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Sacrilege

Can Audio CD
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
Price: 40.00
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Biography

Can was an experimental rock band formed in Cologne, West Germany in 1968. Later labeled as one of the first "krautrock" groups, they transcended mainstream influences and incorporated strong minimalist and world music elements into their often psychedelic music.

Can constructed their music largely through collective spontaneous composition –– which the band ... Read more in Amazon's Can Store

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Product details

  • Audio CD (12 May 1997)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: EMI
  • ASIN: B000026ZL2
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 114,788 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. Pnoom (Moon Up Mix)
2. Spoon (Sonic Youth Mix)
3. Blue Bag (Inside Paper) (Toroid Mix)
4. Tango Whiskeyman (A Guy Called Gerald Mix)
5. Tv Spot (Bruce Gilbert Mix)
6. Vitamin C (U.N.K.L.E. Mix)
7. Halleluwah (Halleluwa Orbus 2)
8. Oh Yeah (Sunroof Mix)
Disc: 2
1. Unfinished (Hiller/Kaiser/Leda Mix)
2. Future Days (Blade Runner Mix)
3. ....And More (Westbam Mix)
4. Father Cannot Yell (Pete Shelley/Black Radio Mix)
5. Dizzy, Spoon (System 7 Mix)
6. Yoo Doo Right (3p Mix)
7. Flow Motion (Air Liquide Mix)
8. Oh Yeah (Secret Knowledge Mix)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Remix project of Krautrock gods... 20 Jan 2007
By Jason Parkes #1 HALL OF FAME
Format:Audio CD
Released in 1997 and aligned to the material found on the lovely Can DVD released a few years ago, `Sacrilege' is a remix project centring on one of the most evolutionary bands of all time, the mighty Can. The core line-up of Holger Czukay, Irmin Schmidt, Jaki Liebezeit & the late Michael Karoli appeared to approve of this approach taken towards their material - evident in the sleeve notes and on the documentary part of the Can DVD (& also the highly amusing video of Westbam's take on `I Want More' that the foursome cut an amusing rug to). Like Bill Laswell's retake of late 60s/early 70s Miles Davis `Panthalassa', the similar `Mutant TG' remix of Throbbing Gristle works & the second disc of Gang of Four's `Return the Gift' there is a very contemporary feel to the tracks here - with Can I'm still not sure if it is the remixer or the work that is being remixed?

The title, explained by Schmidt in the DVD documentary, nods to some people's idea of what remixing Can appeared to tantamount: sacrilege. Daniel Miller points out that certain key Can fans from the world of rock and roll declined the offer of remixing - Mark E Smith, Julian Cope, John Lydon. They appeared to have thought the originals were untouchable, which is more than fair enough, and something Brian Eno appears to have wrestled with according to his sleeve notes here (all the remixers say a little something). But the originals are all lovingly restored and remastered and thoroughly available - this is a bonus take on the mighty Can, which is not for everyone but feels thoroughly necessary. Especially when many recent acts nod their way - Primal Scream (`Burning Wheel's intro is `Future Days'!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Groovy, quirky, gets better every time 12 Jan 2004
Format:Audio CD
This is a great album, full of interesting details and quirky ideas. Some tracks are more obviously songs than others, but there's plenty of variety. I'm only familiar with a small amount of Can's work, so I can't vouch for how much has changed in these remixed versions, but the tracks I am familiar with seem to have changed drmatically.
For instance, Future Days, one of my favourites, is barely recognisable and seems to have been overlaid with a tune and beat that puts it in a completely different key, if you can imagine that. However, this may be what they meant when they titled the album Sacrilege - certainly this version of Future Days is no gentle reworking, it's ripped to bits. But I like it, and the rest of the album is a real grower.
Buy it - but be prepared to rethink your favourite Can tracks.
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2.0 out of 5 stars An Apt Title, Perhaps. 13 Nov 2013
By MJB
Format:Audio CD
I'm a great fan of remixing, one of the most interesting aspects of modern music. However, just like an old-fashioned cover version of a song, to be successful a remix has to be different from the original yet at least as good, which is often quite something to pull off.

It is interesting to learn that some of those approached declined the opportunity to put their own stamp on a Can track, but I think that they probably made the right decision. Now it may just be that I have been listening to Can for over 40 years, but it seems to me that the majority of these versions fall short of the standards mentioned in the above paragraph and often seem to merely trivialise the originals.

Of course -as Brian Eno effectively says in the CD booklet- taking on things that were very good in their original form means that you are setting yourself quite a challenge. It is often the case that films which worked well in their original form are remade, while those which still have some potential for development are ignored and perhaps the same thing has happened here?

