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Rocketship X-M [DVD] [1950]


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Product details

  • Actors: Lloyd Bridges, Osa Massen, John Emery, Noah Beery Jr., Hugh O'Brian
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 18
  • Studio: Cornerstone
  • DVD Release Date: 16 Nov 2009
  • Run Time: 77 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005IBKV
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 80,258 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Colonel Floyd Graham (Lloyd Bridges) heads a rocketship mission to the moon which blasts-off from Earth only to accidentally land on Mars instead. The intrepid astronauts, true to their intrepid nature, decide to explore anyway and are shocked to discover that the Red Planet once had a civilisation which was almost completely destroyed in an atomic holocaust, leaving the survivors to regress to the level of primitives. Urk! Watch out! Danger lurks in every crater!

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 31 Jan 2004
Format: DVD
Rocketship X-M was really one of the first good science fiction films of the 1950s, and its influence can be seen in the slew of space movies released throughout that decade. In some ways, it is the quintessential science fiction film of the era; it sends a crew of four men and one woman into space for the first time, and these characters actually get a chance to express their own personalities during the journey. While the science of the film misses the mark in a number of ways, the filmmakers did not rely on alien "monsters" to help the story along. The movie has a message, and its plausibility and rather unhappy conclusion bring that message home to viewers. The film also reflects to some degree the culture of the time in terms of gender, sporting a number of chauvinistic lines sure to rankle many modern viewers.
Our intrepid crew for this secret first manned spaceship launch consists of ship designer Dr. Exum (John Emery), navigator Floyd Graham (Lloyd Bridges), engineer Major William Corrigan (Noah "Rockford's Dad" Beery, Jr.), some less important guy played by Hugh O'Brian, and brilliant female chemist Dr. Lisa Van Horn (Osa Massen). When Floyd isn't navigating, he's putting the moves on the cold and aloof Lisa. Things go swimmingly at first (with the ship, not with Lloyd's advances), but then a problem with the fuel mixture (sure – blame the woman) causes the engines to die. When Dr. Van Horn defends her computations, she is treated to a few chauvinistic remarks about acting like a woman; the great and mighty men figure things out on their own, and before you know it everyone is knocked unconscious and the Rocketship X-M (which was supposed to land on the moon) finds itself flung out into deep space.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Dean Bolderson on 15 Sep 2001
Format: DVD
For over fifteen years i had always believed that George Pal's sc-fi epic Destination Moon made in colour in 1950 was the first serious space movie,but i was to be proved wrong. Actually filmed in B&W in 1949 by the Lippert Studios and released in 1950 (thus pipping Destination Moon to the post) Rocketship X-M was to be the first of the serious space adventures. Having never seen this film before on tv i assumed that it was low grade B-movie entertainment similar to Queen of Outer Space
or Robot Monster and not worthy of being shown to the masses, but i was pleasantly surprised. This film ranks amongst the best of the 50's sci-fi classics and certainly started the genre, ok so it may lack special effects (shots of the ship in space flight would have helped) but once they reach mars the effects increase to produce a wonderful pinkish view of the surrounding terrain (which was actually filmed in california's Death Valley in sepia color). Good stiff upper lip performances from it's stars (look out for a young hugh o'brien)an eerie music score from Ferde Graffe and a good storyline make this one a science-fiction classic and a must have for every serious sci-fi movie collector.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By P. barton on 13 Sep 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
now this is a classic, its a really good cross over to dvd, picture quality is excellent and ths sound is just as good, i love these early naive sci fi films and have always had them close to heart, man (and woman) zooming off into interplanetary space with minimal idea of what is out there, taking sandwiches and coffee and wearing iffy clothes, when you think that this is 20 years before the moon landings i think they did well and some parts are very accurate, but as with all films of this era its shows how little we actually knew about the moon and space travel in general, when you think that the trip to mars would take a year or so even with our technology, so doing it in rocket ship XM would have been...........................well what is sci fi if we don`t have any immagination, a great flim and good value for money if 50s sci fi is your thing
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Eternal Moments on 28 April 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is the very first of the genera and even though it was cheaply made it is still very fascinating to watch. The technology is very simple and perhaps the plot becomes a bit unbelievable, nonethless it is excellect because all the actors seem like real people and the ending is very unusual indeed and very sad. I am looking forward to the new DVD version which is coming in a few years. Hopefully it will be a cleaner looking copy of a true classic.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By mike on 20 Nov 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Great flim interesting to see how space travel was veiwed at that time, and although there were set backs ,they were determined to carry on into the final frountier.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By The Movie Guy on 8 Feb 2014
Format: DVD
I viewed the 2000 restored DVD which was done very well. The film was interesting from a cultural and lack of science point of view as compared to today. The tittle of the film stands for Rocketship Expedition Moon, but REM would cause confusion decades later when the band by the same initials would show up on the scene, so good foresight on that one, but alas it stops here.

During the trip while meteors were missing the ship, Lloyd Bridges was hitting on Osa Massen. In that day and age the reporter asked, "Why have a woman on the trip?" instead of "Why Not a woman in space?" And yes meteors made whooshing sounds in space.

The gauges all say "General Electric" and the earth actually does have longitude lines, something I thought man simply conceived. There was no "Tang" on the mission, but they did serve sandwiches and zero gravity only affects flight jackets, not people.

The navigator is an astronomer, because God knows without a professional astronomer to direct the rocketship to the moon, they might go off to some other planet like Mars...which they did and without a prime directive. Here they missed out on Rock Creatures, Insect society, and Hungarian accent leaders so they can make a South Park statement about nuclear war, something like "Nuclear War is bad. Okay."

And during the film, they "go around" the earth, travel "parallel" to it, but never do they use the word "orbit."
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