Or
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.

See Wishlist
San Francisco
 
See larger image
 

San Francisco

1 Mar 2003 | Format: MP3

11.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 8.83 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Srl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
4:33
2
4:35
3
3:12
4
4:23
5
3:11
6
4:15
7
5:04
8
3:29
9
4:48
10
6:30
11
4:45
12
3:37
13
4:42
14
3:57
15
2:35

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Mar 2003
  • Release Date: 1 Mar 2003
  • Label: Virgin UK
  • Copyright: (C) 1994 Virgin Records LtdThis label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved.(C) 1994 Virgin Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:03:36
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001I9X0TA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 223,685 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 4 Feb 2001
Format: Audio CD
I think a lot of AMC fans saw this album as the big 'sell-out' attempt at mainstream pop success. I wish that it had been successful, because it's a lost gem. Songs like 'Fearless', 'What Holds the World Together' and 'Cape Canaveral' display Eitzel's knack at writing heartbreaking tunes. But there are a couple of fine pop songs on this CD, namely 'Can You Help Me' and 'I Broke My Promise'. And the single 'Wish the World Away' was an angry howl, with a great video. Musically, the band have never sounded better. Bruce Kaphan's pedal steel is used especially well on 'Fearless'(surely one of the best opening tracks on any album ever).
Overall, I love this album. The only thing wrong with it is that it goes on a bit too long, and whenever I listen to 'Revolving Door', I'm reminded of Bryan Ferry, for some strange reason!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By klaher on 8 May 2010
Format: Audio CD
After the dispiriting experience (for the band at least) of Mercury, American Music Club went another direction for 1994's San Francisco. Which is not to say it's a mainstream album. Indeed as an album of 15 tracks, many of which are quite disparate, it's nothing short of sprawling.

Fearless, the opening track, kicks off with Bruce Kaphan's steel guitar prominent in the mix before Mark Eitzel's moody vocals come in, singing "lost again..." in a lovelorn lament. It's a lovely sounding song, though for my money the lyrics on this are a little obvious. In fact the lyrics on this album in my opinion are a little disappointing when compared with previous albums.

It's Your Birthday appears to be a response to touring with Pearl Jam and the prevailing grunge sound of the time as it is a kind of self-consciously aggressive sounding song, while Can You Help Me? is a more pleasant sounding song. It sounds quite commercial, but it's actually a really good song, with a `proper' verse and chorus. It should have been a hit, but perhaps Eitzel and co weren't wearing the right plaid shirts and goatees.

Love Doesn't Belong to Anyone is another track featuring prominent steel guitar, and again it's quite pretty, with delicate picked guitar. It does not, however, feel important, in the same way that some of their previous work does. After the fairly ordinary Wish the World Away we get a kind of left turn with the classicly titled How Many Six Packs Does It Take To Screw in a Light, which is a sort of quirky kind of song. Cape Canaveral which follows is a lot more downbeat as the bands instruments coalesce into a magnificently gloomy murk.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Mark Eitzel's best album as part of American Music Club - though his word play can sound occasionally cloying - the passion behind the words move than overcomes this. Marvellous.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Jason Parkes #1 HALL OF FAME on 21 April 2004
Format: Audio CD
San Francisco was the last American Music Club album...well, until the band announced they had reformed (with a minor personnel change) last year and a new album and tour are on the way. San Francisco isn't viewed particularly well- I've read some fans' perceptions that it's patchy and even poor; while the mail-order only AMC-compilation '1984-1995' selected by the band doesn't have anything from it- plumping for demos of songs like Sleeping Pills and LA is My Woman instead of anything from San Francisco. This I feel is slightly unfair to SF- which is a good, sometimes great album- though perhaps one that ought to be contrasted to Mark Eitzel's solo debut 60 Watt Silver Lining (1996- which featured some AMC-members) than an AMC-classic like Everclear or Mercury.
At 15-tracks (including a hidden instrumental reprise of Fearless at the end) perhaps SF is too long an album- something that was common in the 90s. There are several attempts at pop here, most of which are succesful, but were probably done to appease the commercial pressures on AMC as "the next big thing." How Many Six Packs...predicts the sound of Shelby Lynne's breakthrough album (This is...) a few years ago and the sound of Liz Phair's underrated Whitechocolatespaceegg (1999); while Love Doesn't Belong to Anyone attempts to balance Vudi's sonics with a Californian-percussive feel. Single Can You Help Me? has Eitzel's typically black comic lyrics, but a sound close to Crowded House (not necessarily a bad thing); the only poor pop-song attempt here is Hello Amsterdam. This sounds like a b-side- perhaps it's the references to Abba and Jonathan King?- one of the least AMC songs, though I suppose it was for fun...
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search

Look for similar items by category