Still, the band like it in the main, so as with most things (and especially music) it's all down to personal taste. I think I'm with Damo Suzuki though, who simply says, "It's not my tea".
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.3 out of 5 stars  6 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, but could've been a lot better 24 Feb 2002
By "tobemilo" - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
There seems to be two different opinons on this CD:
The prog rock fans say that the music is too much like "boring modern electronic dance music", and the people into modern electronic music find the remixes "dated" and I admit that most of the remixes aren't exactly cutting edge.
Personally I find some of the remixes interesting, but a lot of it is rather boring and nothing on this double CD can be called essential. My favourites are "Yoo doo right" (because it must be one of the hardest tracks in the Can discography to remix, but they really succeed and do a version that is as far away from the original that's possible), "Oh yeah (the Sunroof mix) and "Tango Whiskeyman". The last track mentioned has absolutely nothing to do with the Can song, by the way, although it has some bits and pieces from the track "Gomorrha" (found on "Unlimited Edition") in it.
The fact that a lot of reviewers claim the Brian Eno remix of "Pnoom" as one of their favourites says quite a lot of the contents of this album. Actually, it's not a remix at all but just pieces of the track cut up and re-assembled in a different order. But I could listen to those funky drums in "Pnoom" all day long so I don't really mind...
I enjoy hearing the classic basslines of Holger Czukay and the metronomic drums of Jaki Leibezeit in any context, so this album provides quite a lot of pleasant listening although it never reaches the heights of the original albums, such as "Tago Mago" or "Future Days".
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Can - 'Sacrilege: The Remixes' (Mute) 5 Aug 2007
By Mike Reed - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
So nice to finally catch this 2-CD title priced under the retail price of $18.95. Total of sixteen classic Can compositions that've been been given a complete make-over (in some cases) to give true casual Can fans and die-hards something else to listen to on a spare evening. Remix jobs that I, personally got the most out of were "Spoon" redone by Sonic Youth, "Vitamin C" by U.N.K.L.E., a good version of "Oh Yeah" by Sunroof, "Future Days" given the works from Blade Runner and "Dizzy Spoon" by Steve Hillage and System 7. 'Sacriledge' is obviously more in a industrial direction. Some might say this 2-CD is strictly for completists. Maybe so, but it's still good.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars of course this isn't CAN . . . 20 Nov 2002
By "richlatta" - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
. . . this is merely an extention of Can. If you take this album in the spirit of exploration that the band embodied so well, you will reap wonderful rewards. Most of this album is techno-oriented. Sometimes they use their own beats then inject samples from Can songs and manipulate them, other times they use the Can beats as the foundation, or use both. Some songs are pulled off better than others, but all are intrigueing. If you're a techno wiz, you might not consider this music cutting edge, but it's definatly deeper than your average deep house. The raw material itself greatly elevates this album. Much of it is pretty transcendental, especially if you're familiar with the original Can songs because your mind bends as they get manipulated. Particularly in the shroomed-out slow down of "Spoon" mixed by Sonic Youth and the Gareth Jones/Daniel Miller mix of "Oh Yeah" is pretty trippy too. The Bruce Gilbert mix of "TV Spot" isn't techno at all, but what sounds like a really bizarre call of the wild - you have to hear it to know what I mean.
As a bonus, the liner notes with quotes from the remixers every member of Can are pretty cool. And Can themselves like this album (except for Damo Suzuki - not his "tea") so that should certainly tell you something.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars So what if the "traditional rock lovers" felt insulted..... 14 Nov 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I have to say that most of the efforts on this project actually work, and can be very enjoying if listened to with an open mind.
Can was all about exploration and the fact that they have a re-mix comp. will never take away from their original work but rather a interesting homage to a great band by focusing in on the ideas that Can express (now Faust has a re-mix that just came out). One shouldn't compair and constrast the songs and their new alterations. Many of the producers of the redone tracks are from groundbreaking groups (not some lame techno or downtempo hacks)like B.C. Gilbert (Wire) Sonic Youth, Daniel Miller (Mute Rec. founder), Pete Shelly (Buzzcocks) Brian Eno, etc.
If you can afford to try something new then check it out. If it will kill you to hear the tracks "destoryed" then stay away.
2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Out of sight and snowblind 27 Feb 2000
By loteq - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This album is a good example for boring pseudo-avantgarde music. In the '70s, Can were a highly experimental band and always two steps ahead of contemporary rock music. This remix collection, unfortunately, is three steps behind the work of contemporary techno artists like Aphex Twin, Autechre, and Photek. Despite of the participation of well-known techno-heads like The Orb, System 7, and Westbam, it's unbelievable how formulaic and uninspired the release mostly is. Best efforts here are Brian Eno's funny version of "Pnoom", "Oh yeah" with its uptempo acid house rhythm, Carl Craig's atmospheric mix of "Future days", and 3P's more pop-oriented "Yoo doo right" with some soulful vocals. You can forget the rest, which is made of standardized techno beats, lame ambient soundscapes, and lots of senseless noise loops. Absolutely dull electronic music, masquerading as something important and futuristic. If you're looking for a compilation featuring the original versions, check out "Anthology" and "Cannibalism I-III".
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