Savage Spawn: Reflections on Violent Children and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 2 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Delivery, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Savage Spawn (The library of contemporary thought) Paperback – 19 Feb 2000


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£6.99
£4.19 £0.01
Audio Cassette
"Please retry"
£39.87


Product details

  • Paperback: 134 pages
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books Inc.; 1 Reprint edition (19 Feb 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345429397
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345429391
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 0.8 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,252,765 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Jonathan Kellerman is one of the world's most popular authors. He has brought his expertise as a clinical psychologist to more than thirty bestselling crime novels, including the Alex Delaware series, The Butcher's Theatre, Billy Straight, The Conspiracy Club, Twisted, and True Detectives. With his wife, the novelist Faye Kellerman, he co-authored the bestsellers Double Homicide and Capital Crimes. He is the author of numerous essays, short stories, scientific articles, two children's books, and three volumes of psychology, including Savage Spawn: Reflections on Violent Children. He has won the Goldwyn, Edgar, and Anthony awards and has been nominated for a Shamus Award.
Jonathan and Faye Kellerman live in California and New Mexico. Their four children include the novelists Jesse Kellerman and Aliza Kellerman.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
I KNOW THE EXACT DAY I decided to write this book. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 17 July 1999
Format: Paperback
Jonathan Kellerman, best known for his psychological fiction is actually a highly qualified child psychologist.
In the non-fiction examination of Violence in Children or "Savage Spawn" as Kellerman titles his work, readers are offered a no nonsense overview of some of the salient issues at play when discussing the contribuors to childhood violence.
Having worked with Juvenile Delinquent Adolescents in a residential treatment center for five years of my career, I feel that I have some good insights into the issues Kellerman addresses. Kellerman is appropriately realistic in the need to acknowledge that there is no causation that can be attributed to only nature or only nurture in the causation of male childhood violence. He believes, and I agree, that we have to factor both of these causative contributors together in order to get some insight into violence in kids.
I am reluctant to be particularly ready to dismiss the psychiatric role in the prevention and treatment of violence through the treatment of faulty neurotransmitters in the brain. The reality is that millions of people have been helped by the new class of drugs known as SSRI's. Further, Jonathan Kellerman's truly subjective bias against the psychiatric profession on a wholesale scale is somewhat inappropriate on a professional level and actually inaccurate when dismissed completely in the extent in which Kellerman takes his argument.
Interestingly or perhaps more ironically, Kellerman is an obvious supporter of treatment of kids with the drug Ritalin -- a psychiatric drug -- which is particularly controversial, certainly overprescribed and questionably effective in a large majority of cases of children under its influence.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
Though I'm only halfway through the essay, I send kudos to Dr. Kellerman for his bold and unapologetic stance on a difficult and controversial subject. Those that have not peered into the eyes (or file--or better yet, have not seen crime scene photos, then spoken with "the nice fellow who couldn't have possibly done what was in those pictures, or if he did, he was 'temporarily insane'") of a psychopath (of any age) will think him curt, dismissive, and with a political agenda. Those that have, will immediately feel relief that they are not alone in their mixed feelings of fear (of what the "person" is capable of doing), guilt (for feeling the way they do), and impotence (regarding how to inform others of their findings).
Though somewhat technical for lay personnel (even the erudite may need a dictionary), his coverage of psychopathy--a term we're afraid to utilize in America--is right on target, especially the history of the word and distinction between "psychopath" and "psychotic." Further, his willingness to discuss same in terms as being identifiable in children as young as three is, albeit chilling, an unfortunate reality of human existance.
As a psychologist for a state parole board who also does evaluations with inner-city children, I was impressed by Dr. Kellerman's use of recent (and older, yet strong) research on the topic. Though he is a popular fiction author, he appears not to have lost his ability to write "scientific" articles. [I primarily evaluate true psychopaths and feel qualified to give Dr. Kellerman such a rating--through my experience and visceral identification with what he says.]
Those that work with offenders (and other non-institutionalized psychopaths) should read this treatise.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
This piece of writing would have been more suited as a 6-page op-ed article in a magazine or newspaper. Instead, Kellerman stretched it out into a book, and the results are less than inspiring. Although he does bring in some interesting insight and ideas, best expressed in two specific examples, he continually adresses the broader issue of psycopathy in general, instead of in children. Also, Kellerman obviously has a political agenda that includes harsh prison sentences and the belief that some people are born evil. While there is nothing wrong with these beliefs, they unfortunately affect the authors objectivity on the subject he is writing about.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By A Customer on 21 May 1999
Format: Paperback
Kellerman's reflections on youth violence are refreshing and sure to be controversial since he makes a recommendation that cold-blooded teen murderers should be locked up until they die. He also recommends that prevention efforts be focused on identifying and treating those children who appear to have the highest risk for going off on a rampage. While this is not a full scholarly treatment of the subject of youth violence, it considers many theories about how children become violent, making it superior in my view to the unitary causation theory (our methods of socializing boys) presented in William Pollack's Real Boys.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback