See Wishlist
Schizophrenia (feat. Curtis Fuller, James Spaulding. Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter & Joe Chambers)
 
See larger image
 

Schizophrenia (feat. Curtis Fuller, James Spaulding. Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter & Joe Chambers)

22 Jun 1995 | Format: MP3

£4.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
6:16
30
2
5:42
30
3
6:50
30
4
6:29
30
5
5:00
30
6
6:20


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 22 Jun 1995
  • Release Date: 22 Jun 1995
  • Label: Blue Note Records
  • Copyright: (C) 1995 Blue Note Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 36:37
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001IT99QI
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 68,258 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Huck Flynn VINE VOICE on 26 July 2006
Format: Audio CD
Coming from Shorter's ethereal soprano sound in Weather Report, this was my first sample of his illustrious Blue Note catalogue and remains my favourite tenor sax CD but it's the strength of the compositions and arrangements and performance that make Schizophrenia such a fantastic album. Listen to those simple piano chords introducing Tom Thumb leading to the powerful theme stated by the triple horns - memorable, hummable - leading into the obligatory solo spots before it resolves back to the main theme. A classic track and followed by 4 other Shorter briliant tunes and a Spaulding original too. The great thing about the album is that it is a group effort - even on showcase tenor ballad like Miyako (one of Shorter's most memorable) Hancock, Carter and Chambers create a fabulous mood and Spaulding's alto contributes a sympathetic solo. Nice to hear Fuller's excellent trombone and Spaulding's flute, both adding to the textures and colours (listen to Go for example). This was one of Shorter's last Blue Note sessions (1967)and his writing and playing shows a maturity, like he's absorbed all the influences and has forged his own unique voice. Much of this credit goes to Art Blakey for nurturing the talent with the Messengers that Miles Davis would go on to milk later. I think Shorter's "solo" work like this, Speak No Evil, Soothsayer and others are the best things he's ever done. Enjoy the master at work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search

Look for similar items by category