Start reading Ring Around the Sun on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here or start reading now with a free Kindle Reading App.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available
 

Ring Around the Sun [Kindle Edition]

Clifford D. Simak
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

Kindle Price: £2.48 includes VAT* & free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

Free Kindle Reading App Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition £2.48  
Hardcover --  
Paperback --  
Unknown Binding --  
Kindle Daily Deal
Kindle Daily Deal: Up to 70% off
Each day we unveil a new book deal at a specially discounted price--for that day only. Learn more about the Kindle Daily Deal or sign up for the Kindle Daily Deal Newsletter to receive free e-mail notifications about each day's deal.

Book Description

Jay Vickers was an ordinary man, or so he thought. All he wanted was to be left in peace to finish his next book. However, strange things started happenin - from his discovery of a mouse that was not a mouse, to the visit of an old neighbor that was not a man. Or at least he was not an ordinary man.



For as it turned out, neither was Jay Vickers. This is the story of human mutation - the next step in the evolution of the species. What if mutants walked among us already? What if they were organized? What if they had unbelievable powers, such as the ability to cross between alternate worlds or dimensions at will, or to intuitively reach the absolutely correct answer by intuition or "hunch", or to telepathically reach out to the stars?



Such supermen would automatically try to conquer lesser men, would they not? Or would they do everything in their power to free the rest of humanity from slavery and suffering? Just what would the political and corporate powers-that-be do to keep their power and their slaves? How would mutants undermine the power of these bosses to set mankind free?



This is a story of unlimited freedom, of worlds without end, ready for the taking. It is also the story of powerful, benevolent beings that exist only to help those who need that help. This is a future of a lop-sided mechanical culture of technology that could provide creature comfort for a few, but not human justice or security for the many. It is a future of hate, and war, and worry. Nothing like the way the world really turned out - after all, there couldn't really be an underground of mutants working to free humanity . . . could there?



Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 592 KB
  • Print Length: 186 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: B002A0RXBW
  • Publisher: Gateway (29 Sept. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005OA89OA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #222,426 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking, and yet still entertaining. 12 Aug. 2009
By R. F. Stevens HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
A typical Simak novel; with a warm protagonist, seeing the best in people, up against the system, and perhaps he is right, but maybe not.

The world is flooded with useful new technology, eg razor blades that stay sharp and reliable cars. People seem to be heading for a better life. But where is the better life? Maybe they are leaving this world.

It draws you in, the writing is faultless, and you find that time has passed when you only meant to take a quick glance. I picked it up for a quick thumb through to remind myself about it for this review, but that was four hours ago and I read it at a sitting.

Brilliant, and it's one of those with the deeper message that makes you think. What will be the next stage of humanity? Who will replace us, like we are supposed to have replaced the Neanderthals.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Uneven, but very good 30 April 1998
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
As one begins reading this book Phillip Dick comes to mind. That however is not a bad thing. The first 11 chapters seem to really interest me, then it kind of went into a lull. Around chapter 30 or so it gets interesting again. It is a good read though, but Dick did it better. (Even though Dick came after Simak)
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3.0 out of 5 stars A bit dated 8 Mar. 2014
By Redrag
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I read this when I was young and just loved the spinning top. But now it seems all a bit old fashioned. Maybe its worth an extra star if you want something a bit lyrical. It has some lovely language at the beginning on a battlefield. Another minor annoyance is that has obviously been scanned from a paper version. And no one has bothered to proof read the scan so there are loads of errors. I think Simak is worthy of a bit more respect than that!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  24 reviews
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worlds without end- human potential without limit 7 July 2004
By OAKSHAMAN - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Jay Vickers was an ordinary man, or so he thought. All he wanted was to be left in peace to finish his next book. However, strange things started happening- from his discovery of a mouse that was not a mouse, to the visit of an old neighbor that was not a man. Or at least he was not an ordinary man. For as it turned out, neither was Jay Vickers.
This is the story of human mutation- the next step in the evolution of the species. What if mutants walked among us already? What if they were organized? What if they had unbelievable powers, such as the ability to cross between alternate worlds or dimensions at will, or to intuitively reach the absolutely correct answer by intuition or "hunch", or to telepathically reach out to the stars? Such supermen would automatically try to conquer lesser men, would they not? Or would they do everything in their power to free the rest of humanity from slavery and suffering? Just what would the political and corporate powers- that- be do to keep their power and their slaves? How would mutants undermine the power of these bosses to set mankind free?
This is a story of unlimited freedom, of worlds without end, ready for the taking. It is also the story of powerful, benevolent beings that exist only to help those who need that help. Simak sets this optimism off against the far-flung future- of 1987. This is a future of a lop-sided mechanical culture of technology that could provide creature comfort for a few, but not human justice or security for the many. It is a future of hate, and war, and worry. Nothing like the way the world really turned out....
Years ago when I first read this novel the uncanny "coincidences" with my own life gave me chills.
But then, there couldn't really be an underground of mutants working to free humanity... could there?
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderous book that I need to read again. 27 Feb. 1999
By Cathy Lane - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I read this Simak offering so many years ago that I honestly can't recall how long it's been. All I know is that I really NEED to read it again. Simak was one of my all-time favorite SF writers. It helped in no small way that he lived and worked in my hometown of Minneapolis, Minnesota, and that his fictional settings were so familiar to me because he wrote of places I could see just down the road. His gentleness, good humor and his graceful way of writing only endeared him to me more. Please, Mr. Publisher, see your way clear to reissuing this grand old piece of fine science fiction!
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book! 20 Jan. 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This is the first Simak book that I've read, and I loved it! It's about a future where new everlasting products are dominating the world economy, and shutting down nearly all business. Jay Vickers is just beginning to realize the consequences of these new products when he sees a way to get out of the economic collapse. Like many of my favorite books, this one starts out great and you think you understand the plot completely. Then, all of a sudden, WHAM! The scope of the book explodes into something huge! As cool as that was, the characterization of Vickers and the other characters was the best part of the book. Read this book, you won't regret it!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic work from one of sf's strongest thinkers 14 Oct. 2014
By TChris - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
First published in 1953 after being serialized in a science fiction magazine, Ring Around the Sun continues to hold profound meaning for the modern reader. Simak's early take on the multiverse theory (which he describes as a series of worlds, each traveling a second behind the last) anticipates a theme that would later become commonplace in science fiction. The novel also addresses evolution in the guise of mutants who have abilities that are unavailable to most people. They aren't super-powered, but they have a strong intuitive sense that helps them understand people and situations, causing them to gravitate to positions of leadership.

