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Sandworms of Dune Paperback – 20 Mar 2008

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Product details

  • Paperback: 624 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder Paperbacks; paperback / softback edition (20 Mar. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0340837527
  • ISBN-13: 978-0340837528
  • Product Dimensions: 11.6 x 4 x 17.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (67 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 94,748 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

'[Herbert and Anderson] do a great job in investing the plot with heft and complexity and the narrative with pace and momentum, and conveying the sheer ferocity of the betrayals and duplicities . . . a rare, rattling page-turner that no Dune adherent will pass up.' (Kirkus Reviews)

Frank Herbert would surely be delighted and proud of this continuation of his vision. (Dean Koontz)

Those who long to return to the world of desert, spice and sandworms will be amply satisfied (The Times)

'A triumphant climax to the history of the Dune universe.' (Bookseller on THE BATTLE OF CORRIN)

'For those of us who grew up with the world of spice and sand - how gratifying to revisit characters who felt like old friends, now brought to a satisfying conclusion.' (My Weekly)

Book Description

Using Frank Herbert's final outline -- hidden in a bank safe deposit box for eleven years -- Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson now tell the grand climax of the story left unfinished in CHAPTER HOUSE: DUNE, and continued in HUNTERS OF DUNE.

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Customer Reviews

2.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By D Brookes on 9 Feb. 2011
Format: Paperback
Having reviewed the first of the two sequels to the Frank Herbert's original series, I'd like to consider this single book on its own merits and not let the inadequacies of "Hunters of Dune" overshadow it.

Bearing that in mind, this one's still not very good. Sorry.

The writing, as before, is very average but serves the purpose. One extremely strong positive for this book is that the story really moves along, it does have one or two surprises, and there is none of the redundant material or repetition that marred its predecessor. The fairly flat writing serves it fairly well, as an already twisty plot could easily be marred by overcomplicated prose.

I'm disappointed that the writers decided to make two books out of this story, as it just wasn't necessary. This should have been one book with 50% of the first scrapped. It would have made a long novel, but a more focused, enjoyable, and better-paced one.

My primary bugbear is the same that utterly obliterated my hopes for the first instalment: the inclusion of elements from the prequels. I am certain that Frank Herbert harboured no intention of reviving the 'thinking machines' for his series' grand finale. The references to the Butlerian Jihad and the removal of technology from his stories to me was a literary device in order to create story about mankind's future, without it being tech-focused (which, realistically, you can't do without something like the Jihad in your story). I just think that Herbert Jnr et al needed an adversary to frame their ideas for the sequels - evident in the fact that the machines hardly make an appearance except at the end.
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31 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Stephen F. Harris on 31 Jan. 2008
Format: Paperback
For all readers new to the Dune series....do not fall into the mistake of assuming that Herbert's original six novels bear any resemblance to this hackneyed, ill-conceived, rushed, canon-contradictory, cash-mining, turgid, terminally thoughtless "work" by these two "authors". Imagine, if you will, a newly-discovered and incomplete Shakespeare play that someone had asked Ernie Wise to finish - yes, it's THAT bad! One star is at least five more than it deserves.
Thank you, rant over!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By S. W. Joice on 23 Feb. 2010
Format: Paperback
So we're really expected to believe that Frank Herbert intended to finish of a series of books that he'd spent so many years of his life crafting with anything close to this drivel?! I cant for a second beleive that the hidden enemy was intended to be the machines which had been brushed over at best by FH, and only made into a big part of the series by BH and KJA. I also cant believe that the whole plan from Paul Atreides to the God Emporer had been for Man and Machine to live happily ever after side by side with Duncan Idaho as some sort of super being?!
I'm truly sorry I couldn't keep my curiosity in check and avoided this book, because I think my own conclusions I came up with after reading Chapterhouse were far more satisfying than this dissappointment of a novel. I feel sorry for the trees that gave their life to put this to print, if I could give it any less stars I would...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M on 20 Jan. 2011
Format: Paperback
This book (and Hunters of Dune) are so far removed from the wonderful magic of the original Dune books that it's not even funny. Sure, Brian and Kevin have different writing styles, so I don't expect them to be like Frank Herbert.

However, they completely messed up the canon, retconning as they pleased, writing whatever pleased them without a single care for the love Frank Herbert put in his books. At the end of Chapterhouse Dune, it is revealed that Daniel and Marty are renegade Face Dancers who have created their own wills/identities, breaking free of their Tleilaxu masters. However, here, Brian and Kevin have changed them into robots bent on world domination. No, really.

In God Emperor of Dune, Leto's Golden Path is revealed, he did not want humankind to stagnate, so he deliberately became the Tyrant to precipitate the Famine Times and the Scattering, so that humans would not be ruled by one person ever again. This was thrown away when Brian and Kevin decided to create the ultimate Gary Stu - the ultimate Duncan Idaho ghola/Erasmus/super-dee-dup[er Kwisatz Haderach. This made me do a major facepalm. The ending was utterly ruined by this!

Brian and Kevin also played around with the idea of Other Memory by having the Baron Harkonnen ghola have Alia in his OM! Dude, OM does NOT work in reverse! Ancestors CAN'T gain memory of their descendants, unless they Share, but Harkonnen didn't, Alia just showed up one fine day in his mind and tries to drive him crazy!

Basically, Brian and Kevin have turned Dune 7 into a massive trainwreck, and it is questionable if they even have the notes of Frank Herbert that they CLAIM to have found. Personally, I don't believe it. If you like Dune, stick with the 6 books Frank Herbert wrote, and if you want supplementary material, read the Dune Encyclopedia, because all the new 'Dune' books just read like poorly-written fanfiction.
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36 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Sharon Woodward on 22 Nov. 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I too have been waiting for this book to appear for some 20 odd years Then here it was, or here they were.

That was the first thing, in a long line of things, that annoyed me.

How on earth did DUNE 7 manage to become DUNE 7.1 and DUNE 7.2? One earlier reviewer stated that they thought it scandalous that some of us may think that the authors might try to milk this series for profit. The proof is right there sunshine, the proof is right there. This was one of the MOST ANTICIPATED BOOKS EVER, we did not need warm ups, reminders or other superflua to 'get us back up to speed' no, we just needed the story.

As to the actual story, if you are prepared to grace it with such a honourable descriptive, no way pal. My review title says it all. Not in a million years did Frank Herbert intend his story to end this way. I can see that there would be a reason why the Duncan Ghola character had been kept around all that time. I can see him as the ultimate Super Kwizatz Haderach. Can even see that this as being one of the only true and original Frank Herbert ideas to weave its way through this mess of instant toilet paper. It makes more sense as such because not only has he been around for ages, he has all of his serial Ghola memories inside him. So in a FH kind of way, it would fit in the 'real' DUNE universe

As for the rest...

Characters appear for no real reason, then get killed. Characters appear for no real reason, do not get killed but do NOTHING. Characters who have been around for a while (by this time, about 4 books worth of 'aroundness'!) certainly long enough for you to get used to how they act and react...suddenly start to act and react totally differently to any previous description!
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