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SAS Operation Storm: Nine men against four hundred Hardcover – 18 Aug 2011

4.5 out of 5 stars 60 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton; First Edition, First Impression edition (18 Aug. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1444726951
  • ISBN-13: 978-1444726954
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 3 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (60 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 365,899 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'An excellent and detailed account'. (RUSI Review)

The time is now right for their bravery, at long last, to be properly recognised. (Lord Ashcroft, KCMG, Sunday Times)

Book Description

The Inside Story of the SAS's most famous battle - nine men against four hundred - told for the first time by the men who were there.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
My SAS nut husband bought me this as a joke birthday present and in order to annoy him I decided to pretend to read it so he couldn't get his hot litte hands on it.
To my utter amazement I actually started really enjoying it!
The subject matter isn't one that would normally appeal, blood and battles and all, but the way its written actually makes it really interesting.
Not too much military hardware detail but the real human story behind the conflict and the men who fought so amazingly bravely against such enormous odds.
So ladies; if you feel like moving outside your literary comfort zone this is definitely the book for you.
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Format: Hardcover
Having recently visited southern Oman, and the site of the key battle of Mirbat, I was delighted to see this account had been released. I don't normally read military books, but this was really hard to put down. The story includes information on the background to the conflict painting a vivid picture of life in Oman at the time, and the people who lived there. I thoroughly recommend this book.
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Format: Paperback
Published in paperback 2012. 308 pages with 12 pages of index. This book deals with a small war in a faraway place, to paraphrase Michael BURLEIGH. In November 1967 the British left Aden with the withdrawal of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders under Colonel Colin 'Mad Mitch' Mitchell. Aden became the capital of the socialist / communist republic of South Yemen. Next door was the Sultanate Oman, of significant strategic importance controlling the Strait of Hormuz. In 1970 the Sandhurst educated Sultan Qaboos overthrew his father. The Russian and Chinese backed South Yemen started a uprising in Dhofar, a region of SW Oman. The British supported Qaboos with ‘military aid’ but no public acknowledgement that UK combat troops were in Oman. This book deals with an attack by 100s of rebels on the outpost of Mirhat in the Dhofar region near the border with South Yemen. It describes in detail the heroics of the SAS, local tribesmen and Omani police who, against overwhelming odds, prevailed against the insurgents.

The book approaches the subject from 4 viewpoints – a geopolitical history of the region, a slightly breathless blow by blow account of the battle, the failure of the successive UK governments to properly acknowledge the heroism of the SAS and the tribesmen on the side of Qaboos and a discussion of the geopolitical situation following the battle.

The writing style is a little bit gung ho Boys Own Paper, Kiplingesque almost. The argot of the SAS is heavily used, male genitals are known as ‘small artillery’, SAS weapons gave them ‘raw fire power’ and ‘showered hot metal on the enemy’, bullets hitting rocks gave rise to ‘shards of stone and freshly minted dust’ and at an SAS briefing there was ‘enough stomach acid to melt a bucket of nails’!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a must read for all fans of tales of heroism. The battle of Mirbat is well known to people interested in the SAS, but little detail has ever been published of this amazing story.

A great tale well told with typical regiment sense of humour and lack of bull***t READ THIS BOOK and feel humble but proud of what was done by a tiny number of dedicated men against Rorkes Drift type odds. Deserved a handfull of VC's but as the operation was unoffical no open recognition was given.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This book is easy to read. However, I found the verbatim repetition of some material quite disconcerting at times - I had to check that I hadn't skipped back a few pages by accident. Like another reviewer I didn't find the use of physics very helpful as a metaphor - confusing the Second Law of Thermodynamics with Newton's Laws (of Motion) and neither of them appropriate to the point being made. If you want more of the historical background then Storm Front might be more to your taste. That said, I think it was very readable and it is clear that the SAS soldiers who fought in Oman - not just those engaged in the Battle of Mirbat - deserve much more recognition, if only in terms of military decorations. The book claims that only SAS soldiers who came from infantry units could receive military honours, which seems very perverse to me. Of course, while virtually all SAS soldiers were deployed to Oman for a while, soldiers wearing other cap badges and members of the other armed forces were involved, as well as contract pilots who had finished their military careers in the UK or elsewhere and they deserve recognition too. This was a critical time in the history of Oman - the present sultan had just sent his father into exile in a coup d-etat and the country was vulnerable to outside forces. Neighbouring Yemen had just fallen to the communists, who were supporting the Adoo (enemy) in Oman. Oman sits on the Strait of Hormuz and so is still strategically important. Helping to win the war in favour of the present sultan has allowed Oman to undergo significant development, which has benefited its population.
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Format: Kindle Edition
The story is special. I've allways wanted to know it better. And it drives forward the book.

But I'm a history buff. And I would never recommend this book to anyone.

The writing is embarasing. Don't there exist proof reading ediors anymore?
The brits is a nation of history buffs, but too often there is more "buff" than taste: This writing made me embarassed.
If this book is ever printed in a third edition, these changes ought to be done:
1) Use a text editor; find all adjectives and phrases that has a potential of being a cliche. Write them up on a big white board. Make sure none of them is used more than once. And erase the rest from the book.
2) Never write anything a second or third time, as if it is the first time the reader encounter it in the story.
3) Don't try to build up the climax of the book, ...once every second page. It's just transparent and embarassing. (I feel sorry for the real guys.)
4) Double check all adjectives mercilessly. If you call one guy "brilliant", and four pages later tell how little common sence he had; why did you then use the word brilliant? Was it on a list of adjectives you had to put into the book? Or were you writing for the family? -- It is transparent that it has to be either of the two.

And: Newton never made any laws about thermodynamics. They were made hundred years after he died. Did you mean the second law about thermodynamics, about antropy? Or did you mean Newton's third law, but you had once heard about a "second" law in thermodynamics. Either way, it wasn't very descriebing on what the next sentences descriebed. -- It was only to impress the reader, wasn't it?
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