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Schoenberg: The Piano Music
 
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Schoenberg: The Piano Music

15 Oct 1997 | Format: MP3

£8.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £8.77 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:55
30
2
7:12
30
3
2:33
30
4
1:16
30
5
0:54
30
6
1:02
30
7
0:28
30
8
0:33
30
9
1:15
30
10
2:12
30
11
1:19
30
12
2:49
30
13
1:39
30
14
2:28
30
15
1:08
30
16
1:05
30
17
1:10
30
18
1:09
30
19
3:25
30
20
3:58
30
21
2:37
30
22
2:09
30
23
3:37


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 30 May 1988
  • Release Date: 30 May 1988
  • Label: Deutsche Grammophon (DG)
  • Copyright: (C) 1988 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 49:53
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001N2OIFW
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 71,887 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
A wonderful collection of Schoenberg piano music here - powerful, masterful and full of emotion at every turn. Of course this style of modernist, often dischordant music is not to everyone's taste, but for anyone of who loves something a bit different, anyone who wants to expand their musical horizons, this is not a bad place to start!
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Scriabinmahler TOP 500 REVIEWER on 18 Feb 2010
Format: Audio CD
I'm not a great fan of Pollini - I find some of his playing a bit too clinical and mechanical, which often sounds like a player-piano, but this recording of Schönberg's solo piano works impressed me a lot. His keen awareness of the structure of each piece and uncompromisingly polished tone makes for truly gripping account of the music.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 16 reviews
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Schoenberg's Short Masterpieces 3 Sep 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I am astonished by the review that gave this only 1 star. Schoenberg, even though he never played the piano, wrote masterfully for the instrument. These pieces advance piano literature by light-years, and one should not be prejudiced against them because none of them are written in his early post-Wagnerian manner. My advice: listen to each piece for 5 times consecutively. Then you will behold the poignant expressionism that many of the pieces convey. Great Works of Music. A Must for anyone interested in 20th Century Music.
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
a staggering interpretation with 100% conviction 20 May 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Schoenberg's music can be difficult for the first time listener - that I admit. If you give it some time, though, it begins to make much more sense, and the passion and expression written into the score begin to come out. It may not happen the first or second time you listen to this record, but if you put forth an effort, it will happen. Pollini plays these pieces with 100% conviction - absolutely essential for this music to come across. I would call his music making immaculate. As for that other review of this disc and the comments on Schoenberg, that listener did not do his homework on Schoenberg or the system which he created. Schoenberg did not set out to destroy tonality, he merely took the next logical step and devised a system (which even he does not strictly follow) that is derived from natural acoustical principles (overtone series). No self-respecting musicologist or even afficionado can deny that. If your not sure, do your own reasearch and find out. As part of your reasearch, buy this album - if you approach it with an open mind, it will not displease.
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Fugitive beauty 24 Jan 2003
By Autonomeus - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Pollini plays Schoenberg's piano pieces fantastically. This chronological presentation allows you to hear the progression from the atonal works to the later 12-tone compositions. Adorno held the atonal works to be the highest pinnacle of expression, and it's easy to see why he was so impressed.

I find it amazing to compare Schoenberg and the painter Kandinsky. They were friends, and participated in a joint revolution across types of art, Schoenberg pushing dissonant chromaticism into outright atonality as Kandinsky did the same with painting, pushing Impressionism's blurring of the object to total abstraction. Then, in the 1920s, Schoenberg developed his 12-tone system as Kandinsky developed a parallel system of abstract forms at Bauhaus in Weimar and Dessau.

I strongly prefer Kandinsky's Bauhaus work to his earlier period, while with Schoenberg, I enjoy both, but prefer the first breakthroughs to the atonal. His "Suite for Piano" and other 12-tone works incorporate a pure, Baroque structure, and mark a phase of consolidation. The earlier works, especially, seem to document the dissolution of the ego, and Pollini conveys them as fleeting, fugitive beauty.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
astonishing still 6 Aug 2001
By scarecrow - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
this still remains the most convincing interpretation of this music,although quite recently Mitsuko Uchida brings similar interpretive values as Pollini. Schoenberg had the guts like Freud within those times in deep dark Vienna to explore the uglier dimensions of the human spirit. Who denies that there is not a dark unexplored,disturbing area to all of us? It's fairly obvious. Schoenberg's piano music is very direct and functional, Bach-like contrapuntal designs. There is holdovers of post romanticism of accompanimental figures, Well who can step with both feet into the unknown better one foot at a time. Opus 11 remains the most powerfully compact excursion into this forbidden expressive world, with the flagellations of sound of timbre in this first piece, where you silently depress tones and violently play others,harmonics are the result. Schoenberg also had some elegant sense of voicing chords, other times they are quite ugly with base provincial voicings of atonal triads in thirds intervals, again very direct and bland yet exciting, and dark. What Pollini brings to this music as no other, is he's not afraid of making the music ugly, and he doesn't try to fix it's deep dark graphic dimensions. He also has a wonderful lyrical sense of direction, telescoping where the music is going.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
An accessible interpretation of difficult music 30 Jun 2000
By ebrinkma - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
The piano was where Schoenberg worked out his compositional problems. Op.11 was one of his first free atonal pieces and Op.23 contains his first serial movement. It is not fair to dismiss these pieces as merely experimental. It is true that they are more difficult to listen to than Schoenberg's orchestral or chamber music because there is no element of timbre- whereas in the third of Schoenberg's Five Pieces for Orchestra we can enjoy the tone color of the shifting orchestral texture, when listening to his piano music one is forced to concentrate on the pitches themselves. However, there is still a way into this music, even for the novice. To my ears, Pollini takes care above all to show how these pieces are an extension of the 19th century romantic tradition. There is, especially in op.11 and op.19 a genuinely romantic aesthetic. Even in such a hermetic piece as Op.25, Pollini's intentions cannot be questioned. And, of course, his technique is everywhere flawless.
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