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The Rough Guide to the Music of Hungarian Gypsies [CD]

Various Artists Audio CD
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: £8.84 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
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The Rough Guide to the Music of  Hungarian Gypsies + The Rough Guide To The Music Of Romanian Gypsies
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Product details

  • Audio CD (31 Dec 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: World Music Network
  • ASIN: 1906063214
  • Other Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 115,666 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

Product Description

Hungarian Gypsy (Roma) music is vibrant, passionate and brimming with colour, yet its songs reflect the hardships of daily life. From the camps and villages of rural Hungary, its popularity has swept around the world. 'The Rough Guide To The Music Of Hungarian Gypsies' explores the Gypsy revival with leading artists including Ando Drom, Kalyi Jag, Romano Drom, and Parno Graszt.

Product Description

The correct title for this album is THe Rough Guide To The Music Of Hungarian Gypsies...

Customer Reviews

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4.8 out of 5 stars
4.8 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Rich, Hot and Spicey Musical Journey 11 Aug 2004
Format:Audio CD
If you want a musical journey to the rich diversity that Hungarian roots music has to offer: this Rough Guide is your ticket! Here are 72 minutes and 49 seconds of some of the best Hungarian music that money can buy. This CD contains music from current mainland Hungary, as well as former territories, such as Slovakia, Croatia, and Transylvania (Romania). The liner notes are extremely accurate and helpful in describing the origin and individuality of the Hungarians from a musical and historical perspective. The harmonic roots of Hungarian music go as far back as Central Asia, East of the Caucaus and Ural mountains. Furthermore, the liner notes aptly describe Hungary as "the wild and colourful alter ego of Hapsburg Austria" which essentially sums up Hungary's fierce nature to be rid of the political chains and alliances that hampered her freedom in the past ...
Quite often this yearning for freedom was summed up in songs, disguised in verse, the "verbunkos" or recruiting songs at the turn of the century, contained bittersweet prose, laments by conscripted soldiers who expressed sorrow at parting from one's home, one's family, one's sweetheart (to serve the Kaiser), perhaps never to return. Sebo Ensemble play a version from northeast Hungary, which includes the sounds of boots slapping and foot-stomping, as young men are obviously doing the "verbunkos" dance ... included too is the mellow sound of the tarogato (similar to a shawm oboe) with clarinet-like sounds.
Selection #1 sung by Iren Lovasz and played by Laszlo Hortobagyi is an example of ancient music based on the pentatonic scale, a very old folksong about a peacock.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Traditional folk music from Hungary 13 May 2005
By Peter Durward Harris #1 HALL OF FAME TOP 10 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
If you are looking for an all-round compilation of Hungarian music, this isn't it. This compilation focuses exclusively on traditional music, which is fine by me (that's what I bought it for) but you must look elsewhere to find contemporary Hungarian music. Like traditional folk music everywhere, the music here is fairly simple but effective, with limited instrumentation, being originally intended for local events such as dances and weddings, or simply for passing the time. Shepherds' songs form an important part of traditional folk music. Overall, there is a fine mix of ballads and up-tempo songs. All the singers sound wonderful even though I don't understand the words.

