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Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride

Dmitri Hvorostovsky, Gergiev Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
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Product details

  • Performer: Gennadi Bezzubenkov, Marina Shaguch, Dmitri Hvorostovsky, Sergei Alexashkin
  • Orchestra: Kirov Opera Chorus, Kirov Opera Orchestra
  • Conductor: Valery Gergiev
  • Composer: Nikolay Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov
  • Audio CD (11 Oct 1999)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Philips
  • ASIN: B00002DF34
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 248,912 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         


Disc 1:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - OvertureValery Gergiev 7:070.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 1 - Scene 1 "S uma neydyot krasavitsa"Valery Gergiev 7:060.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 1 - Scene 2 "Da vot i gosti"Nikolai Gassiev 8:150.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 1 - Scene 3 "Khozyain! Prikazal by ty"Nikolai Gassiev 5:520.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 1 - Dance & chorus "Kak za rechen'koy yar khmel'"Nikolai Gassiev 5:030.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 1 - Scene 4 "Zdorovo, krestnitsa"Olga Borodina 8:360.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 1 - Scene 5 "Bomeli"Nikolai Gassiev 3:470.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride / Act 1 - "Zachem ty"Olga Borodina 8:490.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 2 - Scene 1 "Vot Bog privyol"Valery Gergiev 6:490.79  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 2 - Scene 2 "Ish', vecher-to kakoy"Ljubov Sokolova 1:500.79  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 2 - Aria "V Novgorode"Olga Markova-Mikhailenko 6:450.79  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 2 - Scene 3 "Akh, chto so mnoy"Gennadi Bezzubenkov 2:330.79  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 2 - Quartet "Pogodi, moya milaya"Gennadi Bezzubenkov 3:460.79  Buy MP3 
Listen14. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 2 - IntermezzoValery Gergiev 1:520.79  Buy MP3 


Disc 2:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 2 - Scene 4 "Razvedala"Nikolai Gassiev 8:570.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride / Act 2 - Scene 5 "Vot do chego ya dozhila"Olga Borodina 3:230.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 2 - Allegro vivo "Proshchay, Ivan Sergeich"Nikolai Gassiev 2:420.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 2 - Scene 6 "To ne sokoly"Valery Gergiev 1:150.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 3 - IntroductionValery Gergiev 1:520.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 3 - Scene 1 "Chto Gospoda gnevit'"Gennadi Bezzubenkov 4:030.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 3 - Scene 2 "Skazhi, boyarin"Valery Gergiev0:380.39  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 3 - Arietta "Chto sdelal by"Valery Gergiev 1:050.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 3 - Scene 3 "A vot i myod"Gennadi Bezzubenkov 1:230.79  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 3 - Arioso "Vot, batyushka, vpustili"Gennadi Bezzubenkov 5:210.79  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 3 - Aria "Tucha nenastnaya"Valery Gergiev 2:380.79  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 3 - Allegro moderato "Ved' ya zhe govoril tebe"Valery Gergiev 1:530.79  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 3 - Scene 4 "Pobol'she zhenikhu"Valery Gergiev 1:170.79  Buy MP3 
Listen14. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 3 - Sextet with chorus "Day Bog chtob dom u vas"Gennadi Bezzubenkov 3:110.79  Buy MP3 
Listen15. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 3 - Song in honour of the couple "Povelichat' by nam"Valery Gergiev 1:000.79  Buy MP3 
Listen16. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 3 - Scene 5 "K tebe idut boyare"Ljubov Sokolova 2:130.79  Buy MP3 
Listen17. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 4 - Introduction & Scene 1 "Zabylasya"Gennadi Bezzubenkov 5:450.79  Buy MP3 
Listen18. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 4 - Scene 2 "Bol'shoy poklon boyarinu"Gennadi Bezzubenkov 3:150.79  Buy MP3 
Listen19. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 4 - Quintet with chorus "Zagublena stradalitsa tsarevna"Gennadi Bezzubenkov 6:320.79  Buy MP3 
Listen20. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 4 - Scene & Aria :Ivan Sergeich, khochesh'"Valery Gergiev 5:410.79  Buy MP3 
Listen21. Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tsar's Bride - original version Tsarskaya Nevesta by Lev Mey - Act 4 - Scene 3 "Net, net, ne sterpet'"Gennadi Bezzubenkov 5:370.79  Buy MP3 


