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Roman Woman: Everyday Life in Hadrian's Britain Hardcover – 20 Jul 2000


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Michael O'Mara Books Ltd; 1st edition (20 July 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1854795287
  • ISBN-13: 978-1854795281
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 15.2 x 2.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 871,470 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 25 Mar 2001
Format: Hardcover
The heronie is a typical Woman who has married a retired Roman soldier, and lives in a Roman town in Britain, just outside the fort. You will enjoy reading about one year in her life, including the chores we forget, the tirals and tribulations which we as happy to miss in a modern world, as well as her family triumphs and problems which are just as valid today as they would be 1800 years ago! This book is well writen and well researched, and will be a great addition to your library. I got my copy at Vindolanda, and really felt that it was written by someone who could have lived there!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 29 Aug 2000
Format: Hardcover
An enjoyable read. The book conbines fiction with fact about everyday roman life. The story allows you to capture the atmosphere of the characters lives almost as if the characters had written the book themselves. Yet at the same time the story covers nearly every aspect of roman life that you would want to learn about in the simplest form that the book is not just a novel but an excellent learning experience. A highly recommended read!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Lepidina on 7 Nov 2007
Format: Hardcover
I can see how some people would be disappointed in this book. The author is a well known and respected historian and this book reflects her status. I loved it. Approach it as you would many of the History channel programmes and you will be rewarded with an insight into the lives of those who were the first generation to live under Roman rule. Britain has always been a multi cultural society- this book proves it!
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 Feb 2001
Format: Hardcover
This book is simply a series of museum room settings developed to include characters who provide the opportunity to inform the viewer/reader about the objects in the room or Roman life and customs in general. There is no attempt to create any tension between the old and new lives of the British tribeswoman now married to a retired Roman soldier. Possibly the most boring book I have read, and I had to force myself to finish it.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A nice book, but the title's a bit misleading. 1 Oct 2008
By Rowen G. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
A nice enough book, but the title's a bit misleading. 'Roman Woman: a Novel of Hadrian's Britain' might have come closer.

I have owned this author's book, 'Women in Roman Britain', for some time, and found it a good and useful resource. So when I spotted this title, I assumed it was more of the same: factual historical information, based on archaeological research.

Now, while all the details of everyday life in this book are backed by historical and archaeological information (so far as I am aware,) they are set forth in fictional form, as the account of daily living of a Romanized British woman living in Eboracum (York) during the time of the emperor Hadrian. Interesting stuff, to be sure, but not what I was expecting. The problems, as I see them, are two-fold.

1) Taken as history, the book is not particularly useful as a source for research. There are no sources given for the facts of daily life: the shape of a cooking pot, the construction of clothing, the religious customs of the day, etc. No footnotes.

2) Taken as a novel, the book is rather. . . flat. There is one chapter per month. Problems are brought forth, and more or less dealt with, but there is little character development, little action; not much plot, if you will. Secondary characters are introduced, but are rather stock figures. Some possible problems are hinted at, but seldom develop. For example, the protagonist is warned that going out alone is not a good idea, as there are some dubious characters in the area, but when she does go out with only a small dog for company, there is not even a hint of a dubious character on the horizon.

As a sort of diary of a household, it's rather pleasant, though not particularly memorable. It does leave a good impression of the 'feel' of the time, and might be useful reading for someone intending to participate in a living history display of later Roman Britain, or as an accompaniment to a history course. It's not the book I thought I was buying.
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