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Samba Esquema Novo (Lp+cd) [VINYL]

Jorge Ben, Jorge Ben Jor Vinyl
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
Price: £20.51 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
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Product details

  • Vinyl (21 April 2014)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Doxy Records
  • ASIN: B00J2HMCOO
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 39,113 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Bossa Nova pure! 28 July 2014
Format:MP3 Download|Verified Purchase
Jorge Ben is one of the originators of what we all know now as bossa nova. Samba Esquema Novo is his first album, from 1964, and contains among other delights the original version of Mas Que Nada, which he wrote. The whole album is full of great tunes, delivered by Jorge against light jazz arrangements. Recommended to lovers of Brazilian music who might have overlooked Jorge Ben.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 9 July 2014
Format:Vinyl|Verified Purchase
Classic album from the master a must for lovers of brasilian music
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Jorge Ben's first album, from 1963 1 Jan 2002
By DJ Joe Sixpack - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Marvellous. A long overdue and reasonably priced reissue of Jorge Ben's dazzling debut album. This album helped revitalize Brazilian pop at a time when the bossa nova craze had largely played itself out... This record opens with his version of "Mas, Que Nada," the hit song that made Jorge Ben and internationally known songwriter. Here Ben works with several of the best samba-jazz and pop bandleaders of the bossa era, including Maestro Gaya, Meirelles, and Luiz Carlos Vinha... Combined with Ben's sleek vocals, each arranger spins magic. Some of the best songs on here, such as "Vem, Morena, Vem," have been neglected over the years, while others such as "Chove Chuva" are perennial favorites. Listening to the album in its entirety is highly recommended -- it not only captures a bright new voice coming through at a special moment in time, it also just sounds great as a cohesive piece of work. Highly recommended.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More Musical Gold 31 Dec 2012
By Gerald Brennan - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Getting into new music is a lot like prospecting for gold. (Granted, all I know about the latter is from watching Treasure of the Sierra Madre and reading some Jack London novels twenty-odd years ago, but bear with me here.) You might strike off on your own, intent on discovering everything unaided, but after a while wandering through the wastelands (for music, the FM dial), you're more inclined to start listening to excited rumors from others who have gone before. You may end up spending a lot of time in dark caverns (for music, dive bars) trying to find something undiscovered and valuable. Often, you have to carefully sift through what you already have (in gold mining, the sluice boxes; in music, the albums you downloaded a month or two but only listened to once) to see if you've misestimated its worth. And every so often, you find a nugget of pure gold, something whose value is immediately apparent; you feel a strange mix of exhilaration and fear, because you're glad to have this great new thing, but you don't know whether this new vein will keep paying off or play itself out (which is what happens, say, when you're really into the Rolling Stones and then you start buying their albums from the early 80s).

Given the fact that I've already mined most of the veins in the English-speaking world, I set out for the jungles of Brazil (metaphorically speaking) some time ago based on credible rumors of musical riches there, rumors spread by the likes of Beck and Nirvana. My first map was a Tropicalia compilation album recommended by Spin; a later and far more comprehensive guide was Rolling Stone of Brazil's list of that country's 100 best albums. It's proven fairly reliable so far, and it's led me to a mother lode--Jorge Ben.

This is the third album of his I've bought; after each album, I've worried that nothing else of his would compare. And yet, based on the word of others, and their frustrating inability to come to a consensus on his best albums, I've pressed on, and been rewarded each time. (I feel like I did when I stumbled onto classic-period Stones, or the Kinks, or Miles Davis, or Bob Dylan, or Radiohead--abundantly blessed with an embarrassment of riches far too great to fit in a greatest hits compilation.)

Its brilliance is instantly evident. The horns and drums hook you immediately--it's one of those rare albums that grabs you from the first seconds of the first listen and leaves such a lasting impression that you find yourself reaching for it afterwards, feeling a little incomplete without it. (The nearest equivalent I can think of for instant impact is A Tribe Called Quest's Low End Theory.) And yet "Mas, Que Nada!" is not just a great first track--it's a harbinger of things to come, a stellar introductory track to a superlative album that launched a musical career as prolific and profoundly awesome as any musician on the planet. The arrangements are subtle but intricate, jazzy and bossa nova-y; Ben's voice flutters about like a beautiful tropical bird, particularly on the title track and "Tim Dom Dom" and "A Tamba."

If you're anything like me, you have a lot of friends who are constantly prospecting for the best music the world has to offer. And if you get this album, you, too, will find yourself jabbering enthusiastically to all who will listen about the treasures contained inside--sounding crazy, perhaps, but knowing you've once again struck gold.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The beggining 5 Sep 2006
By Nuno Leal Da Silva - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
The first album and already a masterpiece, that's the way Jorge Ben is. Strongly recommended, full of world known songs loke Mas que nada and Chuva, his unique voice is one of Brazilian and world music most powerful manifest to beauty. After this more raw and simple, check out two more complex albums and for me their masterpieces - Tábua de Esmeralda and Africa Brasil (for those two, 6 stars :)))
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The King!!!!!!! 22 Mar 2004
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
"Mas, que nada", was the first song written by Ben. Can you believe? This album is a prelude of a brilliant career. The three first solo albums (Samba esquema novo, Sacundim Ben Samba and Ben é samba bom) ,the period 1969-1976 (8 albums: From Jorge Ben to Solta o Pavão), and the 1979-81 period (out of Polygram) marked the climax of the brazilian music.
Jorge Ben: The TRUE genius.
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