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Sátántangó [1994] [DVD]


Price: £12.48 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Only 2 left in stock.
Sold by A2Z Entertains and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
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£12.48 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 2 left in stock. Sold by A2Z Entertains and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Sátántangó [1994] [DVD] + The Béla Tarr Collection [DVD] + The Turin Horse [DVD]
Price For All Three: £32.98

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Product details

  • Actors: Peter Berling, Janos Derzsi, Mihaly Vig, Erzsebet Gaal, Miklos Szekely
  • Directors: Bela Tarr
  • Format: Box set, PAL, Widescreen
  • Language: Hungarian
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 3
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Artificial Eye
  • DVD Release Date: 13 Nov 2006
  • Run Time: 450 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000HRLWQM
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 10,941 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Seven-hour black-and-white epic following life in a small, dilapidated post-Communist Hungarian village where nothing ever happens and nobody wants to be there. Adapted from a novel by László Krasznahorkai, the saga is presented through chapters looking at life from the viewpoint of each of the different villagers, all of whom want to leave as soon as they recieve a much-anticipated cash payment they are expecting. The film won the Caligari Film Prize as well as the Ecumenical Jury Prize Special Mention at the 1994 Berlin International Film Festival.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Alan Pavelin VINE VOICE on 25 Nov 2006
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I saw the first two-thirds of this film in the cinema (the last third went on too late for me) and its DVD release has provided the opportunity to experience the whole thing, courtesy of the admirable distributor Artificial Eye. The film is regarded by critics I admire, like Jonathan Rosenbaum and the late Susan Sontag, as one of the greatest of the modern era, and I wholeheartedly agree.

I am quite out of sympathy with Tarr's deeply pessimistic and anarchic view of the world, specifically of post-Communist Hungary (which admittedly I do not know). But I can forgive him all that, because of the mesmerisingly stunning black-and-white compositions, ultra-slow zooms and pans, eerily ominous music, and starkly beautiful lighting effects which he achieves in his extraordinar(il)y long takes.

You will either love or hate Tarr's films. Just watch the first few minutes (invariably a single take) of any of them and you will know which camp you are in. Of the 3 others available on DVD in the UK, Werckmeister Harmonies begins with a group of drunken people in a bar acting out the sun, moon, and Earth in their revolutions and orbits; Damnation with huge coal-buckets clanking along high wires like cable-cars; and The Man From London with the bow of a ship moving excruciatingly slowly. The opening shot of Satantango stretches patience to the limit; in an 8-minute prelude we watch a herd of cows slowly amble their way out of a shed and across muddy ground, behind some shabby buildings, and into a field. Each film is imbued with a sense of menace and foreboding, of some undefined apocalyptic threat.

The situation of Satantango is as follows. Two members of a farm collective are planning to run off with the money.
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41 of 44 people found the following review helpful By HJ on 10 April 2007
Format: DVD
A collective farm in disarray. A messianic agitator. And lots of mud & rain. Yes, it's the infamous 7 hour movie, all in Bela Tarr's trademark style: arty black & white cinematography, long slow takes, tracking shots & zooms. The style recalls Tarkovsky but the sensibility is completely different - relentlessly downbeat, squalid & cynical, a bit like Aki Kaurismaki without the jokes. So you get a doctor drinking himself to death, a cat being tortured & a suicidal little girl taking rat poison - all depicted in slow real time takes. It's uncomfortable viewing not because it's boring but because it gets almost too intense.

This is definitely film making of the highest order with stunning images & a very clever interlocking narrative structure, but I found Satantango harder going than his earlier film Damnation. That film had a more focused setting, plot & characterisation whereas Satantango is rather weighed down with enigmatic surrealism & allegorical overtones. I hesitate to recommend Satantango - various criticisms could be levelled at the film & it is certainly not for the uninitiated, but if you know Bela Tarr's work (particularly if you enjoyed Werckmeister Harmonies) or have an interest in good old European art house cinema then you should get this DVD - it's a unique film for sure.

(Nice to see some of the other Amazon reviews here are complaining that the film is too short!)
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By david ruane on 14 April 2009
Format: DVD
Just incredible, it touches something deep within. There are moments in this film that are incredibly painful to watch, particularly involving the young child but in the end somehow you feel closer to the pain and the beauty of what it is to be human. It is an absolute masterpiece of cinema and poetry. If a film last 7 hours and you want to watch it all again to immerse yourself in what it says and somehow feel you understand life more then it is doing something beyond words and beyond cinema.
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48 of 52 people found the following review helpful By Nobody VINE VOICE on 26 Dec 2006
Format: DVD
I'm not going to bore you with the details of the `story' because first of all nothing really happens and secondly it's not important. Mostly its just people looking in and out of windows, walking, or just being, yet that may be what we're doing also by sitting for 7 hours, watching other people by transcending the barrier of celluloid and sharing in their misery. They say the eyes are the windows of the soul and in these Breughelian faces we see the personality of characters shine through and understand their individual and personal agony. This is what elevates this film beyond cinema and art into something more personal like the experience of music. By the end of the film characters feel like real people that we may intimately know.

Parallels are inevitably drawn with the work other directors like Tarkovsky, most notably `Andrei Rublev' (1966) and `Stalker' (1979). Tarkovsky's films had a sense of religious hope whereas Bela Tarr's have none of that yet I felt a certain amount of elation at the end. Albert Camus said that struggling to the height may be enough to fill a man's heart. How true.

This is a film I've waited several years to see since I first saw `Werkmeister Harmonies' (2000) and `Damnation' (1988) on the Artificial Eye DVD release. Rumour circulated for a long time about this eventual release and finally we have it. It's a film more have heard about than actually seen and has always been highly revered among cineastes. Satantango is filled with some of the most remarkable cinematography I've ever seen. So was it worth the wait? Absolutely.

Bela Tarr may be the greatest living director working today.

Highly recommended viewing.
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