Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Roman Legionary: 58 BC - AD 69 (Warrior 71) by Cowan, Ross (2003) Paperback – 0100


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, 0100
"Please retry"
£12.27 £7.66


Product details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing (0100)
  • ASIN: B00DJFQHBY
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Mice Guy TOP 100 REVIEWER on 20 Oct 2013
This is a very good introductory volume, covering the period form Julius Caesar to the end of the `Augustan' dynasty. It looks in more detail than usual for an Osprey at all aspects of the subject, as you can see from the contents -
P04: Introduction
P05: Chronology
P07: The establishment of the Imperial Legions; Organization, Size and Command of the Legion
.The legion; Centuries and centurions; Senior officers; The century as the primary tactical unit.
P09: Enlistment
P11: Training
P12: Length of Service
P13: Pay; Leadership and Morale
P16: Belief and Belonging
.Unit identity; Group identity
P19: Sacramentum, Decorations and Punishments
.The military oath; Rewards and decorations; Punishments; Bravado and initiative.
P23: Dress and Appearance
P25: Equipment
.Pilum; Shield; Sword; Dagger; Armour; Helmet; The burden of equipment.
[P33-40: Colour Plates]
P44: Daily Life on Campaign
.Building camp; Meals and entertainment; Camp followers; Striking camp
P46: Battle
.Formations and depth of lines; Non-continuous battle lines; Centurions, standard-bearers and optiones in battle; Centurions and standard-bearers; Optiones; The importance of experience in battle; The war cry; The charge and collision; Lulls during battle; After the battle.
P58: Websites; Glossary
P59: Bibliography
P60: Colour Plate Commentary
P64: Index

The section on `The century as the primary tactical unit' and `Formations and depth of lines' are particularly interesting, and are more informative on the subject than the two Osprey volumes on Roman Battle Tactics.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Mice Guy TOP 100 REVIEWER on 20 Oct 2013
This is a very good introductory volume, covering the period form Julius Caesar to the end of the `Augustan' dynasty. It looks in more detail than usual for an Osprey at all aspects of the subject, as you can see from the contents -
P04: Introduction
P05: Chronology
P07: The establishment of the Imperial Legions; Organization, Size and Command of the Legion
.The legion; Centuries and centurions; Senior officers; The century as the primary tactical unit.
P09: Enlistment
P11: Training
P12: Length of Service
P13: Pay; Leadership and Morale
P16: Belief and Belonging
.Unit identity; Group identity
P19: Sacramentum, Decorations and Punishments
.The military oath; Rewards and decorations; Punishments; Bravado and initiative.
P23: Dress and Appearance
P25: Equipment
.Pilum; Shield; Sword; Dagger; Armour; Helmet; The burden of equipment.
[P33-40: Colour Plates]
P44: Daily Life on Campaign
.Building camp; Meals and entertainment; Camp followers; Striking camp
P46: Battle
.Formations and depth of lines; Non-continuous battle lines; Centurions, standard-bearers and optiones in battle; Centurions and standard-bearers; Optiones; The importance of experience in battle; The war cry; The charge and collision; Lulls during battle; After the battle.
P58: Websites; Glossary
P59: Bibliography
P60: Colour Plate Commentary
P64: Index

The section on `The century as the primary tactical unit' and `Formations and depth of lines' are particularly interesting, and are more informative on the subject than the two Osprey volumes on Roman Battle Tactics.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Look for similar items by category


Feedback