Rise of a Merchant Prince (The Serpentwar Saga, Book 2) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £8.99
  • You Save: £1.80 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Usually dispatched within 1 to 4 weeks.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Rise of a Merchant Prince... has been added to your Basket
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Tree Savers
Condition: Used: Good
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Rise of a Merchant Prince (The Serpentwar Saga, Book 2): Serpentwar Saga Bk. 2 Paperback – 5 Mar 2009


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£20.72
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.19
£4.78 £0.01
£7.19 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Usually dispatched within 1 to 4 weeks. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Rise of a Merchant Prince (The Serpentwar Saga, Book 2): Serpentwar Saga Bk. 2 + The King's Buccaneer
Price For Both: £14.38

One of these items is dispatched sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Voyager; New Ed edition (5 Mar. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0006497012
  • ISBN-13: 978-0006497011
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 3.2 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 28,697 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Feist is one of the world's leading fantasy writers. His Riftwar and Serpentwar Sagas have been global bestsellers for years.
Born and raised in Southern California, Raymond E. Feist was educated at the University of California, San Diego, where he graduated with honours in Communication Arts. He is the author of the bestselling and critically acclaimed Riftwar Saga.

Product Description

Review

Praise for Raymond E. Feist:

‘Fantasy of epic scope, fast-moving action and vivid imagination’ Washington Post

‘A fine yarn . . . vivid . . . suspenseful . . . the action is non-stop’ Booklist

‘File under guilty pleasure’
Guardian

‘Well-written and distinctly above average… intelligent… intriguing.’
Publishers Weekly

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Author

When did you start writing?
If you mean when did I seriously start writing, that was in 1977, the year I graduated from University. I really got serious a year later which was when I took a rough coming-of-age story and started turning into Magician, my first published novel.

Where do you write?
I have a home office.

What are the pros and cons of being a writer?
The same as with any self-employment: you’re your own boss, you set your own schedule, you determine the quality of the product, etc. The downside is you have no corporate safety net, no unemployment insurance, no health care benefits, no retirement plan, so you bear responsibility for all of those things. It is not a job for the timid.

What writers have inspired you?
Too long a list to cover them all. Anything good, in one fashion or another influences. There are some very obvious names, to begin with: Shakespeare, Marlow, Dickens, the Russians, Twain, Melville, and some slightly less obvious, Sir Walter Scott, Robert Louis Stevenson, Alexander Dumas, Anthony Hope, and the other "boy’s adventure" authors. Also, historical authors like Mary Renault, Rosemary Suttcliff, and Thomas Costain. And the pulp authors: Arthur Conan Doyle, H. Ridder Haggard, A. Merrrit, and among fantasy writers, Fritz Lieber. Toss in as diverse a range of writers as Zane Grey and Louis L’amour in westerns to Dashel Hammett , Raymond Chandler, and John D. McDonald in mystery, to comedic writers like Max Schulman and Dan Jenkins. I could keep going, but that’s the tip of the iceberg.

How important is a sense of place in your writing?
Tough question to answer in brief; every element in a fantasy has to “make sense” to the reader. You can not condescend to your art because it’s “make believe,” so even though the place in which I set my work is a fantasy world, it has to feel “real” structurally, else the reader will ultimately be unhappy.

Do you spend a lot of time researching your novels?
Only enough to convince the reader the characters know what they’re doing. I don’t have to be the expert; I just need to be persuasive.

Do your characters ever surprise you?
All the time. In fact, as I get older, more and more often. I suspect this is a function of my subconscious coming up with better story notions than I had originally planned.

How much of your life and the people around you do you put into your books?
In specific, none of it; in general, all of it. The old saw is that writers write what they know. It’s like what actors call “sense memory.” You have to sell emotion and there has to be a foundation of validity or it will not work. How did it feel when you saw your book in print for the first time? A little disbelieving, and very pleased.

