Richard Wagner

We're sorry, but the page you're looking for is no longer available

Top Albums by Richard Wagner (See all 100 albums)


See all 100 albums by Richard Wagner


Image of Richard Wagner
Community contributed image

Biography

The German composer Richard Wagner was born on 22nd May 1813 in Leipzig and was raised by his mother and step-father in Dresden. His step-father, Ludwig Geyer, was an actor and playwright and Wagner's first forays into the creative world were on the stage. Whilst still at school, Wagner wrote the tragic play Leubald which he decided to set to music.

Aged 14 and living in Leipzig, Wagner heard Beethoven's 7th Symphony and from then on Beethoven was a big influence on his music.

Following his time at Leipzig University, Wagner became choir master at the theatre in Würzburg and completed his ... Read more

The German composer Richard Wagner was born on 22nd May 1813 in Leipzig and was raised by his mother and step-father in Dresden. His step-father, Ludwig Geyer, was an actor and playwright and Wagner's first forays into the creative world were on the stage. Whilst still at school, Wagner wrote the tragic play Leubald which he decided to set to music.

Aged 14 and living in Leipzig, Wagner heard Beethoven's 7th Symphony and from then on Beethoven was a big influence on his music.

Following his time at Leipzig University, Wagner became choir master at the theatre in Würzburg and completed his first opera, Die Feen (The Fairies). In 1836 Wagner married the leading lady of the opera house in Magdeburg while he held the position of musical director there. A move to Riga ensued when his wife Christine Wilhelmine "Minna" Planer left him for another man. Reunited in Riga, the couple worked up a large debt and fled to London and Paris.

Wagner was a socialist and was active amongst the German nationalists during his return to Germany. Wagner and his group of leftist supporters were involved in the May Uprising and as a result a warrant was issued for his arrest leading to a move to Zurich for the composer where he lived in exile for 12 years. During his time in Switzerland, Wagner had an affair with a married lady and his wife suffered from depression. Wagner found writing hard to undertake and survived mainly on a pension from friend Julie Ritter until his later years in Zurich during which he began work on his most famous operas - Die Walküre, Das Rheingold, Tristan und Isolde and the Ring Cycle.

In 1858 Minna discovered Wagner's affair and he left alone for Venice which was followed by a period in Paris. While in France, Wagner tried to rekindle his relationship with Minna without success. A few years later, the political ban on Wagner was lifted and he was free to return to Germany. In 1862 he moved to Biebrich in Prussia and an end was put to his marriage.

Wagner made a powerful friend of King Ludwig II in 1864 and his debts were cleared by the King. Thanks to encouragement and financial support from the King, Tristan und Isolde was premiered at the National Theatre in Munich in June 1865, the first premiere of a Wagner opera in almost 15 years. The conductor of the opera was Hans von Bülow whose wife, Cosima, was having an affair with Wagner. After the affair was made public Wagner was asked to leave Munich by King Ludwig II.

Minna, now estranged from Wagner, died in Dresden on 25th January 1866 leading to Cosima asking for a divorce from her husband to allow her to marry Wagner. Hans von Bülow consented in 1870 after Cosima had given birth to two further children by the composer. The couple married on 25th August 1870.

Following time in Bayreuth, Germany, where Wagner began a series of Bayreuth Festivals, the composer completed his final opera Parsifal despite being delayed by health issues. Wagner died during a family trip to Venice on 13th February 1883 at the age of 69. A funerary gondola took Wagner's body down the Grand Canal before it was sent to Bayreuth to be buried in the garden of Villa Wahnfried.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

The German composer Richard Wagner was born on 22nd May 1813 in Leipzig and was raised by his mother and step-father in Dresden. His step-father, Ludwig Geyer, was an actor and playwright and Wagner's first forays into the creative world were on the stage. Whilst still at school, Wagner wrote the tragic play Leubald which he decided to set to music.

Aged 14 and living in Leipzig, Wagner heard Beethoven's 7th Symphony and from then on Beethoven was a big influence on his music.

Following his time at Leipzig University, Wagner became choir master at the theatre in Würzburg and completed his first opera, Die Feen (The Fairies). In 1836 Wagner married the leading lady of the opera house in Magdeburg while he held the position of musical director there. A move to Riga ensued when his wife Christine Wilhelmine "Minna" Planer left him for another man. Reunited in Riga, the couple worked up a large debt and fled to London and Paris.

