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The Rough Guide to North African Cafe Enhanced

4 customer reviews

Price: £5.03 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
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£5.03 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Rough Guide to North African Cafe + The Rough Guide to the Music of Morocco (Second Edition)
Price For Both: £10.01

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Product details

  • Audio CD: 12 pages (31 Dec. 2008)
  • 12 pages
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Enhanced
  • Label: World Music Network
  • ASIN: 1906063095
  • Other Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 55,515 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Product Description

Product Description

Amble down the narrow walkways of a North African medina past the cafes filled with the aromatic smoke of hookah pipes and hum of local chatter all around. 'The Rough Guide To North African Cafe' is a musical journey through the bustling backwaters of Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria and Egypt, featuring artists from Algeria's legendary Maurice El Medioni to French-Tunisian oud master, Smadj. Welcome to North Africa's most intoxicating sounds.

Review

(4 stars) An incredible Mediterranean melting pot of styles...this compilation is modern, collaborative and indeniably exciting. -- Songlines, (Nathaniel Handy), September/October 2007

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By rosalind on 28 Sept. 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Very evocative of sounds of Middle East and Africa, good to hear to remind us there is a lot more to the ancient history of these areas than violence and political clashes. I listen all the time.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
It certainly does evoke an ambiance of North African Music which is why I bought it.....for a Couscous night.
If you haven't a clue about this music ...it's a good introduction.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
GOOD SELECTION, VARIETY TO HEAR NEW SOUNDS.
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By mr kevin doyle on 15 Aug. 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Good to deal eith.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Ambient Coffe House Atmosphere of the Sahara 5 Jun. 2008
By Zekeriyah - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This CD marks a new trend in the recent releases of the 'Rough Guides' series of World Music CD. Drawing upon artists from across Arabic-speaking North Africa, it provides a very cool, atmospheric sound. It's almost as if you're having a cup of coffee (qahwa) in Cairo, Marrakech, Oran or Tunis. All the names that you would expect are here, from the soulful Kabyle of Akli D to Smadj's techno-'oud remix to the Nubian beats of Abdel Gadir Salim. Theres also some new favorite's, like the Corsican/Arabic rock of Les Boukakes, the light melodic vocals of singer Akim el Sikameya, and the unique simsimiyya playing of Egypt's El Tanbura Ensemble. Andalusian influences are strong, from Cheb Balowski's Gypsy-tinged 'El Dia' to Barrio Chino's 'El Salam,' recalling Spain's centuries of Moorish rule. Perhaps more surprising is the inclusion of Sahabat Akkiraz, who's beautifully haunting voice draws upon the rich heritage of her Turkish homelands. In the end, this is a CD that calls to mind the rich, ambient moods of North Africa. Appropriately enough, it ends with the thoroughly enjoyable 'La Foule' by Tarik. Listening to this CD will call to mind all the excitement and atmosphere of the streets of Alexandria, the cafes of Oran, and the markets of Khartoum. It's an excellent CD, and easily one of my favorite releases in the 'Rough Guides' series. It also nicely complements the more recently released 'Rough Guide to Arabic Cafe,' and I suggest buying the two together. Just trust me on this, you'll get about two hours worth of magnificent Arabic music. Can't go wrong there.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
not arabic enough 31 July 2008
By George Banjo - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Though this is a good "cafe" selection, good backround music, with a lot of good music in its own right, the title is misleading. It seems to imply a traditional North African cafe, with all the traditional music you might find there. I'm sure that's not the point of this album, but as the liner notes point out, "cafe" music originally came from France. So, for this album they seem to search for all the French or European influenced "North African" music they can - or really any music at all. There's nothing wrong with that, really, but I am something of a purist. There are no traditional ensembles, little oud playing, or classical Arabic music. Barrio Chino, for example, are interesting, but they are based in France, and perform French/Spanish/Algerian music. Many of the artists are based in France or Spain - and that's fine, but it's not as if there's a lack of traditional north African performers. Most of these artists are connected to Algeria, specifically.

Only three tracks are disappointing; Les Boukakes, who play rock music with guitar solos, Makiodo, who play an electronic, quite imaginary North African song, and Akim El Sikameya, whose track is basically French jazz. That said however, there is some good music. Akli D's track, the first track, is particularely good, with strong Arabic and Berber roots. Abdel Gadir Salim's track is very soulful and distinctly Sudanese, with it's dual Arabic/African influences (if you like his music, I recomend the album Ceasefire), and El Tambura play an unusual track, with an Ancient Egyptian tradition. Mahmoud Fadl, from southern Egypt, plays a short track that brings to mind the desert sands, Orient Expressions has a Turkish track, and Les Orientales have the closest thing here to Arabic classical music.

If you just want some good music, you'll probably like this a lot, but if you're looking for traditional North African music, get the rough guides to Morocco, Arabic Cafe, Bellydance Cafe or Bellydance instead, or listen to samples of this before you get it.
Varied Tunes from Rough Guide 4 Sept. 2013
By Neodoering - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This album contains 14 songs from various Middle Eastern artists, which vary a good deal in their instrumentals and lyrics and will give you an hour of listening pleasure. I don't speak Arabic, so I can't say what the singers were going on about, but the vocals seem passionate and fired up, and there are instruments both familiar (piano) and new (oud). The album seems to lean toward modern music instead of traditional tunes, and I thought of this more as lounge music than cafe music. Most of the songs are rather short, around three minutes, which means that just as you're getting into the tune, it's over. If you like longer songs, this may not be your album.
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