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Schoenberg: Orchestral Works [CD]

Sir Simon Rattle , Jeffrey Tate Audio CD

Price: £11.34 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

Schoenberg: Orchestral Works + Berg: Violin Concerto; Three Orchestra Pieces; Piano Sonata No.1; String Quartet No.3 etc
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Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         


Disc 1:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Verklärte Nacht, Op.4Artemis Quartet/Thomas Kakuska/Valentin Erben28:58Album Only
Listen  2. Chamber Symphony for 15 solo instruments, Op.9: Langsam - Sehr rasch -Birmingham Contemporary Music Group/Sir Simon Rattle 4:53£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Chamber Symphony for 15 solo instruments, Op.9: [Fig. 32] Feurig - Hauptzeitmaß - ruhiger - sehr rasch -Birmingham Contemporary Music Group/Sir Simon Rattle 6:39£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Chamber Symphony for 15 solo instruments, Op.9: [Fig. 77] Viel langsamer - fließender - schwungvoll - Hauptzeitmaß -Birmingham Contemporary Music Group/Sir Simon Rattle 7:08£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Chamber Symphony for 15 solo instruments, Op.9: [Fig. 100] Etwas ruhiger - steigernd - HauptzeitmaßBirmingham Contemporary Music Group/Sir Simon Rattle 3:09£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Chamber Symphony No. 2, Op.38: I. AdagioJeffrey Tate/English Chamber Orchestra 8:49£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Chamber Symphony No. 2, Op.38: II. Con fuoco - molto adagioJeffrey Tate/English Chamber Orchestra11:43Album Only


Disc 2:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Five Orchestral Pieces, Op.16: I. Vorgefühle (Sehr rasch)City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Sir Simon Rattle 2:22£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Five Orchestral Pieces, Op.16: II. Vergangenes (Mässige Viertel)City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Sir Simon Rattle 5:54£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Five Orchestral Pieces, Op.16: III. Farben (Mässige Viertel)City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Sir Simon Rattle 4:13£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Five Orchestral Pieces, Op.16: IV. Peripetie (Sehr rasch)City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Sir Simon Rattle 2:37£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Five Orchestral Pieces, Op.16: V. Das obligate Rezitativ (Bewegte Achtel)City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Sir Simon Rattle 3:41£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Erwartung (Monodrama), Op.17 (1909): I. Szene: Hier hinein? Man sieht den Weg nicht...Sir Simon Rattle/City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Phyllis Bryn-Julson 2:51£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Erwartung (Monodrama), Op.17 (1909): II. Szene: Ist das noch der Weg? Hier ist es eben.Sir Simon Rattle/City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Phyllis Bryn-Julson 2:51£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Erwartung (Monodrama), Op.17 (1909): III. Szene: Da kommt ein Licht!Sir Simon Rattle/City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Phyllis Bryn-Julson 1:51£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Erwartung (Monodrama), Op.17 (1909), IV: Szene:: Er ist auch nicht da...Sir Simon Rattle/City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Phyllis Bryn-Julson 2:09£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Erwartung (Monodrama), Op.17 (1909), IV: Szene:: Das Mondlicht...nein, dort...Sir Simon Rattle/City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Phyllis Bryn-Julson 2:50£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Erwartung (Monodrama), Op.17 (1909), IV: Szene:: Was soll ich tun...Sir Simon Rattle/City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Phyllis Bryn-Julson 4:22£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Erwartung (Monodrama), Op.17 (1909), IV: Szene:: Aber seltsam ist dein Auge...Sir Simon Rattle/City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Phyllis Bryn-Julson 2:23£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Erwartung (Monodrama), Op.17 (1909), IV: Szene:: Du siehst wieder dort hin?...Sir Simon Rattle/City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Phyllis Bryn-Julson 1:41£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen14. Erwartung (Monodrama), Op.17 (1909), IV: Szene:: Oh! nicht einmal die Gnade...Sir Simon Rattle/City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Phyllis Bryn-Julson 3:59£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen15. Erwartung (Monodrama), Op.17 (1909), IV: Szene:: Liebster, Liebster, der Morgen kommt...Sir Simon Rattle/City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Phyllis Bryn-Julson 4:50£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen16. Variations for Orchestra, Op.31: Introduktion und Theme -City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Sir Simon Rattle 2:44£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen17. Variations for Orchestra, Op.31: Variation I -City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Sir Simon Rattle 1:11£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen18. Variations for Orchestra, Op.31: Variation II -City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Sir Simon Rattle 2:19£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen19. Variations for Orchestra, Op.31: Variation III -City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Sir Simon Rattle0:49£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen20. Variations for Orchestra, Op.31: Variation IV -City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Sir Simon Rattle 1:21£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen21. Variations for Orchestra, Op.31: Variation V -City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Sir Simon Rattle 2:09£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen22. Variations for Orchestra, Op.31: Variation VI -City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Sir Simon Rattle 1:41£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen23. Variations for Orchestra, Op.31: Variation VII -City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Sir Simon Rattle 2:50£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen24. Variations For Orchestra, Op.31: Variation VIII -City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Sir Simon Rattle0:36£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen25. Variations for Orchestra, Op.31: Variation IX -City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Sir Simon Rattle0:59£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen26. Variations for Orchestra, Op.31: FinaleCity of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Sir Simon Rattle 6:36£0.99  Buy MP3 


Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Spectacular introduction to a supposedly difficult composer 17 July 2011
By dysfunctional-harmony - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
...though I have to admit I can't vouch for Erwartung. That work is as impenetrable to me as to anybody else (ESPECIALLY WITHOUT THE TEXT! WHY, EMI, WHY?!?!). All I know is that Phyllis Bryn-Julson is a spectacular soprano, and I trust her to give as great a performance of this work as any she's sung. Given just how introverted the piece is, it's difficult to do more than simply listen to it as if it was entirely abstract, and hope for the best. As for the other pieces...

Verklarte Nacht is given a particularly rare, intimate and intense performance of the quintet original by the Artemis Quartet and Valentin Erben on the first disc. This performance is as spectacular as any I've heard.

The Chamber Symphonies are well done. Simon Rattle surprisingly manages to maintain a large amount of tension throughout the first, given just how obvious the derivation of everything from the main themes is. For instance the beginning of the third track really brings to mind Schoenberg's Third Orchestral Piece (of the Five) until the fourths begin to stack to lead to the opening motto.

The Second Chamber Symphony is also given a wonderful reading, this time by Jeffrey Tate and the English Chamber Orchestra (of all ensembles, who would guess?), that perfectly channels all the feelings of desolation in the coda, and makes clear just how much it looks to the past for inspiration. There's even a repeated note ostinato in the fast section, very atypical of Schoenberg!

And now we've come to the real meat of the set: the Five Orchestral Pieces. They are given a bracing reading by Simon Rattle on the second disc.

In the first piece, certain sections could be less rushed or milked more for the dramatic impact than Rattle does, such as the part where muted trombones are the only things left in the fast section right before the sort of "Schoenbergian apocalypse," as you might put it. And the transition leading into the fast section seems really rushed. Other than that, this reading can and will make milk curtle and hair stand on end! The second of five is absolutely gorgeous, everything taken perfectly, with just the right timbre! You can feel the deep-felt emotion all the way through, though especially in the first part. With Schoenberg, it's all about the atmosphere! The celesta is especially haunting at this speed, I must say. The third of five is a little harder to understand than the rest. Many people say it's meant to depict a lakeside in the evening. It would make sense, because the atmosphere in this recording makes it so you can almost feel the ripples of a fish jumping. Certain parts could have been a little softer compared to the rest of the movement, though. Overall it is recorded at a very low volume setting, making you somewhat fearful of the next movement, when you have to rush to the volume just to turn it down, for fear of being blasted by the trumpet run of...

...the penultimate movement. Its sense of angst is a little less than other readings, I must say, until near the end. The last movement is given an especially lyrical reading by Rattle, though I usually like it to go a touch faster. You can really hear the melody being handed from one instrument to the next. Overall this reading of the Five Orchestral Pieces makes it's position as an extension of Late-Romanticism into atonality and German Expressionism quite clear. There is very little in this that, like so many atonal works, is impenetrable and un-evocative. For a companion disc I would probably choose Robert Craft's reading, newly available on Naxos at rock-bottom prices.