The geographical area from which this music is selected is not limited to Hungary as we know it today. For example, Transylvania (of Dracula fame) was once a part of Hungary but is now part of Romania. Traditional music has a stronger following there than in contemporary Hungary so some Transylvanian acts have been included, where their music is appropriate. Other countries bordering Hungary, particularly Slovakia and Serbia, have significant Hungarian-speaking areas that once were part of Hungary. There are also minority groups within Hungary whose own music has become part of the Hungarian scene. These include Serbs, Croats and Gypsies. The geographical limits are further stretched by the inclusion of a German group calling themselves the Transylvanians, who comprise mainly expatriate Hungarians. Among the artists based in Hungary are some that perform traditional music influenced by other lands, and not just those nearby. So some artists aren't based in Hungary while some tracks aren't especially Hungarian, but all the music here has a strong connection to Hungary, one way or another.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic! 26 Dec 2011
By Emmay
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
I would recommend this wonderful C.D. to anyone! The rich tapestry of soulful tunes is an absolute delight and I love every single track. The songs are mainly up-tempo with plenty of fast violin, but there are also a few rather beautiful slower tracks for good measure. The second track on the C.D.'s listing, by Parno Graszt, is particularly infectious and stays in one's consciousness for days! Admittedly I do not understand Hungarian, but for some reason it just didn't seem to matter. It is probably the best world music recording I have heard for a very long time. I feel the desire to explore Hungarian Gypsy music further after listening to this C.D. Perfect music for dancing as it is so full of vibrant energy, but equally enjoyable when sitting still as it is not overbearing. Love it!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great authentic stuff. 22 Oct 2013
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
An excellent compilation and a good taster for lovers of Hungarian music. The raucous nature of much of the music is captured well.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars  5 reviews
30 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Rich, Hot & Spicey Musical Journey: Not to be Missed! 4 Nov 2002
By Erika Borsos - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
If you want a musical journey to the rich diversity that Hungarian roots music has to offer: this Rough Guide is your ticket! Here are 72 minutes and 49 seconds of some of the best Hungarian music that money can buy. This CD contains music from current mainland Hungary, as well as former territories, such as Slovakia, Croatia, and Transylvania (Romania). The liner notes are extremely accurate and helpful in describing the origin and individuality of the Hungarians from a musical and historical perspective. The harmonic roots of Hungarian music go as far back as Central Asia, East of the Caucaus and Ural mountains. Furthermore, the liner notes aptly describe Hungary as "the wild and colourful alter ego of Hapsburg Austria" which essentially sums up Hungary's fierce nature to be rid of the political chains and alliances that hampered her freedom in the past ...
Quite often this yearning for freedom was summed up in songs, disguised in verse, the "verbunkos" or recruiting songs at the turn of the century, contained bittersweet prose, laments by conscripted soldiers who expressed sorrow at parting from one's home, one's family, one's sweetheart (to serve the Kaiser), perhaps never to return. Sebo Ensemble play a version from northeast Hungary, which includes the sounds of boots slapping and foot-stomping, as young men are obviously doing the "verbunkos" dance ... included too is the mellow sound of the tarogato (similar to a shawm oboe) with clarinet-like sounds.

Selection #1 sung by Iren Lovasz and played by Laszlo Hortobagyi is an example of ancient music based on the pentatonic scale, a very old folksong about a peacock. #2 is by the ever popular and internationally known Marta Sebestyen and Muzsikas, a "hajnalos" which is a "song to the dawn", meaning the last song sung after an all-night wedding celebration, when the sun was rising. This one is from Kalotaszeg (Transylvania). #3 is a modern version of a Mezosegi song (Transylvanian tune), which contains highly original violin embellishments, with an up-to-date vocal style by Szilvana. A magnificent variety of absolutely astonishing and energetic "tanc-haz" (dance house) music is included: "Round Dances" by Bogyiszlo Orchestra, "Friss Csardas" by Traditional Band from Tura feat. & Tibor Szenasi, the compelling traditional violin embellishments and stylizations by Mihaly Halmagyi from Moldavia is accompanied by his wife on the "gardon", Okros Ensemble, a very popular group, plays a series of dance tunes from the Rabakoz region (Raba is a river in NW Hungary, runs through the city of Gyor), "Dances from Lorincreve" (Transylvania) played by Zsigmond Szekely and the finale "Rakosi Indulo" (march) is played by Tukros Zenekar, who are also accompanied by the village band of Nyirmada. It signals the end of dancing for the night.

This CD contains a very special a capella solo by Juliana Gorbe which is in the old-style pentatonic scale. An instrumental version of the same song, included in a trio of tunes, played by Bogyiszlo Orchestra follows. The famous composer and folklorist Zoltan Kodaly identified this piece as representative of the ancient scale dating back to Turkic and Central Asian times.

There is a beautifully song, "Song of Mercy" ("Konyorges") presented by the Romani group, Kalyi Jag. It is a supplication to God, in essence a leap of faith, despite the misfortunes suffered by the Gypsies. Other Romani groups on this CD are:
Kampec Dolores, who sing about a buffalow ride at night, in a highly original creative verse, while retaining the essential elements of gypsy music. Romano Drom, a recent Vlach Romani group, sing a traditional song, providing the typical vocalizations and percussion that is distinctive to these gypsies. Fekete Vonat, is the most modern gypsy group. They sing about the past, when gypsy workers were brought to Budapest in a train from the East, and lived in hostels during the week. They create a "gypsy rap" that falls into place very nicely with oral percussion that has always been part of their tradition.

