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The Rules of Attraction Paperback – 1 Apr 2011


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Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Picador; Reprints edition (1 April 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330536346
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330536349
  • Product Dimensions: 13.1 x 2.2 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 39,055 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Bret Easton Ellis is also the author of Less Than Zero, The Rules of Attraction, American Psycho, The Informers, Glamorama, Lunar Park and Imperial Bedrooms, and his work has been translated into twenty-seven languages. He lives in Los Angeles.

Product Description

Review

"Inspired. A wonderfully comic novel." --Gore Vidal "Ellis is, first and last, a moralist. Under cover of his laconic voice, every word in his [novels] springs from grieving outrage at our spiritual condition." --"Los Angeles Times Book Review" "Serves to establish Mr. Ellis's reputation further as one of the primary inside sources in upper-middle-class America's continuing investigation of what has happened to its children." --"The New York Times Book Review"

About the Author

Bret Easton Ellis is the author of five novels and a collection of stories, which have been translated into twenty-seven languages. He divides his time between Los Angeles and New York.

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By C. Lochhead on 13 Feb. 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was the first Bret Easton Ellis book I'd read, so I wasn't sure on what to expect, but the book didn't disappoint. In fact it has made me stick a few more of his books in my Amazon wish list.

The start of the book sets the tone for the characters. It starts mid-sentence like your just dropping in on the book, and it ends mid-sentence, as if you just drift off not really caring about what has happened. This juxtaposition works very well and helps show the characters true essence.

Are money and drugs ruining the world? After reading "The Rules of Attraction" you will certainly believe so. The wild times, out-of-control students and disregard for anything other than oneself, doesn't paint a very pretty picture.

The story revolves around three main characters, Sean, Paul and Lauren. All rich, beautiful and delusional. Which attribute describes them best is hard to tell. As you go deeper the characters become entangled in various situations, some more serious than others. But all with the same terrible, depressing & soul-less attitude.

As the old cliche goes, after I started I didn't want to stop. A great read.
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31 of 33 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 Nov. 2001
Format: Paperback
Having read all of BEE's work, I believe this is the best example of his misunderstood genius. A complex, subtle and strangely poignant account of American college life in the 1980's, played out through three first-person narrators who show us the world through disillusioned, disaffected eyes. The characterisation is expertly done, and in the end we are left feeling a strange empathy with these hollow lives. It begins in the middle of a sentence and ends in the middle of a sentence, and true, nothing much happens in between, but this is a book about characters, not plot. Style truly reflects content, and the effect is to immerse you totally in the world being portrayed...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jacques COULARDEAU on 28 Oct. 2009
Format: Paperback
We all know the masterpiece of that author, viz. American Psycho (please watch the uncut unrated video version: the extra five minutes make a real difference), and I was curious to see what he had become with time and age. This novel is situated in the same period as the one that made his fame, the mid 80s, under Ronald Reagan, the time of the emergence of financial capitalism, or shouldn't I say the emergence of speculative stock exchange financial greedy deregulated adventure. We are dealing here with the children of the first generation of these speculators who were inventing that golden boy and yippy/yuppy age that was just being born under our eyes. The children are all in college doing anything you may think of from drama to poetry, from art to just nothing. They do not plan on getting any real competence or skill in the social field of productivity and the economy. They are just expressing, satisfying and even trying to satiate their unfathomable hunger and thirst for anything that is not advised by moral and ethical authorities in the American world or what's more that is heavily not recommended and harshly rejected, i.e. drugs from cocaine to mushroom and all kinds of other grass, substance or concoction that could get you high or just wasted; then alcohol for the very purpose of being drunk as long as possible, forever if possible (And there they are creative like champagne on the rocks or rum diet coke, and some other barbaric mixtures); and of course sex, sex and sex. The book is in fact detailed only at that level and explores all kinds of possible orientations from plain gay to plain straight and all the variations, nuances, hues and other shades in-between for both girls and boys. In fact the book is becoming obsessive about male homosexuality with a few characters.Read more ›
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By AnnaS on 27 Dec. 2010
Format: Paperback
I understand those who say it is a completely meaningsless book, because it really is a book about nothing and I completely get those who say that it is absolutely brilliant, because it is about nothing and still leaves you with something. Reading The Rules of Attraction is like listening to a friend who tells you too much of what you don't want to hear and while he/she is talking and talking you realize that he/she got it all wrong, everything, the whole life, but you really can't do much about it because he/she is too far off for you to even bother.

Bret Easton Ellis lets a couple of college students (mostly Sean, Paul and Lauren) talk about their completely meaningless existance of sex, drugs and parties. What is fascinating here is to get the different perspectives of different people involved in the same love triangle and to see how the same situations, words and actions are perscieved completely differenty depending on what the person wants it to be. As the satirical elements were too hidden for me to find the book funny and the characters too unengaging to find it tragic, it were exactly those glimpses of hope and complete denial that made the book interesting to me.

Would I recommend The Rules of Attraction to my friends? Not really. But maybe I don't have the right kind of friends.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Oliver Foster Standring on 15 Feb. 2008
Format: Paperback
This was the second book by Easton Ellis that I read (after american psycho) and focuses on the complicated lives of three characters caught up in a nasty love triangle (square? pentagon?) It slowly leaks information regarding the personas and backgrounds of the characters and does a good job of drawing you in, and putting you behind their eyes so to speak. For me the best thing about Ellis' works are the way the characters are linked, for example, one of the three primary characters in the rules of attraction, Sean Bateman, is the the brother of American psycho Pat Bateman (Sean stars in that book, for about 4 lines, and Pat is mentioned in this) Likewise, the love of one of the other leads lives, Victor, is the main character in Glamourama. These links are ingenious and very subtly deployed. From the second I clocked that Sean was Pat Batemans brother, I was hooked, and read all the rest of Easton Ellis' novels. I havent been dissapointed with a single one of them. Whilst this isnt as good as American Psycho, it stands alongside Glamorama, and above less than zero. A worthy read!
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