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Rock Island Line
 
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Rock Island Line

1 Aug. 2013 | Format: MP3

£0.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:28
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Aug. 2013
  • Release Date: 1 Aug. 2013
  • Label: Black Sheep Music
  • Copyright: (c) 2013 Entertain Me Europe LTD
  • Total Length: 3:28
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00EHHPMHS
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 79,908 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Charlie-CJ HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 9 Jun. 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
My daughter sang 'My old mans a dustman' in the primary school choir and asked for the record (well CD). I bought her this anthology as it seemed incredible value for three CDs (and it is). My daughter (now 14) fell in love with the music and it's been on her CD or MP3 player ever since - she now even rates Lonnie as her favourite pop singer. As a child I loved 'John Henry', 'Rock Island Line', 'Cumberland gap' and 'Does your chewing gum lose it's flavour', and the humorous way many of the tracks are recorded. Although being born in the East End in the late 1950s, I missed nearly all of the rest of these tracks first time around though (at 18 I was into Deep Purple, Hawkwind, The Strawbs and Genesis) - although my mother & father taught me the words 'Skiffle' and 'Washing board' at an early age.

The musical variety of tracks on offer here, all delivered in LD's enthusiastic style, is quite impressive, ranging from his early classics to pretty good cover versions of contemporary songs, e.g. The parties over - although most of his 50s hits were covers as well, and none the worse for that. His use of simple 'instruments' like tea chests, tins, washing boards and a cheap Spanish guitar gave the impression that anyone could do it, and he kicked off the teenage garage bands of the 50s and 60s. He became unfashionable in the 1970s (although he wrote 'I'll never fall in love again' for Tom Jones). However his influence on the pop stars from the 60s onwards meant that he was always well respected in the industry, leading to tribute concerts and recordings later in life. In 2002 he died at 71 while still touring. It could be said his music, combined with the Buddy Holly sound, led to the Beatles and British domination of popular music in the 1960s and 1970s.
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40 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Peter Reeve VINE VOICE on 7 May 2006
Format: Audio CD
This is an extraordinary collection, showing the full range of Lonnie's work. The insert notes unfold into a poster with notes on every track, which is an excellent idea. Lonnie's influence on the British music scene is hard to overestimate. He inspired the generation that produced the Beatles, The Rolling Stones, et al. After Lonnie, every young man wanted to be in a group. I was 7 years old when Rock Island Line was released, and I was immediately recruited into my brother's skiffle group, where I banged an upturned cookie tin and scraped a washboard. Throughout Britain, thousands of kids were doing the same. It was a cultural phenomenon that would later blossom into the British Invasion. According to Paul McCartney, Lonnie 'was the man'.

What happened was this: Various American folk music traditions - New Orleans jazz, Bluegrass, Blues, Gospel - made their way to Europe in the decades preceding and following World War II. Traditional jazz became extremely popular in Britain. Chris Barber's Jazz Band was perhaps the best. If you are a jazz fan and have not heard them, you should. They are spectacularly good. Lonnie was a member of the band, playing banjo and guitar. He became aware of another tradition, called skiffle. This had originated as 'rent party' music in the southern US, and comprised jazzed-up versions of folk and blues played on improvised instruments. Lonnie played skiffle during intervals at Barber concerts, and found an audience.

After the chart success, on both sides of the Atlantic, of his first single, Rock Island Line, Lonnie and his group gradually separated (on good terms) from the Barber band.
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67 of 70 people found the following review helpful By Boo on 21 Nov. 2002
Format: Audio CD
My Dad was in skiffle groups when he was younger so I was brought up on a diet of LD's music amongst others and constantly had to hear, "you like Lonnie who....?" when I was young. Not withstanding you either like it or hate it and he was (still is) the King Of Skiffle if you like it this is for you.
I was lucky enough to see him live a few years ago and this collection does him justice well and truly it has everything - buy this now and you won't be disappointed I promise!!!!
I have listened to this at length and it has rejuvinated my dad, heaven help us if he finds a washboard!!!!!!!!!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jess Ratcliff on 11 Aug. 2010
Format: Audio CD
"He was the first person we had heard of from Britain to get to the coveted No. 1 in the charts, and we studied his records avidly. We all bought guitars to be in a skiffle group. He was the man." Paul McCartney

"I wanted to be Elvis Presley when I grew up, I knew that. But the man who really made me feel like I could actually go out and do it was a chap by the name of Lonnie Donegan." Roger Daltrey

In retrospect, Skiffle can appear slightly strange in the history of post war popular music. Instruments made from household utentsils? Amercian Folk, Blues and Spirituals sung by Londoner's? Although effectively killed off as a movement with the advent of Beat music in the early 60's, (which itself was more or less defunct by '66 as Pop became more sophisticated and Rock debuted), Skiffle was the bridge for young men who looked across the ocean to the highly sexualized and exotic sounds of the first Rock n' Roller's with awe and wonder. As Roger Daltrey acknowledges in the quotation above, EVERYONE wanted to be like Elvis but it was homegrown British artists who showed how it could be done, (Hank Marvin of 'The Shadows' had the same impact on budding guitarists), and many 60's artists (such as the Beatles) started off in Skiffle groups.

Lonnie Donegan was the pre-eminent Skiffle artist, who, as these singles show, did not simply copy and regurgitate songs from the American tradition, but also reinterpreted them (just as 'The Beatles', 'Stones' and other British acts would do in the 60's). Listening to this collection, the artist that Lonnie Donegan most reminds me of is Pete Seeger, who sung the same kind of material.
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