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Sandman: Doll's House Paperback – 27 Aug 2010


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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Titan Books Ltd; New edition edition (27 Aug. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1848568193
  • ISBN-13: 978-1848568198
  • Product Dimensions: 17 x 0.9 x 25.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 313,093 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Neil Gaiman is a tour de force of creative talent. He is the bestselling author of Coraline and Stardust, both of which are major motion films. Neil also co-wrote the script for Beowulf starring Anthony Hopkins and Angeline Jolie. He is the creator/writer of the award-winning Sandman comic series and has written several books for children. His latest title, The Graveyard Book, won the Teenage Booktrust Prize 2009. Neil has been immortalised in song by Tori Amos, and is a songwriter himself. His official website now has more than one million unique visitors each month, and his online journal is syndicated to thousands of blog readers every day.

Product Description

About the Author

Neil Gaiman is the most critically acclaimed comics writer of the 1990s and is the author of numerous books and graphic novels. He is the New York Times No. 1 best-selling author of American Gods and Anansi Boys, and won critical acclaim for his first feature film, Mirrormask, with long-time collaborator Dave McKean.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By Sam Quixote TOP 50 REVIEWER on 24 Jan. 2015
Format: Paperback
What do you do when you encounter a run of bad comics? Return to the ones you’ve read and loved before for a re-read! So it’s doubly disappointing when a comic you thought you enjoyed way back when turns out to be kinda crappy – even more so when it’s an acknowledged classic like The Sandman!

Morpheus has returned to the Dreamtime after being imprisoned for 70 years (see the first volume for how that came to be and how he escaped). He begins putting things to rights and sets off to round up his Nightmares who have escaped to Earth – among them is his most lethal creation, The Corinthian. Meanwhile, young Rose Walker discovers her grandmother is Unity Kincaid, the woman who slept most of her life in a side story from the first book. What Rose doesn’t know is that she’s also the Vortex – a being that could potentially destroy Morpheus’ Dream kingdom. And, to save his world, Morpheus must kill the Vortex…

The first chapter sets the tone of this book, ie. rambling and overlong. A pair of African tribesmen go into the desert where the younger of the two is told the story of Morpheus’ forbidden love with an African queen. It does have a point but, my goodness, does Neil Gaiman take his sweet time in getting there! In the meantime we’re told a very banal fairy tale to fill the void.

From there the story plods its way through, primarily focusing on Rose Walker. Rose isn’t a particularly interesting character but we spend an inordinate amount of time with her anyway. Rose goes back to America to look for her long-lost brother, Jed. She rents a room in a house that feels like a prototype for the house Gaiman will use in his later book, Coraline. Rose meets Gilbert aka Fiddler’s Green and they bizarrely team up.
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16 of 20 people found the following review helpful By hez on 27 Feb. 2003
Format: Paperback
The whole Sandman series is not only amazing in it's weird characterisations (Death is a funky upbeat lass and Dream is her morose, depressed brother) but it is very cleverly written. Each book could be read on it's own but you really realise Gaiman's genius when you read them all in order and then reread them again. The intricate way the story weaves itself and the characters around themselves is not something you will find done so well anywhere in the graphic novel genre. There is always a new connection and twist. Gaiman and his wonderfully quirky way of seeing the world is shown best in these works, but for a really accessible and fun introduction you also need to get hold of Good Omens (written with Terry Pratchett). Priceless stuff.
Watch out for references to any and all important literature in the last 400 years, including Shakespeare, who plays a modest role in the Sandman.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Having heard the positive reviews on Neil Gaiman's seminal work I decided to give it a punt. Don't regret it. The series starts ok in volume 1 but really picks up and expands the universe(s) here with a real feeling of depth to the worlds seen. There is a definite story arc across the collection with a single issue straying elsewhere. I wouldn't read without starting in volume 1 where the for dating are set but there is a prologue (very interestingly written) that fills you in. Look forward to volume 3.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Awesome, and astounding... By all means the series keeps getting better, and in this volume we follow the strange world of Rose Walker... Enjoy, enjoy!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Mind bending brilliance from Neil Gaiman. Vol 2 of the sandman series is cleverly written and thought provoking in a weird surreal kind if way. Strange characters and settings but mind expanding all the more for that oddness. Grim and somehow hopeful all at the same time.
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By Lilith on 15 Mar. 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Brought this for my teenage son, I'm a big fan of Neil Gaiman so I hoped he would enjoy it. He didn't put it down and has requested the rest of the sandman books. Success!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 1 May 2011
Format: Paperback
The Sandman has returned to his country of dreams, but his long absence is still showing -- he's gotten his magical items back, but not all of his followers. "The Sandman Vol. 2: The Doll's House" picks up some threads from the first collection of Sandman stories, and while the story is often confusing and scattered, Neil Gaiman's writing is a glittering jewel of sadness, horror and beauty.

Among the current-day stories, we get some Dream backstory. As part of his coming-of-age ritual, a young boy is told of how a beautiful woman fell in love with Lord Kai'ckul, king of the dream realm. And we see a story of a man untouched by Death, and his ups-and-downs over the centuries as he keeps meeting with his Endless friend.

In the present, Dream learns that a dream vortex has appeared. That vortex is Rose Walker, the granddaughter of Unity Kinkaid (who has slept most of her life), who is searching for her imprisoned little brother. She goes to live at a boarding house full of eccentrics, and is taken under the wing of the mysterious Gilbert (who looks a lot like G.K. Chesterton, and is named "Gilbert").

Additionally, some of Dream's creatures have escaped -- the horrifying Corinthian, who is the guest of honor at a serial-killer convention; Brute and Glob, who have made their own "New Sandman" out of a dead superhero; and Fiddler's Green, who is already close to the dream vortex...

"The Sandman Vol. 2: The Doll's House" is a somewhat messy story -- the two "past" stories feel disconnected from the rest of the book, and it takes awhile for some of the subplots to fully flower.
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