Wagner was a socialist and was active amongst the German nationalists during his return to Germany. Wagner and his group of leftist supporters were involved in the May Uprising and as a result a warrant was issued for his arrest leading to a move to Zurich for the composer where he lived in exile for 12 years. During his time in Switzerland, Wagner had an affair with a married lady and his wife suffered from depression. Wagner found writing hard to undertake and survived mainly on a pension from friend Julie Ritter until his later years in Zurich during which he began work on his most famous operas - Die Walküre, Das Rheingold, Tristan und Isolde and the Ring Cycle.

In 1858 Minna discovered Wagner's affair and he left alone for Venice which was followed by a period in Paris. While in France, Wagner tried to rekindle his relationship with Minna without success. A few years later, the political ban on Wagner was lifted and he was free to return to Germany. In 1862 he moved to Biebrich in Prussia and an end was put to his marriage.

Wagner made a powerful friend of King Ludwig II in 1864 and his debts were cleared by the King. Thanks to encouragement and financial support from the King, Tristan und Isolde was premiered at the National Theatre in Munich in June 1865, the first premiere of a Wagner opera in almost 15 years. The conductor of the opera was Hans von Bülow whose wife, Cosima, was having an affair with Wagner. After the affair was made public Wagner was asked to leave Munich by King Ludwig II.

Minna, now estranged from Wagner, died in Dresden on 25th January 1866 leading to Cosima asking for a divorce from her husband to allow her to marry Wagner. Hans von Bülow consented in 1870 after Cosima had given birth to two further children by the composer. The couple married on 25th August 1870.

Following time in Bayreuth, Germany, where Wagner began a series of Bayreuth Festivals, the composer completed his final opera Parsifal despite being delayed by health issues. Wagner died during a family trip to Venice on 13th February 1883 at the age of 69. A funerary gondola took Wagner's body down the Grand Canal before it was sent to Bayreuth to be buried in the garden of Villa Wahnfried.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

The German composer Richard Wagner was born on 22nd May 1813 in Leipzig and was raised by his mother and step-father in Dresden. His step-father, Ludwig Geyer, was an actor and playwright and Wagner's first forays into the creative world were on the stage. Whilst still at school, Wagner wrote the tragic play Leubald which he decided to set to music.

Aged 14 and living in Leipzig, Wagner heard Beethoven's 7th Symphony and from then on Beethoven was a big influence on his music.

Following his time at Leipzig University, Wagner became choir master at the theatre in Würzburg and completed his first opera, Die Feen (The Fairies). In 1836 Wagner married the leading lady of the opera house in Magdeburg while he held the position of musical director there. A move to Riga ensued when his wife Christine Wilhelmine "Minna" Planer left him for another man. Reunited in Riga, the couple worked up a large debt and fled to London and Paris.

Wagner was a socialist and was active amongst the German nationalists during his return to Germany. Wagner and his group of leftist supporters were involved in the May Uprising and as a result a warrant was issued for his arrest leading to a move to Zurich for the composer where he lived in exile for 12 years. During his time in Switzerland, Wagner had an affair with a married lady and his wife suffered from depression. Wagner found writing hard to undertake and survived mainly on a pension from friend Julie Ritter until his later years in Zurich during which he began work on his most famous operas - Die Walküre, Das Rheingold, Tristan und Isolde and the Ring Cycle.

In 1858 Minna discovered Wagner's affair and he left alone for Venice which was followed by a period in Paris. While in France, Wagner tried to rekindle his relationship with Minna without success. A few years later, the political ban on Wagner was lifted and he was free to return to Germany. In 1862 he moved to Biebrich in Prussia and an end was put to his marriage.

Wagner made a powerful friend of King Ludwig II in 1864 and his debts were cleared by the King. Thanks to encouragement and financial support from the King, Tristan und Isolde was premiered at the National Theatre in Munich in June 1865, the first premiere of a Wagner opera in almost 15 years. The conductor of the opera was Hans von Bülow whose wife, Cosima, was having an affair with Wagner. After the affair was made public Wagner was asked to leave Munich by King Ludwig II.

Minna, now estranged from Wagner, died in Dresden on 25th January 1866 leading to Cosima asking for a divorce from her husband to allow her to marry Wagner. Hans von Bülow consented in 1870 after Cosima had given birth to two further children by the composer. The couple married on 25th August 1870.

Following time in Bayreuth, Germany, where Wagner began a series of Bayreuth Festivals, the composer completed his final opera Parsifal despite being delayed by health issues. Wagner died during a family trip to Venice on 13th February 1883 at the age of 69. A funerary gondola took Wagner's body down the Grand Canal before it was sent to Bayreuth to be buried in the garden of Villa Wahnfried.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Improve This Page

If you’re the artist, management or record label, you can update your biography, photos, videos and more at Artist Central.

Get started at Artist Central

Feedback

Check out our Artist Stores FAQ
Send us feedback about this page