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Rogue Trooper Paperback – 25 Sep 2014

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Product details

  • Paperback: 104 pages
  • Publisher: IDW Publishing (25 Sept. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1631400452
  • ISBN-13: 978-1631400452
  • Product Dimensions: 25.7 x 16.8 x 0.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 586,242 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Brian Ruckley lives in Edinburgh. He has worked for a series of organisations dealing with environmental and youth development issues, but now writes full-time.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sam Quixote TOP 500 REVIEWER on 26 Sept. 2014
Format: Paperback
Back when I was a teenager and read nothing but 2000AD (in between Terry Pratchett and Douglas Adams novels), Rogue Trooper was a character I couldn’t care less about. He had this iconic, cool look with his striking blue skin but he didn’t seem like a particularly complex or interesting character with a discernible goal – he just ran around a dull, rocky planet, killing stuff while his gun, helmet, and backpack talked to him (which I admit was a nifty detail).

Well, it’s now many years later and I’ve finally read a complete Rogue Trooper arc, and I’m surprised that my initial impression of the character was spot on!

Nu-Earth is a planet so ravaged by war, it’s atmosphere has become toxic. Enter the Genetic Infantry, troops engineered to survive and fight under its hostile conditions. Blue (what a racist nickname!) is the last survivor in his group but his comrades live on in the biochips he’s attached to his helmet, gun and backpack. After deserting and pursuing his own objectives, Blue is labelled the Rogue Trooper, on a seemingly endless mission in this vague and terrible war.

Brian Ruckley takes the right tack in this book - Rogue Trooper is essentially an ‘80s action movie with big, brainless violence and a ripped guy without a shirt firing a huge gun, and that’s how Ruckley writes it. There are no lofty themes decrying the horrors of war or complex characters - it’s pretty much shallow killing from start to finish, and that’s fine.

That said it’s not totally without soul. I love how the biochips, Gunnar, Bagman and Helm have these concerned talks about Rogue’s mental state out his earshot, like they’re looking out for their buddy even in death.
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By Ian B. on 2 July 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A grate story and art work it took me back to when I was a kid
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By S. C. Roberts on 8 Nov. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
superb book, fast delivery,highly reccomended
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By Stewart M. Forrester on 12 April 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
great, love it
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Intriguing reboot of a classic series (4.5 stars) 20 Sept. 2014
By Alt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This paperback collects IDW's 4 issue reboot of the classic Rogue Trooper series that first appeared in 2000AD. A genetic soldier named Blue (presumably for his skin color) is a deserter, the titular rogue trooper. He carries a giant mechanical cockroach that doubles as a backpack. The backpack is chatty, but Blue also converses with his gun and with his helmet. All are chips that were once in bodies like his own.

Blue has become something of a legend on Nu Earth, a mineral-rich but toxic planet that is deadly to humans who aren't wearing chemsuits. The toxicity is a product of an ongoing war. The deadly environment doesn't bother Genetic Infantrymen like Blue, who were created to battle the Norts. As this story begins, Blue is fighting both the Norts and his own military police, who have been ordered to terminate him. Blue has a supporter in the military who opposes the order to shoot him on sight, but her superiors don't want a rogue trooper encouraging other defections, much less becoming a folk hero.

Blue is the only survivor of the Quartz Zone, unless you count the chips that are now in his custody (and hopeful of eventually acquiring new bodies). The story follows Blue as he tries to determine responsibility for the betrayal that resulted in the Quartz Zone massacre. Nonstop action characterizes the story (it's a good thing Blue has been created with robust healing mechanisms, given the number of times he gets shot) but Rogue Trooper is more intelligent than much of the action-oriented military sf I've encountered. Characterizations are strong and the plot development is intriguing.

The art captures the eerie setting in which the story takes place. It is unfortunate that the series was killed after 4 issues. I hope IDW revives it at some point. If I could, I would give this rendition of Rogue Trooper 4 1/2 stars.
Like a good Sci-Fi B-movie, and a good reboot of a classic 2 Oct. 2014
By W. McCoy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
'Rogue Trooper:Last Man Standing' is based on an older 2000AD character. He's actually a pretty cool character and I'd like to read more about him.

Stuck on a lifeless planet with a talking gun, helmet and backpack, he is a relentless and unstoppable soldier. When he rescues a soldier on the battlefield, he chooses to save him. When troops are deployed to destroy him, he has to make other choices. The talking equipment provides some comic relief which is needed since Rogue is so stoic.

Art by Alberto Ponticelli is pretty great. I love Rogue's blue skin and the starkness of the planet. Sometimes the dialogue was a bit hard to read from the talking equipment, but that could have been because it was a review copy. I liked this standalone story.

I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Diamond Book Distributors, IDW Publishing and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Brainless but decent comic 26 Sept. 2014
By Sam Quixote - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Back when I was a teenager and read nothing but 2000AD (in between Terry Pratchett and Douglas Adams novels), Rogue Trooper was a character I couldn’t care less about. He had this iconic, cool look with his striking blue skin but he didn’t seem like a particularly complex or interesting character with a discernible goal – he just ran around a dull, rocky planet, killing stuff while his gun, helmet, and backpack talked to him (which I admit was a nifty detail).

Well, it’s now many years later and I’ve finally read a complete Rogue Trooper arc, and I’m surprised that my initial impression of the character was spot on!

Nu-Earth is a planet so ravaged by war, it’s atmosphere has become toxic. Enter the Genetic Infantry, troops engineered to survive and fight under its hostile conditions. Blue (what a racist nickname!) is the last survivor in his group but his comrades live on in the biochips he’s attached to his helmet, gun and backpack. After deserting and pursuing his own objectives, Blue is labelled the Rogue Trooper, on a seemingly endless mission in this vague and terrible war.

Brian Ruckley takes the right tack in this book - Rogue Trooper is essentially an ‘80s action movie with big, brainless violence and a ripped guy without a shirt firing a huge gun, and that’s how Ruckley writes it. There are no lofty themes decrying the horrors of war or complex characters - it’s pretty much shallow killing from start to finish, and that’s fine.

That said it’s not totally without soul. I love how the biochips, Gunnar, Bagman and Helm have these concerned talks about Rogue’s mental state out his earshot, like they’re looking out for their buddy even in death. There is a poignant sadness in how Rogue seems to carry the weight of his friends’ deaths as if he’s responsible which is maybe why he’s so withdrawn a character compared to the strangely lively and chatty biochips.

Alberto Ponticelli’s art isn’t on the same level as Glenn Fabry’s cover art but it’s still good. He’s not given much to work with given that Nu-Earth is mostly a barren wasteland with muted colours but Ponticelli’s work is never boring to look at. Also when Rogue goes after the soldiers out to bring him in, the battle is nicely choreographed in an easy-to-follow way.

Rogue Trooper’s not the most amazing comic you’ll read but it’s entertaining enough and it’s enjoyable seeing Rogue gunning down such two-dimensional baddies. Normally I’d critique that kind of thing but I feel it’s appropriate here as I think that’s how the character’s always been so Ruckley’s just being true to the spirit of the title.

In the mood for a comic you don’t need to think about to enjoy? Rogue Trooper’s your man and this book is a great introduction to him.
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