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Two for the Road

Carmen McRae, George Shearing, Carmen Mcrae & George Shearing Audio CD
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: 7.78 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
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Product details

  • Audio CD (12 July 2010)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Concord Midline
  • ASIN: B0000006D4
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 192,481 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. I Don't Stand A Ghost Of A Chance With You (Album Version)Carmen McRae 3:420.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. You're All I Need (Album Version)Carmen McRae 3:160.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Gentleman Friend (Album Version)Carmen McRae 4:110.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. More Than You Know (Album Version)Carmen McRae 4:350.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Cloudy Morning (Album Version)Carmen McRae 2:560.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Too Late Now (Album Version)Carmen McRae 5:040.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. If I Should Lose You (Album Version)Carmen McRae 2:170.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Ghost Of Yesterday (Album Version)Carmen McRae 4:530.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. What Is There To Say? (Album Version)Carmen McRae 4:470.79  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Two For the Road (Album Version)Carmen McRae 3:300.79  Buy MP3 


Product Description

Product Description

The only recorded meeting between George Shearing and Carmen McRae took place in 1980 for Concord, and it's a shame there wasn't a follow-up date. Although the pianist's backing of singers on recordings is relatively infrequent, he always provides them with richly textured and inspired accompaniment. McRae is in great voice on this date, bringing out the best in songs with her emotional and dramatic interpretations. Most of the works on this CD are gems from the Great American Songbook, including a jaunty take of "Gentleman Friend", and the moving ballad "If I Should Lose You." This top notch duo date should be of great interest to fans of either Shearing or McRae.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sheer magic. 25 Nov 2005
By Mary Whipple HALL OF FAME TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
As one who is accustomed to hearing Carmen McRae, a huge favorite, accompanied by a sax or other instruments of low timbre, I was unprepared for the magic which occurs here in this 1980 album, where she records with George Shearing for the first time. Shearing's light touch on piano, especially in the high range, contrasts dramatically with her deep, dark voice, but both artists share the same feeling for words and music, and both can build on the moods and interpretations of the other. Since they apparently never rehearsed a single note of this album, recording direct the first time they worked each song, their synchronicity is especially remarkable.

Experts on the slow, moody jazz ballad, McRae and Shearing play off each other from the first song, "I Don't Stand a Ghost of a Chance," in which the clear, high notes of Shearing's "tinkly" accompaniment set McRae's low range into sharp relief. In the emotional "More Than You Know," Shearing's piano lends a sweetness and even femininity to her dramatic but very quiet treatment of the lyrics. "Gentleman Friend," a toe-tapping, less familiar, and upbeat song (the only one on the CD) features Shearing's jazz variations, McRae's vocal variations, and the two of them coordinating naturally for her scat and his improvisations in the spontaneous conclusion.

Among the exciting (and sometimes unfamiliar) songs here, two stand out for me. "Cloudy Morning" became an instant favorite, with Shearing creating a romantic, moody impression with sounds of thunder in the piano bass. His singing voice is much darker and deeper than McRae's, of course, and when she answers his lyrics, she does so with an uncharacteristic delicacy which makes the harmony of their duet a "chicken skin moment.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sheer magic. 6 Nov 2005
By Mary Whipple HALL OF FAME TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
Far more accustomed to hearing Carmen McRae, a huge favorite, accompanied by a sax or other instruments of low timbre, I was unprepared for the magic which occurs here in this 1980 album, where she records with George Shearing for the first time. Shearing's light touch on piano, especially in the high range, contrasts dramatically with her deep, dark voice, but both artists share the same feeling for words and music, and both can build on the moods and interpretations of the other. Since they apparently never rehearsed a single note of this album, recording direct the first time they worked each song, their synchronicity is especially remarkable.
Experts on the slow, moody jazz ballad, McRae and Shearing play off each other from the first song, "I Don't Stand a Ghost of a Chance," in which the clear, high notes of Shearing's "tinkly" accompaniment set McRae's low range into sharp relief. In the emotional "More Than You Know," Shearing's piano lends a sweetness and even femininity to her dramatic but very quiet treatment of the lyrics. "Gentleman Friend," a toe-tapping, less familiar, and upbeat song (the only one on the CD) features Shearing's jazz variations, McRae's vocal variations, and the two of them coordinating naturally for her scat and his improvisations in the spontaneous conclusion.
Among the exciting (and sometimes unfamiliar) songs here, two stand out for me. "Cloudy Morning" became an instant favorite, with Shearing creating a romantic, moody impression with sounds of thunder in the bass. His singing voice is much darker and deeper than McRae's, of course, and when she answers his lyrics, she does so with an uncharacteristic delicacy which makes the harmony of their duet a "chicken skin moment.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Best of Concord a lable for jazz lovers 28 Mar 2013
By phoenix
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Two great artists together for the first time. Check out more items on this great lable. Rosemary clooney, Scott Hamilton.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sheer magic. 3 Jun 2006
By Mary Whipple HALL OF FAME TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
As one who is accustomed to hearing Carmen McRae, a huge favorite, accompanied by a sax or other instruments of low timbre, I was unprepared for the magic which occurs here in this 1980 album, where she records with George Shearing for the first time. Shearing's light touch on piano, especially in the high range, contrasts dramatically with her deep, dark voice, but both artists share the same feeling for words and music, and both can build on the moods and interpretations of the other. Since they apparently never rehearsed a single note of this album, recording direct the first time they worked each song, their synchronicity is especially remarkable.

Experts on the slow, moody jazz ballad, McRae and Shearing play off each other from the first song, "I Don't Stand a Ghost of a Chance," in which the clear, high notes of Shearing's "tinkly" accompaniment set McRae's low range into sharp relief. In the emotional "More Than You Know," Shearing's piano lends a sweetness and even femininity to her dramatic but very quiet treatment of the lyrics. "Gentleman Friend," a toe-tapping, less familiar, and upbeat song (the only one on the CD) features Shearing's jazz variations, McRae's vocal variations, and the two of them coordinating naturally for her scat and his improvisations in the spontaneous conclusion.

Among the exciting (and sometimes unfamiliar) songs here, two stand out for me. "Cloudy Morning" became an instant favorite, with Shearing creating a romantic, moody impression with sounds of thunder in the piano bass. His singing voice is much darker and deeper than McRae's, of course, and when she answers his lyrics, she does so with an uncharacteristic delicacy which makes the harmony of their duet a "chicken skin moment.
Read more ›
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.9 out of 5 stars  8 reviews
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Jazz Royalty Meets 14 Aug 2001
By "fastfeet76" - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Dinah, Billie, Nancy, Shirley Horn, Etta (Jones & James) -- I, personally prefer all of their later life voices; Carmen is no exception. This 1980 session finds her paired with piano great George Shearing. Shearing is obviously a giant in his own right, pioneering a sound in the 50's and 60's that was purely his creation. Fortunately for vocalists he is what they consider a singer's piano player (in great company with folks like Sir Roland Hanna, Hank Jones and Tommy Flanagan). When backing a singer of McRae's magnitude he lays back and grooves, never infringing on the vocals, simply making them all the better. (For more proof of this check out his recordings with Nancy Wilson, Mel Torme and Peggy Lee) A most welcomed surprise from this session is a vocal duet between McRae and Shearing that is simply magic. Carmen's reading of "If I Should Lose You" is haunting. And she is in her finest swingin' form on "Gentleman Friend" -- Dig Shearing's 2-fisted playing on the latter track, sounds like a whole rhythm section in his left hand. Mcrae fans and Shearing fans alike should truly appreciate the history that is made when 2 musicians of this magnitude record together.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars McRae in top form... 8 April 2000
By Aaron - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Every album Carmen McRae recorded is worth hearing, Miss McRae had impeccable taste, so if her name is on the cover buy it. This particular session is very intimate, with just George Shearing at the piano. You might want to try first "Here To Stay" on Decca, but this Cd is worth acquiring, as are most McRae reissues.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sheer Magic 25 Nov 2005
By Mary Whipple - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
As one who is accustomed to hearing Carmen McRae, a huge favorite, accompanied by a sax or other instruments of low timbre, I was unprepared for the magic which occurs here in this 1980 album, where she records with George Shearing for the first time. Shearing's light touch on piano, especially in the high range, contrasts dramatically with her deep, dark voice, but both artists share the same feeling for words and music, and both can build on the moods and interpretations of the other. Since they apparently never rehearsed a single note of this album, recording direct the first time they worked each song, their synchronicity is especially remarkable.

