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Rome's Enemies: Germanics and Dacians No.1 (Men-at-arms): Germanics and Daciens No.1 Paperback – 25 Nov 1982


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Rome's Enemies: Germanics and Dacians No.1 (Men-at-arms): Germanics and Daciens No.1 + Rome's Enemies: No. 2 (Men-at-Arms)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 48 pages
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing, London (25 Nov. 1982)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0850454735
  • ISBN-13: 978-0850454734
  • Product Dimensions: 18.4 x 0.5 x 24.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 144,043 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Peter Wilcox has written numerous articles on Ancient civilisations, and has also authored numerous Osprey Ancient Warfare titles.

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Indo-Europeans spread into northwest Europe, where they settle among earlier populations of Neolithic farmers and Old Stone-Age hunters. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By F. Aetius on 6 July 2008
Format: Paperback
Peter Wilcox has written a number of guides for the Osprey Military series, including an excellent title on the Celtic warriors of Gaul and Britain. In this book he turns his attention to the ancient warriors of Germania and Dacia.

After giving us a chronological overview of the period, Wilcox then sets about describing the warriors of Germania, from their physical appearnace, to their arms, armour and fighting methods.
The book covers an enormous amount of history, from the first century BC to the fifth century AD, as well as large geographic area.
Everything from Dacian Cheiftains to Frankish Warriors, Anglo-Saxons and Goths are mentioned in this book. Because of its size the book can't give any real justice to the topic it describes, but then again this is meant as a basic introductory title to the subject and not an in-depth study.

Gerry Embleton provides 8 pages of colour plates. These cover the earliest Germaic warriors, to the Anglo-Saxons, to the Germanic Warriors in Roman service at the end of the Empire. Photographs of archaeological remains, line drawings and simple maps help compliment the text.

If you'd like a good introductory title to the world of the Germanic Warrior, then this book and its sister title 'Germanic Warrior AD 236-568' by Simon MacDowall (also by Osprey publishing) would be good places to start. A great, solid and basic guide to the period. Recommended!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By amazon customer on 31 Mar. 2014
Format: Paperback
The perfect gift for all history buffs is THE ROMA VICTRIX WINE BEAKERCalix Imperium, Roma Victrix Pewter wine beaker
This is a brief overview in the Romes enemies series and really elucidates material that is either difficult to find or concentrated in any other source. They are well worthwhile references. In this short volume the oft-neglected topic of Rome's enemies are covered. The color illustrations are a high point which show several hard-to-find pictures of Rome's enemies. This book concentrates on the Germans and Dacians. Recommended.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Eric le rouge on 18 Nov. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The men-at-arms series is usually 40p long thus offers only a very quick glance at the subject.

This said, quite a lot of information is packed in this opus.

(+)
- Beautiful plates. I understand this osprey is quite old and does not have the fancy 3d rendering but the quality of the detail and appearance is very high. Most of the time, I dont think the 3d renderings that appear in the more recent osprey always add or help the text.
- Very fine and interesting sketches and details on archaeological remains. I actually never found an osprey with so much details and particular attention given to the artefacts.
- Chronology
- Glossary with a recap of all the various tribes, homlands, etc.

(-)
- shortness of the book
- Not much on fighting tactics (perhaps this is covered in another osprey?)
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Anonymous on 13 Sept. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Let me make it clear that the one star rating is aimed at Osprey, not the book itself which I have not yet read. You might be wondering why I haven't.

I purchased and received this book last year, and after opening the package I immediately placed the book on the shelf without even opening it and taking a quick look at its pages. Last night out of boredom I decided to examine my modest collection of Osprey books. I grabbed the book in question which had on its cover the title "Rome's Enemies (1): Germanics and Dacians " with the illustration of Germanic and Dacian warriors. Then I opened it only to be surprised by the content inside. The whole thing, from the first page to the last, turned out to be on the topic of American colonial troops, with full colour plates showing musket-wielding infantry of the colonial era! It was basically a book about colonial troops wrapped in the cover of another book that deals with ancient Germanic warriors! Do you know what's funny? It's the fact that I didn't realise this until nearly a year has passed since the purchase. This is an insult, an affront to my intelligence. I could not have returned it had I realised this much earlier, because I live in the Middle East, and receiving a shipment from overseas is much easier and less costly than sending one over there.

