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Robin Hood (Children's Classics) Paperback – 5 Jan 1994


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Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Wordsworth Editions; New edition edition (5 Jan. 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1853261270
  • ISBN-13: 978-1853261275
  • Product Dimensions: 19.7 x 12.7 x 1.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 149,951 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By VENTURINI VIVIANA on 5 Jun. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Having studied English and German, I've found this book a real pleasure to read. For example, the phrase "Thou knowest" stands for "you know." It's also full of humour, e.g. "thy (your) heads, though thick, will not be thick enough to withstand his hoof (my horse's)."
I strongly recommend it, together with Ivanhoe, both edited by Wordsworth.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Barty Literati on 23 May 2011
Format: Paperback
A REVIEW OF `ROBIN HOOD' BY HENRY GILBERT

I respectfully ask readers to ignore any other reviews of Henry Gilbert's `Robin Hood' which dismiss it for its failure to capture the interest and imagination of very young children. Let me be frank. Although the legend of Robin Hood is one that has fascinated young and old alike for centuries, Gilbert's telling is not really suitable for youngsters owing to its length, depth and use of language.

And so, having stated what this particular version of `Robin Hood' is NOT, let's state what it IS. In his telling of an English legend, Gilbert has produced a compelling, exciting and worthy novel. First published in 1912, `Robin Hood' surely deserves to be regarded as a very important book, it being the first significant twentieth century account of the immortal outlaw's adventures. The 1900s would embrace Robin Hood like no other. Thanks to the new mediums of cinema and television, he of the Lincoln green clothes would be brought to life in endless new interpretations ranging from Disney's cuddly fox to mullet-cropped Kevin Costner in the 1990s. It is a love-affair that continues into the new century with fresh versions being presented in the form of a popular BBC1 family adventure series and Russell Crow's more brutal cinematic outing. That all of these retellings of Robin Hood's legend owe a debt to Henry Gilbert is surely beyond question.

What makes `Robin Hood' such a good read is the sense of time and place that it consistently generates. Chapters typically open with lush descriptions of greenwood forest throughout the seasons. There is also a strong backbone of historical fact, with genuine figures and events from the past being intertwined with Robin's antics.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By F. Marsh on 29 Dec. 2010
Format: Paperback
Lots of small text. Originally purchased for my class but felt it looked too difficult for the kids to read so didn't end up using it.
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3 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Kelly A19 on 4 Nov. 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is written in very old language which is pretty unintelligible to a 21st century eight year old. An older child might not struggle with 'thee' and 'thou' but then an older child wouldn't read Robin Hood anyway! I wish I hadn't wasted my money - have found a much better version on here by John Burrows.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Virile, wholesome and subtle 12 May 2001
By E. F. Isaacs - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A literate Englishman -- or an American with an Englishman's command of the mother tongue -- wove this vivid, detailed, but never static tale, bringing to convincing and thrilling life the era of Saxon and Norman and the spreading greenwood. With great success he combined historical acccuracy of setting and the exciting and manly legends of Robin's band. The book seems to date from the first quarter, perhaps the first tenth, of the 20th century. It is not so rococo as Pyle's Robin Hood. Amazon's page labels it suitable for "ages 9-12", forsooth; it was clearly written, to my mind, for an adult reader or intelligent adolescent. The author uses obsolete words --I mean very obsolete, Chaucerian ones -- regularly but judiciously, for color and piquancy. I am reading it aloud successfuly to my 11-year-old son; my bright 14-year old is daunted by the old words, and perhaps its manly theme, for she is a maiden. We are nearly through, and highly gratified by our time spent with Mr. Gilbert's book
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Good old Robin 2 Dec. 2005
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
When I began reading this book I found the use of the older English way of speaking to be a little over-done. The first few chapters were hard to get through but the further I got the more the book grew on me. It's not my favorite Robin Hood book, but I'm glad I gave it a chance and stuck with it. I recommend this book to anyone interested in Robin Hood literature.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A pleasure for language lovers 6 Jun. 2011
By VENTURINI VIVIANA - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Having studied English and German, I've found this book a real pleasure to read. For example, the phrase "Thou knowest" stands for "you know." It's also full of humour, e.g. "thy (your) heads, though thick, will not be thick enough to withstand his hoof (my horse's)."
I strongly recommend it, together with Ivanhoe, both edited by Wordsworth.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
From 1912 a Robin Hood for the serious kid 5 July 2013
By Antonius Tio - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Any second or third grade student who insisted on reading Harry Potter "by myself" could handle this book. It has antique period terms and colorful writing which might bother others. The first publication was 1912 when children had no exposure to television.
Growing up I had five ways to experience Robin Hood; Gilbert was first and best.
At first I did not realize how different this Robin Hood was. I just liked it and wore it out. I read Howard Pyle less. The Gilberton comic and the Dell comic of the Richard Todd movie were replaced by Richard Greene in the Robin Hood television series. Henry Gilbert was fondly revisited every so often, however.
Gilbert was a literate Englishman. His granddaughter was the poet Molly Holden.
He is most famous for Robin Hood and the King Arthur book. Both targeted the child who was not afraid to read a good, tough book.
Although placed firmly in the realm of Richard the Lion-Heart, the nasty people were clearly Normans with French names. In addition to the familiar canon of names in all stories Gilbert added small people who lived in barrows. Hob o' the Hill and Ket the Trow had been aided by Robin Hood and appear several times in the story. [The edition illustrated by Brundage shows Ket the Trow on its cover.]
The resoundingly evil characters we expect were supplemented by greedy, cruel Normans who lived in a castle called Evil Hold by the people around them. One of the fine adventures not in other Robin Hood stories is the battle against the Evil Hold. One wants to think Tolkein read the first edition, but he would have been twenty then, probably reading more serious stuff.
Gilbert's work stressed moral behavior and right. His King Arthur glossed over some of the more adult parts of Morte D'Arthur. A moral aspect of Robin Hood which does not appear as part of the ordinary canon is Robin's defense of Jews when riots were inspired so money lender's records could be burned.
Expect Maid Marian, the outlawry, shooting match, being dunked by John Little and Tuck, evil deeds by the sheriff, and all those favorites. This book has all of them and more.
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