If you weren’t a writer, what would you be doing now?
Probably looking for a job, given this economy. My last one was in the health field as an administrator.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Kurt A. Johnson on 11 Nov. 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In this sequel to Shadow of a Dark Queen, author Raymond Feist takes us back to his magical world of Midkemia. Now that they have returned to the Kingdom of the Isles, Erik von Darkmoor has decided to reenlist in the fight against the dark powers that threaten his world, while Rupert Avery has decided to follow his original plan of marrying a rich merchant's ugly daughter and building a mercantile empire. But, life is going to prove interesting to both. Becoming a merchant prince is no cakewalk, and Roo will find his abilities taxed to the limit. And, the dark power rising in Novindus has not been deterred from its purpose.
Raymond Feist's Riftwar books were great, with epic adventure and magic, while his later books enjoyed a somewhat smaller scope. This book succeeds in walking on both sides of the street. While armies marshal and wizards weave great spells, we also follow the life of a man trying to build up his wealth and his personal life. And, I must say that it succeeds in doing both admirably.
I love stories of wizards and armies, and one gets a bunch of that here. But, I must say that I was surprised at how much I enjoyed Mr. Feist's tale of Roo Avery. I was captivated by the choices he made, both for good and for ill.
I am surprised to say that I enjoyed this book as much as I did the Riftwar books and Shadow of a Dark Queen! The action is gripping, grabbing you right on the first page, and drawing you along. Yep, this is a great book, and a wonderful addition to my fantasy library. I loved to presence of Boldar Blood, and hope that Mr. Feist will consider writing a book that develops the Hall of Worlds more!
I loved this book, and highly recommend it to you!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By johnmark.horton@sssltd.co.uk on 15 Jun. 2001
Format: Paperback
One of the great things about Feist is that you never get two dimensional characters. One moment you are reading this book admiring Roo's merchant manouvers and at others nearly despising his total lack of interest in his family. You certainly believe that the driving force behind Rupert is entirely selfish, but his wit and humour and in the end his brotherly love for Erik show that Roo has the capability of being more. Whilst the story concentrates on Roo we do follow the 'Captain' and Erik to Novinous again and whilst this is a relativly small part of the book it is still able to grab you by the throat and you just won't be able to put the book down until you know the fate of all involved. A perfect second book that adds depth and colour to the story and sets the stage for the breath taking action found in the next book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By genejoke on 22 Mar. 2006
Format: Paperback
After the introductions of new characters and the action in the first volume of the serpent war saga this initially seems an odd way of following on.
The focus shifts from Erik to his friend Rupert "roo" Avery who's ambition is to become a horribly rich merchant.
The emphisis of this volume is on Roos clever deals to make money, his loves and losses and struggles as he gradually makes his dreams a reality.
The main storyline is pushed to the back burner as it develops slowly as we learn much about the inner workings of Krondor, the capitol of the western realm.
A different book to the first volume, but equally as enjoyable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By A. Cresswell TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 17 April 2013
Format: Paperback
I'm reviewing Feists' (and those involved with him) works in Chronological order. Unfortunately for some books there are new books and covers being re-released in March 2013 so reviews for the old books can no longer be posted.

Anyway this review is for the chronological reading of books by Feist and others that all link Medkemia and Kelewan and form the Riftwar Saga, Legacy and beyond. This one is for Rise of a Merchant Prince.

The order is:-

Magician 5 stars
Jimmy the Hand 2 Stars
Horored Enemy 4 stars
Murder in LaMuT 3 stars.
Daughter of the Empire 5 stars
Silverthorn 4.5 stars
Darkness at Sethanon 5 stars
Servant of the Empire 5 stars
Krondor: The Betrayal 3 Stars
Mistress of the Empire 5 stars
Krondor: The Assassins 3 Stars
Krondor: Tear of the Gods 3 Stars
Prince of the Blood 5.5 Stars
The Kings Buccaneer 4 Stars
Shadow of a Dark Queen 6 STARS !!
RISE OF A MERCHANT PRINCE 3.5 STARS

Rise of a Merchant Prince is Book 2 of the Serpent war saga. It's more of a `connector' from "Shadow of a Dark Queen" to "Rage of a Demon King". So by this I mean Shadow of a Dark Queen was a thrilling introduction into a whole new saga and stood brilliantly on it's own and opened up all sorts of questions about who the queen is, her intentions and the coming army. Rage of a Demon King is fabulous, especially the prologue regarding the demons. Brilliant !!! I'd love Janny wurts to do for this (The Demon World) as she did for the Tsuranni world of Kelewan. Anyway in between these two major events, Feist finds he has to do a lot of preparation and staging for the Rage of a Demon King story. This is that staging. The story itself is OK, nothing special but it is important for setting the stage.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 Feb. 2000
Format: Paperback
This book was good enough to keep you reading but the main story about Roo just does not make the grade. It is a fiction book but the story of Roo's rise to the ritchest man in the kingdom is just stupid. The whole way through the book it just did not feel right. Roo an uneducated, twenty year old, nobody rising so fast is just too unrealistic for me. The rest of the book is very good though. Erik and Calis returning to Novindus makes the book worth reading.
In short read it for the good bits and so you can read the next one but do not expect a spectacular read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback