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Samson SAC02 Pencil Condenser Microphone Pair

by SAMSON

RRP: £101.99
Price: £81.00 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: £20.99 (21%)
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
6 new from £79.50
  • Ultra-sensitive, low mass element picks up all of the nuances of any performance
  • Withstands high spls, lending itself to a wide range of miking situations
  • Special shock-mounted mic holder is included to minimize noise and provide additional protection
  • Lightweight and compact
  • Gold plated xlr connector
See more product details

Frequently Bought Together

Samson SAC02 Pencil Condenser Microphone Pair + Stagg 3m High Quality XLR to XLR Plug Microphone Cable + Stagg SMC6 6 metre standard microphone cable
Price For All Three: £89.51

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Product Information

Technical Details
Item Weight680 g
Product Dimensions27.9 x 8.3 x 12.1 cm
Item model numberSAM C02PR
Scale Lengthinches
Country Produced InChina
  
Additional Information
ASINB0002D0KBE
Best Sellers Rank 13,300 in Musical Instruments (See top 100)
Shipping Weight3.2 Kg
Date First Available16 Mar 2006
  
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Product Description

Product Description

Samson C02 condenser microphones deliver high audio performance while remaining cost effective. Delivered as a pair the microphones excel in applications requiring dual placement. Drum cymbals, overheads, percussion, guitar, piano, strings and vocals are accurately captured and reproduced in detail. The C02's low-mass capsule features a cardioid polar pattern. The cardioid pattern provides a tight pick up area at the front of the microphone. The result minimizes ambient room noise and signal from nearby instruments and monitors that may cause feedback. A wide, linear frequency response results in rich detail while minimizing low frequency noise. The C02 requires external +48V phantom power and is a suitable solution for recording and live sound applications. Extended range frequency response for optimum reproduction and exceptionally clear, crisp sound with great transient response. Ultra-sensitive, low mass element picks up all of the nuances of any performance. Tight cardioid polar pattern minimizes feedback problems and effectively rejects signals not originating directly in front of the mic capsule. Withstands high SPLs, lending itself to a wide range of miking situations. Special shock-mounted mic holder is included to minimize noise and provide additional protection. Rugged brass case ensures reliable performance in even the most demanding environments. The included foam wind screen can be fitted to greatly reduce wind noise when used in an outdoor environment, for reducing 'P Popping in vocal applications. Lightweight and compact, the C02 can be mounted on any standard microphone stand using the included shock-mount mic clip. Included foam-lined impact resistant carrying case for convince when transporting three C02 microphones from venue to venue. Gold plated XLR connector. Measures 20 mm diameter by 150 mm length.

Product Description

Pencil Condenser Microphones Features -> SuperCardioid Pickup Pattern -> Gold-plated XLR connectors -> Carry Case & shock-mounted mic clips included -> Sold as stereo pair

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Brian on 30 Mar 2013
Verified Purchase
Fine for the price. Wanted for use with a ukulele band to provide a boost for the lower volume ukuleles, without going over to electro ukes. Works well for up to 3 ukes
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Verified Purchase
Used these so far on stage for percussion/kit, acoustic guitar (as an addition in the mix to DI) and wind (sax/trumpet/trombone). a really nice, controllable sound, with plenty of useable range and punch. Highly recommended as workhorse condensers.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 13 reviews
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
okay for the project studio, but expect to outgrow them 3 Dec 2009
By G. W. Schumacher - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
[Edited for usefulness on 11/15]

I can't bring myself to be super-critical of the Samson C02, because in spite of my occasional dissatisfaction it does have a lot going for it. I've had my pair for about a year, and I use them frequently as overheads on the drum kit, on acoustic guitar, and as "room sound" mics for vocals.

For the latter two applications they are adequate, or at least I can't complain. Unfortunately as drum overheads they have been disappointing, and this is what I primarily wanted to use them for. To my ears they sound a little thin and lack presence and clarity, especially on cymbals. I like the overheads to get a detailed overall picture of the drum kit, so that's a drag. Another bummer is that there are no switches on the mic - something like a bass cut or -10dB pad would have been nice. Without a pad switch, putting this mic under a snare drum is a recipe for disaster. Or maybe you could just ask the drummer to play quieter?

