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Rivers: A Voyage into the Heart of Britain: A Journey into the Heart of Britain (River Journeys) Paperback – 23 Jul 2009


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Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton (23 July 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0340918632
  • ISBN-13: 978-0340918630
  • Product Dimensions: 18.4 x 2.9 x 23.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 77,242 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'Rivers by Griff Rhys Jones was a runaway winner in this category; totally engaging, entertaining and appealing to the senses, just a wonderful gentle and enjoyable read'. (The Travel Press Awards 2010 judge's citation.)

About the Author

Griff Rhys Jones was born in Cardiff in 1953. He is a well-known comedian, actor and writer whose television credits include Not the Nine O'Clock News, Alas Smith and Jones, Restoration, Mountains and Rivers.

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Big Jim TOP 100 REVIEWER on 15 Aug 2009
Format: Paperback
This a lively, humorous book written to coincide with the ongoing TV series on BBC. The episodic nature of the concept does lead to a "bitty" style however so the book doesn't altogether coalesce into a cohesive narrative whole. However this doesn't detract too much from an interesting series of incidents, interviews and some downright crazy behaviour where the author as often as not ends up cold and wet. One major issue I have however is the poor production values that appear to have occurred here, disappointing coming from the usually reliable "Beeb"
Some of the photographs used are out of focus and quite frankly amateurish and poorly laid out. There are also numerous "typos" and misspelled words. Even the opening map has the River Derwent and the city of Glasgow in the wrong locations. Hopefully a decent proofreader can be found for the next print run as this did spoil a lot of my enjoyment of this book, hence the three stars where 4 would be more appropriate for the actual content.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Michael Watson TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 29 July 2009
Format: Paperback
Depending on your view of Griff Rhys Jones as a presenter, this book may well be better than the 5-part TV series - the one accompanying the other.

Whichever format of presentation you prefer, this book is a fitting pictorial (and wittily written) testament to the history and character of the UK's rivers.

Some, sadly long neglected, others still vibrant and fast flowing at times, the author literally dives into the waters running through our countryside and our cities, He delves into their history and touches their soul; he tries his hand at several somewhat risky escapades.

Always accompanied by his labrador, this makes for an illuminating insight into the veins of our industrial, our commercial and our historical lifeblood. Fascinating.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ann on 21 Sep 2009
Format: Paperback
I loved the television series which prompted me to purchase this book and I wasn't disappointed! His style of writing and descriptions are very easy to read and even if you didn't see the programme you are able to conjur up a mental picture of that particular journey. The accompanying photographs are magnificent!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas Casley TOP 500 REVIEWER on 14 Sep 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In his introduction, Griff states that his writing "is a fragmented account of an illusory experience made over a disjointed period of time, not really a guidebook. In case you were wondering." But more than most books of television series, this one mirrors it closely, his five chapters being based on the five episodes of the series. And for those who do not have a television, the series followed Griff on five journeys along and between rivers and their watersheds, meeting people along the way who assume he knows what he's doing. Like the series, it's a very bitty book, which is both its charm and its failing. (It's a shame that he did not cover a whole river's length, although - to be fair - he did make a stab with the River Lea. Nevertheless, each of the rivers here deserves its own series and book in their own right.)

Alas, geography is not Griff's strong point: Montgomeryshire and The Wrekin are not west of Plynlimon but north-east, and the Severn flows not from Shrewsbury's English to Welsh Bridges but vice-versa. On the same page as the latter error, Griff relates how he kicked his dog Cadbury to get him to sit up in the boat for the cameras: I felt like kicking Griff for both his cruelty and ignorance of Salopian topography. But then, reading on, I realised Griff had merely got his bridges in a twist: what he calls the Welsh Bridge is actually the English.

Where the book provides the insight beyond the excellent series is in its ability to transform the scene from the viewer being a mere third-person observer into one where the reader is with Griff in his first person. (You did understand that sentence, didn't you?
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