Osprey has proven to be unprofessional. Let this be a warning to other potential customers.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 12 reviews
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Its an okay book 4 Dec. 2004
By Erik Muller - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Being a junior History buff, I looked into this book, interested in learning a little more about the traditional enemies (and allies) of Rome. This book wasn't too awfully dissapointing, but it wasn't all that great either, hence the 4 stars.

For one, there was a decisive lack of Dacians in this book. There was 1 Illustation for the Dacians (the cover illustration), and about a page and a half about them. Indeed, even with the Germans, there is a woefully short amount of imformation about THEM. The couple pages of historical quotes about them and their bearing in battle was interesting, but other than that, there was hardly anything of substance about these two people.

One thing though - if you are interested in Germanic and Dacians Standards, swords, axes, or shields, get this book. Half of the book, quite literally, is about the evolution of weapons and armor, their exact sizes, their shapes, etc. I did find this part helpful, since my father is in to weapons-making, especially archaic weapons. Using the diagrams in this book, we made 2 Franciscas, which came out quite nicely made.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
More Germanic than Dacian 2 April 2007
By K. Murphy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book touches on most of Rome's major barbarians, Early Germans, Suebian/Marcomannic tribes, Goths, Franks, Anglo-Saxons, and Dacians, and also provides some information on the contemporary Gauls, Sarmatians, and Huns. As a previous reviewer has noted, the Dacians, one of the most exciting peoples of Ancient Eastern Europe, only get about two pages and one plate, when they really deserve their own men-at-arms title. The plates are some of G A Embleton's better and are finely detailed. I suppose this book captures the whole point of the men-at-arms, giving a brief overview of the subject's history and appearance, and thus laying the foundation for the reader to pursue a deeper knowledge of the subject.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
BEWARE! Now Print On Demand, weak bindings 25 May 2013
By David A. Howarth - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For the book itself, 5 stars, for this particular (PoD) printing, 2 stars. Excellent, compendious semi-scholarly coverage of an interesting topic, with great illustrations. BUT, Osprey has evidently shifted the production of all of its titles to Print on Demand, and it shows. While the printing and quality of the materials seem comparable (e.g., I cannot discern much difference in the art plates, even), whatever process they use for the bindings is NOT. I have owned a handful of older Osprey Men-at-arms books for years, and they are rock solid. I've received four Print-on-Demand Osprey books in the last week, and two of the ALREADY SHOW SIGNS OF FALLING APART. Not cool, Osprey. Selecting out PoD titles in the search criteria needs to be a priority, Amazon. Some of us can tell, and at very least you owe it to us to inform...
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Good, but could have been better 14 Nov. 2013
By Doug Welch - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book could have benefited from illustrations by Angus McBride, who must have been working on something else when this was being done. Also, the inclusion of the Dacians with the Germans is a mystery (other than the Roman conquest of Dacia happened between wars against the Germanics), they could have gotten their own book owing to the abundance of evidence about them that we have on Trajan's column alone. The Germanics were pretty much the ones who did Rome in and were a recurring threat from 100 BC to 9 AD, afterward they were more of a constant threat from the 160s on until they were looting the Urbs of Rome proper. With so many tribes and tribal confederations of growing population and influence, the Dacians could have been omitted from this volume entirely and the remaining space devoted to more information about Germanics. Nevertheless, this was an early purchase of mine in books about the Enemies of Rome and really spurred my imagination, but not as much as Rome's Enemies 2: Gallic and British Celts
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
lots of great artwork,worth it for the pictures alone. 10 July 2006
By Douglas E. Libert - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
although this book is now offered in a thicker Osprey title called Barbarian Enemies of Rome,and includes 2 other Osprey titles as well,mainly British Celts and Iberian warriors,it would be worth it to have by itself if a person could get a good price on it.I liked the authors use of the word"Supertribe" in regard to the movements of conquest by the Germanic tribes. Really that's what governments are trying to do even today,create,"supertribes" strength in numbers. Sometimes people don't want to join the tribe for different reasons or are excluded,then they resort to the sword. The difference are settled when one side buys out the other or exterminate or assimilate the other. all this in one little wafer thin book,saves me the time from having to read the complete works of Cicero,not that it wouldn't be fun to.
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