So I guess when it comes to small-diaphragm condensers I still haven't found what I'm looking for. The bad news is that the $400-$700 price bracket is apparently where I have to look next. On most of my projects over the last year I have been able to use a famous similar type of microphone made by AKG, and the comparison is not exactly flattering. Of course, a pair of AKG's "Microphone X" costs about ten times what you're looking at here. And maybe we've come to the root of why it's hard for me to say a lot of nasty things about my Samson CO2s. They are so, so cheap for what you get, namely: a pair of condenser mics, two mini shock-mount/mic clips, two windscreens, and a sturdy, padded plastic carrying case. My griping aside, these things do a borderline-acceptable job as overheads, and in other applications (such as acoustic guitar) they are quite useful. I would probably recommend them to beginning engineers, people on a recession budget, or to anyone looking to keep a couple of budget mics on hand. More serious project studios and home recordists might want to save up for something a little nicer.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Sparkle, hiss, sizzle 3 Feb 2013
By T. Garrison - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Expect to hear a lot of hiss (not as big of a problem for high-volume applications, but for acoustic recordings it is very pronounced,) and what is commonly described as the "sparkly" sound that is common with cheap mass-produced Chinese microphones. This is actually the mic distorting in the very high frequencies (10khz+). Now that I have some decent SDC pencils these aren't even a consideration, and I haven't touched them in a very long time. For a little more money you can get a new Rode or Audix stereo pair that sound a lot better. I have read a few (magazine and blog) reviews that claim these can hold their own against expensive SDC pencils, that just isn't true.

These aren't bad for experimenting with stereo recording, but for professional sounding tracks these aren't a great choice.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Samson CO2 Condenser Mics 13 Jan 2012
By Jake E. - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
We bought 4 of these for our church. They work very well as Choir mics. Obviously not like $1500 Choir Mics but, I would say "they are well worth their money."
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Samson CO2 Condenser Mikes (Pair) 13 Aug 2009
By Bubba Gump - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Great mikes at a great price. The case is nice & they come with wind covers when you buy them in the 2 pack. Item was shipped & received within a few days. I use them for my two sets of Hi Hats & they work great. I already had one CO2 & now I use that one for my Cowbells. Great for miking cymbels, cowbells or for overheads.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
In love with these 3 Feb 2013
By Bass Player - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
I was looking for a good pair of condensers to record guitar and cymbals without having to spend too much money right away, so I ordered these. They seemed like exactly what I needed. Eager to try them out, I first set them up to record my acoustic guitar. One aimed at the fingerboard, one aimed at the soundhole, I recorded in stereo and was amazed at the sound I got without even having to experiment any with my mic positioning. If you want to hear an example, search Robert Bassett Acoustic Guitar Recording Example on SoundCloud. I can't link to it in a review, but you should be able to find it easily. That recording I got is exactly the signal I got coming in, without doing any EQing or anything. The excess noise is due to the environment I recorded in, me breathing, and my laptop's crappy soundcard, not the microphones. You can hear the full range it picks up, and even the decent bass response. The closer I positioned the mic to the soundhole, the greater the bass response.

I tried drums a few weeks later, and that was when I really fell in love. I had these guys set up over the drums to capture the cymbals and whole kit, as well as mics on the hi-hat, snare, and kick drum. After listening back to the sound I got, I realized how well the Samson's were picking up the kit on their own, so I ended up pulling out the mics on the hi-hat and snare, and just using a mic for the bass drum and the Samsons for the rest of the kit. The kit we recorded with didn't have the greatest cymbals on it but you couldn't tell that from the recordings we got. The Samson's made them sound crystal clear.

Another few weeks later, I tried capturing a baby grand. I positioned the pair about 5 inches back from the hammers and 5 inches up from the strings, one aimed at the lower strings, one aimed at the higher strings recording in stereo again. The recordings I got were awesome, and their wide frequency response picked up each note beautifully throughout the full range of the piano. I just used another condenser five feet or so back from the piano to capture the room sound, and a little reverb of course, and I was more than pleased with the recordings I got from such an affordably priced pair of mics. I would have payed much much more for these.

So basically, if you're looking for a matched pair of condensers for recording stereo, you really shouldn't look any further than these. For a little over a hundred bucks, they really took my recordings to the next level. Their wide frequency response makes them excellent for use in any application. And the carrying case they come in is really handy too. I didn't think I'd use it since I already have a case for my mics, but I ended up using it anyways since they fit so nice in it.

Oh and no i'm not affiliated with Samson in any way, I just fell in love with these mics haha. Feel free to leave a comment if you have any questions, i'm not an expert or anything but i'll do my best to tell you my experiences i've had with them.
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