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Schaum's Outline of Principles of Computer Science (Schaum's Outline Series)
 
 

Schaum's Outline of Principles of Computer Science (Schaum's Outline Series) [Kindle Edition]

Carl Reynolds , Paul Tymann
3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Product Description

Product Description

Learn the essentials of computer science



Schaum’s Outline of Principles of Computer Science provides a concise overview of the theoretical foundation of computer science. It also includes focused review of object-oriented programming using Java.

About the Author

Paul Tymann, M.S., is an associate professor atRochester Institute of Technology. Carl Reynolds is aprofessor of computer science at Rochester Institute of Technology.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 7413 KB
  • Print Length: 221 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Up to 4 simultaneous devices, per publisher limits
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill; 1 edition (27 Mar 2008)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000SEG4C6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #71,071 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
3.7 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent 25 Aug 2010
Format:Paperback
Short and wonderful overview of the field of computer science. Clearly structured and easy to read, starting with a very useful and interesting chapter on algorithms.
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Format:Paperback
I did not study Computer Science at university and so this book gave me a broad insight into the kind of knowledge I'd have gained had I done so. On the most part, it's an easy read. The programme of topics are well chosen and I am glad that I have covered them.

However, I would only recommend this book to others for as long as I am unable to find an alternative book that covers the same subjects.

I gave this a low Amazon Review score because I get the impression that the publishers of this book (McGraw-Hill) have been resting on their laurels since it's first publication and needed a kick up the backside.

I don't think anyone at McGraw-Hill has actually read it. Nor, it seems have the authors read it all the way through. Some parts of the book are very sloppy. It feels like no one in charge of this book really cares about it any more.

I am glad that I had read around many of the subjects enough to be able to spot some errors but am left wondering how much misinformation I have absorbed in the areas that were new to me. The fact that the book's cover states that it is 'trusted by more than 40 million students' worries me. Hopefully they have the support of their peers and teachers when they get confused by some of the typos.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Too much depth for A-level, but well written. 9 Jan 2014
By JohnH52
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Still working my way through this book. Initial impact - well written and comprehensive. Maybe more comprehensive than I need for A-level.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent; doesn't hold back on key concepts which other books steer clear of due to computational complexity. Very effective. 3 Nov 2011
By Eric A. Heisman - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I've been reading computer science books for over six months while trying to learn the field. Of all the material I've come across which amounts to quite a bit, this 200+ page summary without question offers the most valuable review of the core aspects of computer science by far. What really impressed me is the emphasis on computational theory from the start as well as a wide range of examples of various programming languages with code samples to boot. If you're interested in truly learning computer science from its foundation or if you feel unfamiliar with any area of computer science I strongly recommend this book.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book for a Computer Science Student 18 Mar 2011
By Steven R. Denelsbeck - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book is a wealth of information for people studying Computer Science. The materials are laid-out in an easy-to-follow format and the explanations are clear and concise (for those with a mind for this type of material). The only problem with this type of book is that it refers to an ever-evolving type of science and may quickly become obsolete, but I would not allow that to deter others from using this book to gain some solid foundations for understanding the principles of CompSci.
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Meh. 17 July 2010
By Mfragin - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is a competent book on Computer Science, but just about any introductory CS textbook will cover these topics and many more. If you are familiar with other Schaum's outlines, you'll probably know what to expect. The price is no doubt much lower than most CS textbooks, so this book certainly is justified in certain cases. Nothing terrible in here, but also nothing terribly exciting or original. Worth buying and reading if you are interested in CS as a subject of study and are not required to buy some other CS text for an Intro course.
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Book to Help Understand Computer Science 24 Jan 2014
By Christopher McDonald - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Very helpful in explaining the basic principles of computer science. I'm presently studying introduction to programming along with C programming and I use it to explain basics of Pseudocode and other design principles.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good to know the history of a stuject 4 Feb 2011
By L. L. S - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is a good book for anyone interested in computers. It is always good to know the history of any subject you are interested in. Some things I knew already but found the history of computers interesting.
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We say the sequential search algorithm is (n) because in the average case, and the worst case, its performance slows in proportion to n, the length of the list. &quote;
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