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Ron Embleton's Wulf the Briton: The Complete Adventures Hardcover – Special Edition, 10 Dec 2010


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Hardcover, Special Edition, 10 Dec 2010
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: The Book Palace; Limited edition edition (10 Dec. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1907081135
  • ISBN-13: 978-1907081132
  • Product Dimensions: 27.7 x 3.3 x 36.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 145,651 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

The workload that Embleton undertook with Wulf was formidable. In comparison to Frank Hampson, who had a studio and assistants to help meet the weekly Dan Dare deadlines, Embleton just had himself to draw, letter and paint the feature. However, Embleton was unfazed by such considerations and within a few months he was also writing the strip and steering it in a much more historically credible direction, as well as adding an extra page to the strip! Just to see one image from the original artwork proves beyond any doubt that Ron Embleton's Wulf the Briton strip was in a league of its own. When his art appeared in late 1950s a succession of truly awesome Wulf covers had eclipsed even the best output of the Hampson studio. Never had artwork of this calibre been seen in a UK comic and for comic creatives such as Frank Bellamy, Don Lawrence, Mike Noble and John Burns, Embleton had yet again raised the bar. Unbelievable that this strip has fallen out of the collective comic consciousness for so long.

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Philip Lindsay on 14 April 2011
Format: Hardcover
I cannot begin to say how wonderful this book is. If I could award it more than five stars I would.

It is huge, the art work is simply staggering, and the quality almost beyond belief. It's BIG, its packed with information - there's a very well-informed, informative and sympathetic introduction and thus just masses and masses of the most superb Ron Embleton artwork.

I first came across "Wulf" on Westminster tube station in 1957. I was about six and a half and bought a comic called Express Weekly because there were Romans on the cover. From then on our local newsagent delivered a copy every week and Wulf was my favorite strip. It was in full colour, exciting and the drawings had a realism that appealed to me. This book allows me to date that acquisition from the Westminster bookstall (it was still there well into the 1990s) to the week of 24 August 1957!

I date my interest in Romans, the Roman army and gladiators from that date. The cover was still vivid in my mind and I found it with ease in this volume.

For those unfamiliar with Wulf, he is a young, blond-haired Celtic warrior from around the time of Nero - c60AD. Embleton took over the series from other artists and writers. In the pages of this book, Wulf begins in Roman occupied Egypt, adventuring inside pyramids and confronting evil priests. Once Embleton had control of the strip, Wulf returned to ancient Britain, fighting Romans and dealing with warring celtic tribes. Ron Embleton did his research well, as for a time we have the company of such historical figures as Cartimandua, Queen of the Brigantes. Wulf fights as a gladiator.

While the stories are involving, the artwork itself is simply unbelievable in scope, design, draftsmanship and sweep. Embleton was never less than ambitious.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Pink Fluffy Bunny TOP 100 REVIEWER on 3 Aug. 2011
Format: Leather Bound
I grew up in the 1960s reading DC and Marvel comics, but I remember there were some British comics back then that stood out in quality and scope. I was too young for `Eagle', which started several years before I was born, bur I remember the start of The Trigan Empire in 'Look and Learn', which I would read in the public library every Saturday, and the comic book event of my childhood (other than DC Comics going up from 9d to 10d which destroyed my budgeting), which was the debut of Gerry Anderson's `TV21' comic. I couldn't name the artists then, but I could recognise Frank Bellamy's work, which stood out above anyone else's, even 1960s' Marvel. Allegedly, Stan Lee offered to let him draw anything he wanted if he'd work for Marvel.

In recent years there have been quality reprints of The Trigan Empire from a Dutch publisher, and Titan Books have been reprinting the Dan Dare strips from `Eagle', which has led to an appreciation of Frank Hampson's work (and the reprints have now reached the Frank Bellamy period!). Now we have a reprint of another `lost' masterpiece in Ron Embleton's `Wulf the Briton'. This ran in a rival to `Eagle', and Ron Embleton took over an ailing Wulf in 1957, and worked on it until 1960. The format was the same "widescreen" that `Eagle' and `TV21' were published in, and Embleton - a noted illustrator of historical subjects; I recognise him from Osprey publications - took full advantage of this to create another magnificent comic strip. Its closest American equivalent would be Prince Valiant, which is currently being reprinted in a `quality' format in the USA.
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By jim fitzpatrick on 20 Sept. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Wonderful book.
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