Product Description

PHI 4626182; PHILIPS;

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THANK GOD FOR GERGIEV 25 Mar 2000
Format:Audio CD
The Philips Kirov series has been one of delights of recent years. And perhaps the highlight of this project has been the wonderful Rimsky-Korsakov recordings: his operas at long last reaching a wider public, and demonstrating what a fine composer he was. I cannot imagine a finer advocate of these works than Gergiev and his marvellous Kirov ensemble.
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Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars  16 reviews
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fine revival of R-K opera undeserving of neglect 13 Mar 2005
By David H. Spence - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Out of all the four new operatic releases by Gergiev and Kirov the year this was released, this one by far is the newest of the crop. There is much impressive about this new recording, but something missing in the whole effort for it to really have cut to the heart of the matter. Among Russian opera fans, this is considered to be Rimsky-Korsakov's one 'verismo' opera. Apart from the one vulgar chemist in the mix, any hint of magic in his other operas is gone, and thereby as well the human element is more prominent in this piece. Some hint of Puccinian pathos, for instance for his 'little women' could be construed to have been written into the altogether rather brief, if not fully developed character of Marfa. Lyubasha and Gryaznoy make up the difference, with the extent to which Rimsky-Korsakov very ably fleshes these two characters out. The humanity of both of them gets as satisfactory and complex treatment as that of almost any other characters do in Russian opera. This is the second opera by Rimsky-Korsakov to treat a plot related to at least an episode in the life and reign of Ivan the Terrible, the first having been his first opera, Maid of Pskov. Ivan, in this case adn more or less a deus ex machina of sorts, is a mute part, as opposed to being quite close to taking top honors as protagonist in the earlier opera.

Gergiev plays the work in a most patrician manner - elegance, eloquence of the sound taking priority over much else. The orchestra of the Mariinsky Theater, as it is called now, offer playing of the highest calibre for him, nevertheless. Rimsky-Korsakov wrote this opera, in a way, as a tribute to his fallen rival, Tchaikovsky, so there is some merit to that. At the same time, the brilliance and panache of the execution of so much of the music, as performed here, takes over to the extent of glibly covering some of the most elemental facets of this enigmatic work. One's taste for a saltier approach to especially some of the choral passages, and to the wild anguish of the final scene, remains unfulfilled.

Most impressive in this cast is Olga Borodina as Lyubasha, just leaving to the imagination what her Amneris at the Met must have been like this season, in (in a number of subtle ways) a similar enough Verdi opera. Impassioned, voluptuous in tone to full measure, and incisive with the words, she is about all that anyone could ask, and almost surpassing Irina Arkhipova on the 1970's Bolshoi Melodiya set. Dmitri Hvorostovsky is also good and sympathetic as Gryaznoy, but shows a litle effort at delivering the earthier and more venal aspects of the character. In the effort, he comes out sounding just a tad bit too earnest for his own good. Marina Shaguch is the strident Marfa, perfectly adequate in relaxed passages, of which there are few in this part. She only finally comes into her own in her final aria. She is heard to better effect in Kaschhey the Deathless, also released by Philips last month. Evgeny Akimov is the thin, slightly reedy sounding Lykov, adequate enough in arias but not matching tone in duet with Shaguch well. The remainder of the cast is simply adequate, with the exception of Lyubov Sokolova as Petrovna (minor role), who is very nicely distinctive from the rest. Nikolai Gassiev puts in a fine cameo appearance as the lovestruck chemist who with Lyubasha and to help fulfill her vindictive ends, lets her strike up a mephistophelian deal of sorts with him. Given it is Olga Borodina, I certainly would not mind.