I can't QUITE say the same of the Variations. It is very hard to discern the melody. For reasons mainly due to the audibility of an odd percussion instrument, the sheer beauty of the reading by Boulez on Sony has made it my version of preference. This is a great reading, no doubt, but not the best one I've ever heard.

Overall, this set has so much going for it, and, given the low price, there is little standing in the way of it getting my recommendation. If you want Erwartung, though, I would definitely get the evocative version with Jessye Norman and James Levine; it has the libretto! But everything else is worth every penny.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars All of these readings are warm and lyrical, with the exception of a raw 'Verklarte Nacht' 12 Sep 2011
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Except for Verklarte Nacht, audiences still squirm when Schoenberg is programmed, but at least they don't storm out, and newspaper reviewers are no longer allowed to sneer. Simon Rattle even took "difficult" Schoenberg on tour with the Berliners a few seasons ago, while in Boston James Levine regularly programmed it. On this useful EMi twofer one can follow the arc of Schoenberg's development, passing from late Romantic to Expresionist, atonal, and twelve-tone. Only the first phase is regularly welcomed in the concert hall, but I think everything is linked by Expressionism, which I would loosely define as the raw expression of (usually morbid) emotion. As tough as atonalism may be, Schoenberg's music doesn't sit and wait for you to come to it. It throws its emotions at the listener, and with a certain openness, sitting back and letting the score flow over you works as a method of getting into the music.

Here we get an especially stringent, tortured reading of Verklarte Nacht by the Artemis Quartet, who being German, seem to the manner born. They are so Expressionistic in their anguished approach to the first half - before the transfiguration through love - that even the peace that follows feels troubled. We are in the world of Egon Schiele's diseased prostitutes not Gustav Klimt's bespangled, pouty beauties.

The remaining selections come from Rattle's tenure in Birmingham, a time when he sprang upon the British public, via television specials, as the country's first truly modernist conductor. All of his readings are energetic and detailed, and I'd venture to say, somewhat hesitantly, that one can still hear a typically English love of wrmth and melody, as opposed to the grandeur of Karajan and the cool dialectic of Boulez. The young CBSO musicians can't match either rival for technical precision and virtuoso display, yet Rattle's human way with these daunting scores counts for a lot. The previous reviewer is certainly right that Erwartung, an outpouring of Scoenberg's inspiration at its most tormented and Expressionistic, full of abrupt changes of mood and little detectable form, needs to be followed with a libretto. Listened to as an operatic monologue, Erwartung is accessible without knowing how it was constructed.

The only selection that interrupts Rattle's readings comes from Jeffrey Tate, leading the English Chamber Orchestra in a sleek, well organized, and appealing version of the Chamber Symphony no. 2, where I also detect a comforting overlay of Englishness. The sound throughout, although not remastered, is very good. The soprano in ERwartung, the experienced American Phyllis Bryn-Julson, was held in high esteem in modern music, I believe. Her voice would be too light to carry over Schoenberg's dense orchestration in the concert hall but works well in front of the microphone. To hear a great voice in this music, one can seek out Jessye Norman, and to hear a raw, creepy account, try Anja Silja with Dohnanyi on Decca.
5.0 out of 5 stars The Second Viennese School 17 Jun 2012
By B. A. Dilger - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Arnold Schoenberg is essentially the founder of The Second Viennese School, having lived a long and productive life. Along with his major colleagues Berg and Webern, Schoenberg created new ways of composing classical music for the twentieth century. Though they were products of Late Romanticism, their compositions later influenced the movie and TV industry by the modern sound. It is like the recordings in this compilation by EMI that their best works remain available for those who want access to twentieth century music that isn't often programmed in US venues. The EMI two-CD series of these and other modern composers is a good start to obtain a neglected sub-genre of classical music, and really valuable contributions to the classical music repertoire.
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