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Running Through Corridors: 1 Paperback – 14 Dec 2010


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Running Through Corridors: 1 + About Time: 1963-1966 Seasons 1 to 3 (About Time; The Unauthorized Guide to Dr. Who (Mad Norwegian Press))
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Product details

  • Paperback: 323 pages
  • Publisher: Mad Norwegian Press (14 Dec. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1935234064
  • ISBN-13: 978-1935234067
  • Product Dimensions: 22.6 x 15 x 2.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 439,005 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Paperback. Pub Date: December 2010 Pages: 336 Publisher: Mad Norwegian Press In Running Through Corridors. two Doctor Who lovers of old - Robert Shearman. Toby Hadoke - embark on an epic quest of friendship: Spend the 'gap year' of 2009 (when Doctor Who consisted of a handful of specials rather than a full season) re-watching the whole of Who two episodes a day. every day. from the show's start in 1963 and ending with David Tennant's swan song on New Year's. 2010 . This three-volume series contains Shearman and Hadoke's diary of that experience - a grand opus of their wry observations about the show. their desire to see the good in every story. and their chronicle of the real-life changes to Who in that year . With this book. Who fans will feel that they're watching along with Shearman (World Fantasy Award winner. Hugo Award nominee and writer on the new Doctor Who) and Hado...

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Ryan Christensen on 17 Mar. 2011
Format: Paperback
After having loved those volumes of the About Time series pertaining to the first two decades of DW, I had wished to find something equally absorbing on the subject, and was happy to find it in this. But where those books sometimes read (albeit in a brilliant and hilarious way) as a list of faults, here the authors focus on the the positive - and this they do with considerable insight and obvious love for the show. One of those books you really want to give the authors a hearty "Thank you" for writing.

About Time 1: The Unauthorized Guide to Doctor Who - Seasons 1 to 3 (About Time Series)
About Time 2: The Unauthorized Guide to Doctor Who: 1966-1969, Seasons 4 to 6 (About Time)
About Time 3: The Unauthorized Guide to Doctor Who (Seasons 7 to 11) [2nd Edition]
About Time 4: The Unauthorized Guide to Doctor Who (Seasons 12 to 17) (About Time Series) (About Time; The Unauthorized Guide to Dr. Who (Mad Norwegian Press))
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By L. A. Hardy VINE VOICE on 18 April 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Rob Shearman is an entertaining writer, as is Toby Hadoke. Their somewhat insane plan to watch all of the episodes of Dr Who (lost or otherwise) right from the very beginning over the space of a year is lovingly chronicled episode per episode in this first volume, which covers the 1960s. Further decades will be covered in two future volumes.

As well as brief descriptions of the episodes watched, the vignettes cover impressions, recollections & occasional everyday flotsam and jetsam in an easy-going style. Unless you're a diehard Who fan, you won't have seen all of the episodes discussed, so probably the best way to approach this book is to read it bit by bit after watching the stories you can get hold of on DVD. You won't necessarily agree with either author, but you should enjoy wallowing in fandom with them.

Roll on the next two volumes...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By James Bland on 2 April 2012
Format: Paperback
I have just finished reading this book. I thoroughly enjoyed it. It was great to get the positive comments from the two authors, and it is written with gentle humour.

There are a couple of negative points for me.

Firstly the pair comment on the mistake of the production crew having the character of the Doctor referred to as "Doctor Who", and yet this is also a crime (punishable by use of the mind probe if I got my way!) that the authors of this book are guilty of (Robert Shearman states on page 319 "it was the merry contrast of seeing Doctor Who scolding his irresponsible little brother" - the most recent example I have read).

Secondly, the editing of the book is rather poor. There are numerous typos, jumbled up sentences and repeated words. Sometimes the meaning of a sentence is lost until you work out the order it should have been in, or delete the appropriate repeated word. An example from "The War Games" would be "...the writers allow every him to represent every other frightened Tommy..." (Page 317), which should read "...the writers allow him to represent every other frightened Tommy...". This is just the final one I remember, having been read most recently, but such errors crop up through out the book.

I realise that in this review I have concentrated more on the negative aspects of the book (which is at odds with the book itself), but I would still give it 5 out of 5 as it is a great read, just let down a little by poor editing. As with "Doctor Who" itself, it would be a shame to down-grade great writing because of shoddy production values.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Keen Reader TOP 50 REVIEWER on 15 May 2014
Format: Paperback
Starting on 1 January 2009, Robert Shearman and Toby Hadoke decided to (individually) watch each and every episode (and movie) of the Doctor Who series and record their views on each episode as they progressed. This first volume is the result of their viewing of the 1960s episodes of Doctor Who, stories which featured William Hartnell as the First Doctor and Patrick Troughton as the Second Doctor (also the Doctor Who movies of the 1960s). The stories covered go from the very first William Hartnell story (An Unearthly Child) to the last appearance of Patrick Troughton as the Second Doctor in The War Games.

Being lifelong Doctor Who fans, the authors are well placed to offer holistic views of each of the episodes, trying to view them as they would have been viewed on their very first screening by an audience to whom everything was new (not like us jaded Doctor Who fans who’ve seen, analysed, dissected and discussed every episode several hundred times over), and to place each episode in the context of Doctor Who canonicity and continuinty as we now know it.

Some of the stories and episodes I remember vividly; some not so much. And it’s refreshing as well as entertaining to read others’ views of the stories, and indeed the individual episodes that made up those stories. In some of these earlier stories, there may have been 4, 6 or even more episodes that made up a story, so there was plenty of time for exposition, plot development, character development and cliffhangers that seem to be missing from some of the more recent episodes of Doctor Who – a pity for the modern series in my view.
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