Experts on the slow, moody jazz ballad, McRae and Shearing play off each other from the first song, "I Don't Stand a Ghost of a Chance," in which the clear, high notes of Shearing's "tinkly" accompaniment set McRae's low range into sharp relief. In the emotional "More Than You Know," Shearing's piano lends a sweetness and even femininity to her dramatic but very quiet treatment of the lyrics. "Gentleman Friend," a toe-tapping, less familiar, and upbeat song (the only one on the CD) features Shearing's jazz variations, McRae's vocal variations, and the two of them coordinating naturally for her scat and his improvisations in the spontaneous conclusion.

Among the exciting (and sometimes unfamiliar) songs here, two stand out for me. "Cloudy Morning" became an instant favorite, with Shearing creating a romantic, moody impression with sounds of thunder in the piano bass. His singing voice is much darker and deeper than McRae's, of course, and when she answers his lyrics, she does so with an uncharacteristic delicacy which makes the harmony of their duet a "chicken skin moment." "Too Late Now," contains a haunting piano intro, as Shearing creates clear, bell-like chords, arpeggios, runs, and key changes for 2:41 minutes before McRae enters quietly to maintain the mood and sadness.

A brilliant collaboration between two of the great stars of jazz, this CD features both stars at their best, but Shearing's piano also makes McRae sound more vulnerable--less dramatically assertive than usual--as she sings torchy and impassioned lyrics--a lovely change of pace. Mary Whipple
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sheer magic. 6 Nov 2005
By Mary Whipple - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
As one who is accustomed to hearing Carmen McRae, a huge favorite, accompanied by a sax or other instruments of low timbre, I was unprepared for the magic which occurs here in this 1980 album, where she records with George Shearing for the first time. Shearing's light touch on piano, especially in the high range, contrasts dramatically with her deep, dark voice, but both artists share the same feeling for words and music, and both can build on the moods and interpretations of the other. Since they apparently never rehearsed a single note of this album, recording direct the first time they worked each song, their synchronicity is especially remarkable.

Experts on the slow, moody jazz ballad, McRae and Shearing play off each other from the first song, "I Don't Stand a Ghost of a Chance," in which the clear, high notes of Shearing's "tinkly" accompaniment set McRae's low range into sharp relief. In the emotional "More Than You Know," Shearing's piano lends a sweetness and even femininity to her dramatic but very quiet treatment of the lyrics. "Gentleman Friend," a toe-tapping, less familiar, and upbeat song (the only one on the CD) features Shearing's jazz variations, McRae's vocal variations, and the two of them coordinating naturally for her scat and his improvisations in the spontaneous conclusion.

Among the exciting (and sometimes unfamiliar) songs here, two stand out for me. "Cloudy Morning" became an instant favorite, with Shearing creating a romantic, moody impression with sounds of thunder in the piano bass. His singing voice is much darker and deeper than McRae's, of course, and when she answers his lyrics, she does so with an uncharacteristic delicacy which makes the harmony of their duet a "chicken skin moment." "Too Late Now," contains a haunting piano intro, as Shearing creates clear, bell-like chords, arpeggios, runs, and key changes for 2:41 minutes before McRae enters quietly to maintain the mood and sadness.

A brilliant collaboration between two of the great stars of jazz, this CD features both stars at their best, but Shearing's piano also makes McRae sound more vulnerable--less dramatically assertive than usual--as she sings torchy and impassioned lyrics--a lovely change of pace. n Mary Whipple
5.0 out of 5 stars Unconventional (Great) Vocal! 12 Jun 2011
By ByronC - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Given that Carmen McRae and George Shearing are two of the "Giants of Jazz" and work well together in this collaboration (as Shearing has done with Peggy Lee, Nancy Wilson, Nat King Cole, John Pizzarelli, Mel Torme, etc). What blew my socks off was the album titled number sung by Shearing! God, how I miss both of them, but they have left us with plenty to enjoy.
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