None of these themes are known to Jay Vickers as the novel begins. He knows only that new products are appearing -- razor blades that never grow dull, affordable cars that will last forever, houses that are freely available to people with low incomes, artificial carbohydrates that promise to end famine. The value of these remarkable achievements is disputed by those who view them as a challenge to an economy that depends on new product sales for continuing employment of factory workers. Simak doesn't use the phrase "planned obsolescence" (the phrase was not popularized until 1954) but, always a cutting edge thinker, Simak's novel illustrates both the benefit and harms of deliberately manufacturing products that will require replacement.

As Vickers becomes aware of rumblings about a conspiracy to destroy the American economy (given the time frame, communists are the natural suspects), he is approached by a man who blames mutants for the products. Vickers eventually learns the truth, and learns some surprising things about his true nature -- surprising to the reader, not just to Vickers.

The novel's themes -- the tension between business and consumers, suspicion of and discrimination against those who are labeled as "different," enslavement to technology and commerce, the advantages of a simple lifestyle rooted in self-sufficiency, the desire to escape mundane reality by living an invented "second life," the nature of evolution and the purpose of life -- are enduring. Although decades have passed since its publication, nothing about Ring Around the Sun feels dated. It is a classic work of sf from one of the genre's strongest thinkers.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worlds without end- human potential without limit 15 Jun. 2006
By OAKSHAMAN - Published on Amazon.com
Jay Vickers was an ordinary man, or so he thought. All he wanted was to be left in peace to finish his next book. However, strange things started happening- from his discovery of a mouse that was not a mouse, to the visit of an old neighbor that was not a man. Or at least he was not an ordinary man. For as it turned out, neither was Jay Vickers.

This is the story of human mutation- the next step in the evolution of the species. What if mutants walked among us already? What if they were organized? What if they had unbelievable powers, such as the ability to cross between alternate worlds or dimensions at will, or to intuitively reach the absolutely correct answer by intuition or "hunch", or to telepathically reach out to the stars? Such supermen would automatically try to conquer lesser men, would they not? Or would they do everything in their power to free the rest of humanity from slavery and suffering? Just what would the political and corporate powers- that- be do to keep their power and their slaves? How would mutants undermine the power of these bosses to set mankind free?

This is a story of unlimited freedom, of worlds without end, ready for the taking. It is also the story of powerful, benevolent beings that exist only to help those who need that help. Simak sets this optimism off against the far-flung future- of 1987. This is a future of a lop-sided mechanical culture of technology that could provide creature comfort for a few, but not human justice or security for the many. It is a future of hate, and war, and worry. Nothing like the way the world really turned out....

Years ago when I first read this novel the uncanny "coincidences" with my own life gave me chills.

But then, there couldn't really be an underground of mutants working to free humanity... could there?
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category