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The Rough Guide to The Earth (Rough Guides Reference Titles) Paperback – 26 Apr 2007

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Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Rough Guides; 1 edition (26 April 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1843535890
  • ISBN-13: 978-1843535898
  • Product Dimensions: 13.1 x 1.5 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 134,874 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Martin Ince is a science journalist and trained geophysicist who regularly writes for New Scientist magazine and The Times Higher Education Supplement.

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Becky on 2 May 2011
Format: Paperback
After a trip to the west of Ireland, I was keen to brush up on my school memories about rocks and mountains. I'd also been wondering about different cloud types. I went off to try and educate myself in the former and ended up buying this book, which also helped in the latter.

Martin Ince covers everything from the effects of Earth's position in space to the inner composition of the Earth as well as our surface environment in its rocky, airy, liquid and icy forms.

It is not a long book (about 270 pages) but it is packed with information, some of which (for me) was half-remembered from school and some of which was completely new. Ince does not stint on the science but everything is clearly explained and there are plenty of good diagrams, tables and photographs. I also liked how he explained how we know what we know. For example, the way we know that the inner core of the Earth must be solid while the outer core must be liquid is a brilliant piece of science which measures and interprets the different types of shock waves generated by earthquakes (P and S waves).

If you've ever wondered why there is a mass of frozen water at the north pole, or where the continents were 50 million years ago (or where they will be in 50 million years' time) or what the Moho Discontinuity is or a thousand other fascinating things about our planet, then this is ideal.

There is, of course, the final, obligatory chapter on how humans are affecting the Earth but it is proportionate and deals with aspects that a reader may not have considered before.

Finally, Martin Ince writes well and easily captures your imagination. He also provides many internet links and a list of further resources for more detail on various topics.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Tony Howard on 10 Mar. 2011
Format: Paperback
No, it's not a travel guide for extraterrestrials. It's a description of Planet Earth in every context - and a very good read it is too. The first two chapters deal with our solar system and the earth's place within it. The author begins at the beginning: the Big Bang theory & goes on to briefly describe for example nucleosynthesis of helium from hydrogen in our sun and the construction of higher elements in hotter stars such as red giants. He goes on to tell us the current theory on the making of planets and compares the characteristics of earth with the other planets and some moons in our solar system. I found the descriptions of Titan & Europa fascinating. After reminding us very clearly & succinctly of the standard stuff of seasons & tides he goes on to long term climatic cycles: precession of orbit, Milankovich cycles, sunspot cycles etc. By this stage the reader understands that he is for a thorough coverage of all aspects of our earth - in as much detail as could be crammed into 270 pages.

The next five chapters deal with the more tangible aspects of the earth: the crust, tectonic plates, geology & its timescales, the mantle, the core, the oceans our atmosphere etc etc. Most `men in the street' would learn something fascinating from these chapters.

Finally he talks about `The Earth and Us', a controversial topic which I think he steers through in a balanced & thoughtful way.

The whole book is written with a light & humorous style but with intellectual & scientific rigor. Brilliant! Five stars without a doubt.
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By Paul Britton on 19 Nov. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The very best of guides to planet earth ,purchased second hand at a nominal price from Better World Books.My life is complete!
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