Last but not least, Ghymes, from Slovakia, provides the most unexpected and my favorite music on this CD: "Dance in the Snow". It sounds completely Hungarian both in theme and tune, but is played in 7/8 Balkan rhythm, complete with violin instrumentation ... a magnificent eclectic creation, that melds the best of both traditions! Anyone who saw the movie, "The English Patient", and was fascinated by the music, should buy this CD. If you love violin music ... this CD is for you! If international folk dance is your passion: you *MUST* own this CD!
Erika Borsos (erikab93)
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Gypsies, Vamps and great Magyar music! 26 Nov 2002
By DJ Joe Sixpack - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
A wide-ranging overview of Hungarian folk and popular music. Marta Sebestyen and Muzsikas, the country's most popular musicians outside of Bela Bartok, lead off this album. Other similarly rich, melodic acoustic material follows, but there are also plenty of odd and unexpected entries, such as several Greek-sounding Mediterranean tunes and some modern techno and rock by bands like Kampec Dolores and Emil Bijarski... An interesting, challenging selection... anyone wishing to dig deeper than the surface will definitely want to check this disc out.
15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Uneven mish-mash of styles compilation. Not really necessary 19 Feb 2005
By e1x56u$*w# - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
I misunderstood the title "rough guide", thinking that this would be an introduction which would guide us through the varied styles of traditional Hungarian music throughout the various regions of the country and Transylvania. Instead what it is, is a compilation throwing together simply anything and everything produced by musicians of Hungarian origin, from traditional folk music to Rock to Rap, with all the tracks culled from a multitude of other diverse albums. Thus as an stand-alone album it doesn't really hang together and just gives one a very brief taste of many different artists' styles and work.

I regret buying this and feel that I would have been further ahead just listening to the sound clips from this album and then buying the complete albums from the artists whose songs I did like. Unfortunately no sound clips have been provided here for this album, so instead I would recommend borrowing this from someplace like a library.

Although it does introduce you to a wide range of styles and artists, while there are some tracks on here which I really loved, there are also others I can't stand and will have to annoyingly skip over every time I play this album. And the artists that I really did like only have one track each on here, so I will end up buying their whole albums anyway.

Thus this collection is actually just a wee promo sampler to whet your appetite and lead you on to other albums, and not really something you'll want to keep forever and play over and over. -- At least that's my experience. Yours may be different.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Traditional folk music from Hungary 15 Jun 2005
By Peter Durward Harris - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
If you are looking for an all-round compilation of Hungarian music, this isn't it. This compilation focuses exclusively on traditional music, which is fine by me (that's what I bought it for) but you must look elsewhere to find contemporary Hungarian music. Like traditional folk music everywhere, the music here is fairly simple but effective, with limited instrumentation, being originally intended for local events such as dances and weddings, or simply for passing the time. Shepherds' songs form an important part of traditional folk music. Overall, there is a fine mix of ballads and up-tempo songs. All the singers sound wonderful even though I don't understand the words.

The geographical area from which this music is selected is not limited to Hungary as we know it today. For example, Transylvania (of Dracula fame) was once a part of Hungary but is now part of Romania. Traditional music has a stronger following there than in contemporary Hungary so some Transylvanian acts have been included, where their music is appropriate. Other countries bordering Hungary, particularly Slovakia and Serbia, have significant Hungarian-speaking areas that once were part of Hungary. There are also minority groups within Hungary whose own music has become part of the Hungarian scene. These include Serbs, Croats and Gypsies. The geographical limits are further stretched by the inclusion of a German group calling themselves the Transylvanians, who comprise mainly expatriate Hungarians. Among the artists based in Hungary are some that perform traditional music influenced by other lands, and not just those nearby. So some artists aren't based in Hungary while some tracks aren't especially Hungarian, but all the music here has a strong connection to Hungary, one way or another.

If some of the tracks here (especially the closing instrumental track) sound like a simplified form of classical music, that shouldn't surprise you - after all, classical music has its roots in European folk music.

While the impressive liner notes are in English, they do not say anything about the lyrics of the various songs. I don't mind hearing people sing in a foreign language but there was a time when I did. If you enjoy traditional folk music in any form, you are likely to enjoy this unless you have to understand the words.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars BEST CD! 14 Dec 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I love this CD! i remembered these songs from other CD's and it was fun to hear them to a more up-beat tune. i especially loved the "hey jancsika" song. i recomend this CD to all ages!
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