Five stars for Borodina, three for most of the rest. Given that the price is right so much more often so many places, the contributions of both Borodina and Hvorostovsky, and the relative and mostly undeserving obscurity of the material, I bump this set up to four stars.
23 of 28 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars not doing what comes naturally 4 Sep 2000
By Julian Grant - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This is by and large a great performance, particularly Olga Borodina as Lyubasha, great conducting and choral singing - true, Marina Shaguch is'nt as consistent as I've heard her, and is no match in terms of charisma and opulence for Galina Vishnevskaya on the old 70's recording, but she suggests the passive character of Marfa well. Sobakin (Bezzubenkov) and Griaznoi (Hvorostovsky) give characterful performances of great vocal stature.
BUT .... not one of the previous reviews mentions the music! This is one of Rimsky's most performed operas simply because it has a more conventional story with love interest and vengeance (and doesn't have the incredible scenic demands of his other operas, flying swans, invisible cities, melting snow-maidens etc.) It has to be said that much of the music is conventional and uninspired - Rimsky was a peculiar opera composer in that he was not touched by portraying the human condition, he excelled in depicting the legendary and fantastical. There are fine pages in 'The Tsar's Bride', a spirited overture, Marfa's two arias, which are gorgeously melodic and memorable, a few choruses, and he does manage to make the final scene work, but there is much in-between that is manufactured. If you are new to Rimsky's operas, and are curious, don't start with this one - hear him at full stretch re-inventing a fairy-tale Russia in Sadko or Kitezh, not trying to be Tchaikovsky, or a Russo-Italian halfway between bel-canto and verismo. The quality of the music in those latter works is much superior to this - Gergiev has taken 'Snow Maiden' into the Kirov's repertoire - hopefully they'll record that.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best starter for Russian opera 27 Jun 2003
By "sfdcan" - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I think back to the day I first listened to this recording with nostalgia. This is the first Russian opera that I have listened to and I consider myself extremely lucky to have chosen this one. The music is simply gorgeous and there are some stunning vocal talents on display here.
Please forgive my superficial cliche when I say that the music sounds very "Russian" in a mesmerising way. Unlike Prokofiev and Shostakovich, which tend to be more dissonant and atonal (perhaps more typical of 20th Century music forms), this opera is heart-renchingly melodious. Again, by comparison, this is not the Bellini/Donizetti influence on other Russian compositions such as Glinka's Ruslan and Lyudmila (which sounds very "Italian" in my view). The dramatic force of the opera has been relayed by other reviewers. I only add that the haunting slavic chords do not disappoint: check out the Introduction in Scene 1 of Act 4. On to the singers.
Of ALL the Russian sopranos I have heard, Shaguch is my favourite. Her technique may not be perfect: her singing is described by some as initially "edgy" or "breathy", though this is not as off-putting as it sounds and she settles very well into her roles soon enough. But where the role calls for an innocent, young voice, MOST off-putting for me is the heavy, full rich vocals that are so RAMPANT within many recordings of Russian opera. What's worse is that this is often accompanied by a violent wobble that is forever beyond me. Shaguch, sounding every bit as Russian as she is/should, has a beautiful, youthfully sweet and compelling voice, with a moving vibrato (NOT wobble). Her interpretation of the role is immediately convincing and her mad scene is the stuff of legends! She would have been the IDEAL Fevroniya for Gergiev's recording of Kitezh but the only other available Kirov recording featuring this wonderful soprano is the fairy-tale opera "Kaschey the Immortal," also by Rimsky-Korsakov. She is also ideally paired with the youthful tenor of Evgyeny Akimov. Akimov sounds a little strained during the beautiful quartet in Scene 3 of Act 2, but gives a shining performance otherwise.
Dmitri Hvorostovy's dramatic baritone reminds me of a modern Sherril Milnes: warm yet firm, emotional and vocally stunning. His portrayal of Gryaznoy's arrogance, bravado, scheming and dispair is grippingly convincing.
When I heard the first notes sung by Olga Borodina's Lyubasha, I was immediately struck by (forgive the rhetoric) her smooth, honeyed tone! "Zdorovo klostnij" caught my breath in my throat. On the down-side, however, she could be more dramatic. Impressive as the recitative in Scene 4 is, her violent death in the final scene passes in silence. It is mainly her vocal gift that brings off her role so well.
Nikolai Gassiev's Bomyelius is also noteworthy. His character's craftiness and lust comes across very well. His appeals of "Lyumi menja" carry a strain that shows Bomyeli's sexual frustration.
Gennady Bezzubenkov's Sobakin is a towering monument. Here we encounter the deep Russian bass that has been so famous. The low last note at the end of his lament in Scene 1 of Act 4 separates the men from the boys...it CANNOT be faked! Only a TRUE bass can hit, let alone hold such a note.
