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Room With a View [DVD] [1986] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

4.6 out of 5 stars 138 customer reviews

5 used from £3.30

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Product details

  • Language: English, French
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Dubbed: Spanish
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Studio: BBC Warner
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (138 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0001DCYUU
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 216,839 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Having played my VHS tape of this wonderful film until my VHS player broke, and having followed other customers' advice about the previous, poor DVD editions, I am so glad that I am now able to watch a flawless version of this classic - the picture and sound quality is as crystal clear as is possible for a film produced 22 years ago, making visible the precious details of this meticulous production: the lacey costumes and beautiful sets, the authentic interiors and coiffures, and even minute facial expressions that I had missed so far.
Among the extras are interviews with Simon Callow and Daniel Day-Lewis. The most interesting extra for me was a 1970 BBC tribute to E. M. Forster, featuring footage, photographs and quotations of himself and interviews with some of his friends, critics and contemporaries, including Frank Kermode, Christopher Ishwerwood and George Steiner.
Priceless!
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
If ever, I think, a film was crying out to be given a touch and brush up it is this one! The original was very washed out and this transfer is fantastic with colours bright and rich - highly recommended.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Much has already been said about the film itself and this review is concerned solely with the Blu-ray transfer. At the time of writing, this new Blu-ray release has only been reviewed 3 times! The vast majority of the reviews relate to previous versions and some of these were, quite rightly, critical of the poor quality of earlier transfers. Despite the fact that I have always loved this film I had a degree of trepidation before placing the order. Would I be disappointed with the Blu-ray transfer? Would it meet my high expectations with the video quality in particular? Well - I'm happy to report that the standard is truly excellent. We watched the film last night on my JVC projector and the film was sharp and with fine colour restoration. It was just like watching the film in a West End cinema on its original release. I was also suitably impressed with the audio quality. If I am honest there are a number of very good standard dvd's which will look quite good on a 50 inch screen. However, the bigger projected screen will always catch out this lower definition. This was my biggest fear - will the new 'Room With a View' meet this higher test. It does and with 'room' to spare!

Obviously, the film is not reference standard like the superb Blu-ray 'Passage to India' but that had original source material of 70mm. However, the standard is very high and the engineers should be congratulated for their achievement.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The happiest of all E M's novels, the story of Lucy and George's cross class love affair is beautifully captured by Merchant Ivory in this film. A fantastic cast - with outstanding turns by the likes of Judy Dench (before we'd decided she was a British thespian 'Grand Dame'), Simon Callow, Daniel Day Lewis (Cecil in prissy perfection), Denholm Elliot (scene stealing beautifully)and Maggie Smith - is led by the inspired casting of ingenue Bonham Carter, as she was at the time, and Julian Sands as Lucy and George. Added to the wonderful cast is a beautiful score and oscar winning art direction to create that sumptuous view. The kiss in the poppy field is one of cinemas most beautiful and romantic moments and a fantastic example of how music and cinematography can be combined to create real artistic beauty.

Is this film really over 20 years old? Once banned for nudity (on UK television, I remember it showing in C4's groundbreaking 'banned' movie season), it's an example of how literary adaptations should and can be done. This is a personal favourite, however a warning - those who are not fans of Miz Bonham Carter, of Forsters novel or of Merchant Ivory would be better off steering clear, you won't enjoy this film.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I've been to Florence, too, and I can say wholeheartedly that it was completely shot on location there. I cannot imagine what city L Matheson went to, but either s/he didn't go to Florence or s/he's blind. It's fair enough that they were bored by the film, but "very little story"? I would say that most thrillers and quest fantasies could be accused of that, generally consisting of long chase sequences, or hunts for magic tokens (although I still like the better ones), but the best stories are all about character. Yes, you can do too much naval gazing (I personally love Peter Greenaway, but don't like Mike Leigh), but this film has the mix spot-on, in my opinion.

The subtext, what the story is about: A girl and a young man, going through puberty, find love and in so-doing become adults. They learn to be self-confident and steadfast in a society so repressed that it's a miracle anyone fell in love. It's about the change in social mores, from Victorian to Edwardian (or even modern) values, the friction between following social convention and finding freedom in individual expression. The film cleverly steers us through these themes, these clashes - whilst telling a very charming and simple love story. A woman slated to marry a complete bore meets a dashing young man on holiday. The holiday romance continues on her return home when he moves into the neighbourhood. But their happiness together looks like it will be dashed because the boy's father, feeling rejected by his Victorian peers, or by the class divide, decides to move away again.

EM Forster, or at least Merchant Ivory revisited these themes in the darker Howard's End, where class and social repression become so overbearing that this time it is the individual that is squashed, the social mores of the day that rule.
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