubertians who have revealed Schubert with great success. I have no doubt about Lewis being placed with those greats.

Finally, the price of this CD is rediculously low. It is a super bargain. Anyone who loves Schubert needs to own this disc. Anyone who loves music that is sad and beautiful, hopeful and dispairing by turns, gentle at times and then insistant...Aw heck! Just buy the thing. You won't be sorry!
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Superb 8 Mar. 2011
By John Bonavia - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I agree totally with the other two. My CD is presented a little differently from the one shown here - more "budget" packaging - but it is the Harmonia Mundi publication and performance. Wonderful playing. It is not easy to make us hear the Schubert, the whole Schubert, and nothing but the Schubert. Many players come more or less to grief. I have always loved Murray Perahia's performances - I almost said "interpretations", but that's the point, we don't want an interpreter, just a communicator! "The "just" is so difficult! Now we have an equally worthy performer and I will seek out his other recordings.

I also like Leonskaja - she certainly appreciates the depths of emotion that make Schubert so wonderful - but occasionally I sense it is her response I am hearing, not the original.

The Lewis recording is a tiny bit less than perfect but communication comes through anyway.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
great interpretation 1 Jan. 2013
By Coraci P. Malta - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Paul Lewis is a fantastic pianist. He plays Schubert beautifully. His technique is perfect, the dynamics is remarkable. Great album.
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
A phenomenal Schubert sonata recording from a gifted young pianist 17 Dec. 2010
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is the earliest of Paul Lewis's CD output that I've run across, dating back to 2002, when the pianist turned thirty. I've been enthusiastic about a young American, Jonathan Biss, in Schubert and Beethoven, but this recording outshines his considerably. Such natural authority in Schubert's deceptively simple idiom, which calls for innocent lyricism, dramatic tension learned from Beethoven, and a total absence of affectation, is rare -- and Lewis has it. Other than Pollini's performances on DG, I haven't been as riveted by a Schubert pianist since Richter.

One of Lewis's teachers, Alfred Brendel, made an early impression with the great C minor Sonata D. 958, but that reading sounds brittle and thin compared to this one. Lewis's ability to phrase a lyrical line is thoroughly satisfying, and his variety of touch in the sonata's tender Adagio exhibits a moving sensitivity. Nothing is done for external effect, yet he rises to the occasion when the music strides boldly. I often find with the best performances that it's hard to find descriptive phrases for what makes them so good -- the impulse is simply to point out that something wonderful has occurred and let listeners find out for themselves. That's true in this superlative C minor sonata. I can't find a flaw anywhere other than occasional hardness in fortissimo outbursts.

Pianists seem to have a hard time with the haunting A minor Sonata D. 784, because its ambiguous moods and shifting half lights are combined with some declamatory passages that make the piano roar. Richter mounts an attack that is too savage for many, but that's better than lying back and hoping that drawing a while line down the middle of the road will get you where you want to go. Lewis brings rare musical instincts to this sonata -- you would never guess that any such difficulties exist. (He's so much better than Brendel that I've promised myself not to associate the two anymore -- every critic does, as a knee jerk reflex.) The only fly in the ointment is the piano sound, which is somewhat pingy and reverberant, but hardly to the extent that the Gramophone reviewer complained of.
1 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Schubert 1 Jan. 2013
By Richard T. Thio - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This sounds like a cheap version of Harmonia Mundi. I am not used to such a poor recording and will forego to get these series of Harmonia Mund, obviously less than what could be from such an artist and record company.
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