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Robotics: Designing the Mechanisms for Automated Machinery Audio Cassette – Audiobook, 28 May 1999


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Product Description

About the Author

Ben Zion Sandler has more than thirty years of experience in the machine design field as a practicing engineer, inventor, writer and teacher. He is currently Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Ben Gurion University of the Negev in Beersheva, Israel, where he has held the Hy Greenhill "Creative Machine and Design" Chair. For ten years Professor Sandler was in charge of the university's Research and Development Engineering Institute and Design Office. Prior to entering full-time teaching and research, he worked as a design engineer and engineering team manager in both the Soviet Union and the United States. Professor Sandler has been awarded twenty patents for his work in machine design. He has published forty-seven articles as well as four books.

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First Sentence
The word "robot" is of Slavic origin; for instance, in Russian, the word paboTa (rabota) means labor or work. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
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Amazon.com: 4 reviews
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Real robotics for real engineers. 24 July 2001
By Joseph Chiu - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio Cassette Verified Purchase
This is what real robots are all about -- machines that labor away, doing work without our help, not souped up remote control cars with saw blades and flipper arms (amusing as they might be).
You've seen them on T.V. -- giant arms that weld cars together, pistons and arms that stack and organize a bundle of newspapers, the vibrating tumbler where all the exiting parts are facing the same way, and a conveyor belt arrayed with perfect tablets (because the broken ones have been rejected out).
Learn:
...Systematic planning of robotic automation
...Different driving mechanism (motors, hydraulics, ...)
...Kinematics of machines (actuators, cams, vibrations)
...Transportation systems (conveyors, rotating table, vibration beds)
...Feeding and orientation (arrange all parts the same way, pull parts from bins and magazines, reject off-spec pieces)
...Mechanisms (automatic assembly, inspection, grippers, guides, even walking robots)
This book clearly explains the mechanics behind these robots, from general theories of operation (suitable for beginners) to the intimate formulas that optimize the mechanisms (great reference for practicing machine makers).
This is not a hobbyist "how-to" cook book, so don't expect plans or instructions on how to build such machines. To put the information to good use, you need to have good machining (metal work) skills. Still, it's a great book even if you're just curious about the topic.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Cool stuff - well written 6 Nov 2002
By Eddie Stone - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio Cassette
Includes tons of drawings of robotics components. It contains illustrated passages about nearly every mechanical component out there. The drawings are clear and simple. Each has a well-written description. An interesting book for anyone mechanically inclined. For engineers it has tables and equations to lay out some of the mechanisms. It also It is an excellent idea jogger and a fun read if you like mechanical stuff. A great book!
Execute your math with great practicality 14 Sep 2009
By dagineer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio Cassette Verified Purchase
This is a terrific book for the practicing engineer to use, but you'd better have your mathematics greased and ready. It is written to take one through the process of design for specific robotic functional areas. Even if you are rusty, the pattern is there to illuminate what you need to brush up on.
I only wish I had the time on the job to carry out the synthesis and analysis as laid out in this book.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
not a hobbyist book 15 Oct 2012
By John Smallberries - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I was surprised at the mismatch between how this book is advertised, and what it really is. It's a textbook on designing machines for very specific mass-production purposes, with a few robotics-related topics bolted on for the sexy (just like the word "Robotics" is bolted onto the title).

And by bolted on, I mean only Section 1.1, and the final section of the final chapter have anything to do with what you were likely seeking from a book on robotic mechanism design. Everything in between is concerned with highly specific industrial machines for mass production of particular items. Chapter 2 begins by discussing a machine that bends chain links from wire (though not at a lets-build-it level of detail), and suggests in exercises that you explain concepts behind a machine for filling matchboxes or playing records. The writing is at a high level with sporadic low-level mathematical detail and no nuts-and-bolts detail. It is not a book about getting something built. If you're a hobbyist looking for guidance on making autonomous or multi-purpose machines, you'll be very disappointed.
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