It is unfortunate that the more matronly roles in many Russian opera almost always suffer the violent wobble I described earlier. Irina Loskutova's Domna Saburova is almost rediculous at first. This takes some getting used to. True, there are some beautiful moments, but the wobble is so vocally ungracefull it sounds as if she sings the notes AROUND her vocal line rather than follow the tune. This, for me, was the biggest set-back within the recording, but with such stunning music, the poorly sung role is actually compensated somewhat. The other roles are all well sung.
Yet another achievement for Gergiev and the Kirov Chorus and Orchestra. Gergiev conducts with feeling and the chorus is well synchronised. Though perhaps not as imaginatively as von Karajan or Abbado may have done, the score is well-conducted. Moreover, the fact that neither conducter actually DID (on record at least) makes Gergiev an undisputed hero.
From here, I would then recommend von Karajan's Rimsky-Korsakov arrangement of Mussorgsky's Boris Godinov (Decca); as well as Abbado's Shostakovich arrangement of the same opera (Deutche Grammophon). Following this, Abbado's Khovanshchina (also composed by Mussorgsky) would be a good idea....then, the world of Russian opera can be your playground!
17 of 24 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Borodina the highlight of new Tsar's Bride 24 Dec 1999
By David H Spence - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Out of all the four new operatic releases by Gergiev and Kirov this year, this one by far is the newest of the crop. There is much impressive about this new recording, but something missing, in the whole effort really cutting to the heart of the matter. Gergiev plays the work in the most Imperial, patrician manner possible. As Rimsky-Korsakov wrote this opera, in a way, as a tribute to his fallen rival, Tchaikovsky, there is some merit in that. At the same time, the brilliance and panache of the execution of so much of the music takes over to the extent of glibly covering some of the most elemental facets of this enigmatic work. One's taste for a saltier approach to especially some of the choral passages, and to the wild anguish of the final scene, remains unfulfilled. Most impressive in the cast is Olga Borodina as Lyubasha, just leaving to the imagination what her Amneris at the Met must have been like this season, in (in a number of subtle ways) a similar enough Verdi opera. Impassioned, voluptuous in tone to full measure, and incisive with the words, she is about all that anyone could ask, and almost surpassing Irina Arkhipova on the 1970's Bolshoi set. Dmitri Hvorostovsky is also good and sympathetic as Gryaznoy, but a little effortful at delivering the earthier and more venal aspects of the character. In the effort, he comes out sounding just a tad bit too earnest for his own good. Marina Shaguch is the strident Marfa, perfectly adequate in relaxed passages, of which there are few in this part, and only finally coming into her own in her final aria. She is heard to better effect in Kaschhey the Deathless, also released by Philips last month. Evgeny Akimov is the thin, reedy sounding Lykov, not matching tone in duet with Shaguch well. The remainder of the cast is simply adequate, with the exception of the Petrovna (minor role) of Lyubov Sokolova, who is well above that. Five stars for Borodina, two to three for the rest.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gergiev Sets The Standard 20 Mar 2002
By David A. Wend - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This is a magnificent recording and provides a great introduction to the operas of Rimsky-Korsakov. The story reminds one of Verdi or Bellini might have written in that the story revolves around betrayal, love and jealousy. The story is loosely based on an event from the reign of Ivan IV (the Terrible) whose third wife, the daughter of a Novgorod merchant) died following her wedding. The Tsar is never on stage but his eye falls upon Marfa, whom he surprisingly selects as his bride. Marfa is betrothed to Ivan Lukov but is desired by Grigory Gryaznoy, who wants to discard his current lover, Luybasha. Lyubasha is equally determined to hang onto Gryaznoy. There follows plots and counter-plots with a sinister German named Bomelius dispensing love potions and poisons.
The music is perfectly suited for the intrigue and double-dealing of the story. The famous overture sets the tone for the opera of excitement and is rousingly performed by the Kirov Orchestra. The cast in this recording is superb: Olga Borodina is terrific as Luybasha and Dmitri Horostovski makes an excellent Gryaznoy, a part that is difficult to bring off as a sympathetic villain. Marina Shaguch is great in the role of Marfa, the mad scene being particularly well sung. Valery Gergiev conducts with sensitivity for the drama of the opera and allows the singers full expression of their characters. The Kirov Opera Chorus is on top form.
The Tsar's Bride is popular in Russia but is rarely performed in western countries. I hope that it discovered by opera companies in the US but until then, we have the superb recording.
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