Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Shop Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Shop Now Shop now
A Rough Ride to the Future and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £16.99
  • You Save: £3.40 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
A Rough Ride to the Futur... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by SNaylerBooks
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Orders shipped daily from the UK. All international orders sent via airmail. Professional seller. Enquiries responded to daily.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

A Rough Ride to the Future Hardcover – 3 Apr 2014

26 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£13.59
£7.26 £5.84
£13.59 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Save £20 on Amazon.co.uk with the aqua Classic card. Get an initial credit line of £250-£1,200 and build your credit rating. Representative 32.9% APR (variable). Subject to term and conditions. Learn more.

Frequently Bought Together

  • A Rough Ride to the Future
  • +
  • Gaia: A New Look at Life on Earth
  • +
  • The Vanishing Face of Gaia: A Final Warning
Total price: £30.77
Buy the selected items together



Product details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Allen Lane (3 April 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0241004764
  • ISBN-13: 978-0241004760
  • Product Dimensions: 14.6 x 2.1 x 22.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 249,264 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

James Lovelock is the author of more than 200 scientific papers and the originator of the Gaia Hypothesis (now Gaia Theory). He has written four books on the subject: Gaia: A New Look at Life on Earth, The Ages of Gaia and Gaia: The Practical Science of Planetary Medicine, as well as an autobiography, Homage to Gaia. His most recent was The Revenge of Gaia (Allen Lane, 2006). In 2003 he was made a Companion of Honour by Her Majesty the Queen, and in September 2005 Prospect magazine named him as one of the world's top 100 global public intellectuals. In April 2006 he was awarded the Edinburgh Medal at the Edinburgh International Science Festival.

Product Description

About the Author

James Lovelock, who was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1974, is the author of more than 200 scientific papers and the originator of the Gaia Hypothesis (now Gaia Theory). His many books on the subject include Gaia: A New Look at Life on Earth (1979), The Revenge of Gaia (2006), and The Vanishing Face of Gaia (2009). In 2003 he was made a Companion of Honour by Her Majesty the Queen, in 2005 Prospect magazine named him one of the world's top 100 public intellectuals, and in 2006 he received the Wollaston Medal, the highest Award of the UK Geological Society.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

54 of 57 people found the following review helpful By Brian Clegg TOP 500 REVIEWER on 3 April 2014
Format: Hardcover
James Lovelock is unique, both as a scientist and as a writer. He may be most famous for his Gaia hypothesis that the Earth acts as if it were a self-regulating living entity, but has done so much more in a 94 year life to date.

Rough Ride (not to be confused with Jon Turney’s Rough Guide to the Future) is an important book, but it is also flawed, and I wanted to get those flaws out of the way, as I’ve awarded it four stars for the significance of its content, rather than its well-written nature. It is, frankly, distinctly irritating to read – meandering, highly repetitive and rather too full of admiration for Lovelock’s achievements. But I am not giving the book a top rating as a ‘well done for being so old’ award – far from it. Instead it’s because Lovelock has some very powerful things to say about climate change. I’ve been labelled a green heretic in the past, and there is no doubt that Lovelock deserves this accolade far more, as he tears into the naivety of much green thinking and green politics.

He begins, though, by taking on the scientific establishment, pointing out the limitations of modern, peer reviewed, team-oriented science in the way that it blocks the individual and creative scientific thinker – the kind of person who has come up with most of our good scientific ideas and inventions over the centuries. He does this primarily to establish that he is worth listening to, rather than being some lone voice spouting nonsense. I’m not sure he needs to do this – I think there are few who wouldn’t respect Lovelock and give him an ear, but it’s a good point and significant that he feels it necessary.

The main thrust of the book is to suggest that our politicians (almost universally ignorant of science) are taking the wrong approach to climate change.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 15 Jun. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I can remember being captivated by Gaia when Lovelock published his original ideas. I found it fitted closely with my own academic experiences as a Geography undergrad. In later years I tried to introduce a lot of the ideas into my teaching...difficult in crappy UK geography teaching curricula at GCSE and A level. Lovelock explains why...we don't get enough good training in basic scientific method and that inevitably leaves us with difficulties when communicating the basics. This latest or (last) pop at the whole thing is excellent. Lovelock never forgets his scientific roots so all claims he makes are backed up by his training, background or experience, which makes this a very rich reading experience. These days I teach ecology based subjects and I found Lovelock's ideas and observations are absolutely perfect for bringing into wider discussions about the problems the world faces. As I said, a rich read and much of it merits re-reading, reflection and note taking so it's a beautiful compendium of earth science. As always, he has his opinions which are strong, well-argued and backed up with experience and further reading lists so this book is a good start for anyone wishing to learn. I was very entertained by his opinions of politicians and government officials. ..which is basically poorly educated and muddled...which is exactly how I have found them (and I get to see more than most). The detail here suggests optimism for the planet although a less clear outcome for human occupation. He is probably right... as I write this I see my neighbour out on his massive billiard table lawn with a machine for cutting grass, a machine for burning weeds, a machine for poisoning weeds, a load of traps to collect magpies to kill for his gun dogs, and a shed festooned with the skulls of animals he has been proud to kill. Once you have read this go and read Stephen Emmott's 'Ten Billion' and maybe you will conclude that we don't really deserve to live here in the first place!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Kristoffer Rypdal on 20 Oct. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Understanding our place in the universe, in space and time, can be an invaluable guide to how to manage our lives. James Lovelock has contributed significantly to this understanding through his exceptionally long life as a scientist and author of important books accessible for a broad readership. The present book conveys some of this insight, although the recent book by his former collaborators Tim Lenton and and Andrew Watson, "The Revolutions that Made the Earth, " is infinitely better in this respect. The main problem with Lovelock's book is that it is stuck with the Gaia metaphor as a "theory of everything" and applies the same principles to fundamentally different issues operating on vastly different time scales and raising incomparable moral dilemmas.

Lovelock (deliberately) confuses the survival of the the complex system that many of us like to think of as the Living Earth in the face of an increasingly brighter Sun, with the global warming resulting from unrestricted combustion of fossil fuels. The confusion is that the former is a problem that will gradually arise over the coming few hundred million years, while the latter is an issue that will affect us and our children and grandchildren. Lovelock's concern and compassion is not with present-day humans and our offspring, but with the prolonged future of Gaia beyond the "normal" astronomically determined future lifespan of nearly a billion years of life on Earth.

Despite Lovelock's assertion that the book is about the distant future and fate of Gaia, a considerable part of it is spent on mocking those of us who are concerned about anthropogenic warming.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback