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Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money - That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! Paperback – 2000

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Product details

  • Paperback: 207 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown & Company (2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316857750
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316857758
  • Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 15.2 x 1.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (679 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 118,073 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Robert Kiyosaki, author of Rich Dad Poor Dad - the international runaway bestseller that has held a top spot on the New York Times bestsellers list for over six years - is an investor, entrepreneur and educator whose perspectives on money and investing fly in the face of conventional wisdom. He has, virtually single-handedly, challenged and changed the way tens of millions, around the world, think about money.In communicating his point of view on why 'old' advice - get a good job, save money, get out of debt, invest for the long term, and diversify - is 'bad' (both obsolete and flawed) advice, Robert has earned a reputation for straight talk, irreverence and courage.Rich Dad Poor Dad ranks as the longest-running bestseller on all four of the lists that report to Publisher's Weekly - The New York Times, Business Week, The Wall Street Journal and USA Today - and was named "USA Today's #1 Money Book" two years in a row. It is the third longest-running 'how-to' best seller of all time.Translated into 51 languages and available in 109 countries, the Rich Dad series has sold over 27 million copies worldwide and has dominated best sellers lists across Asia, Australia, South America, Mexico and Europe. In 2005, Robert was inducted into Amazon.com Hall of Fame as one of that bookseller's Top 25 Authors. There are currently 26 books in the Rich Dad series.In 2006 Robert teamed up with Donald Trump to co-author Why We Want You To Be Rich - Two Men - One Message. It debuted at #1 on The New York Times bestsellers list.Robert writes a bi-weekly column - 'Why the Rich Are Getting Richer' - for Yahoo! Finance and a monthly column titled 'Rich Returns' for Entrepreneur magazine.Prior to writing Rich Dad Poor Dad, Robert created the educational board game CASHFLOW 101 to teach individuals the financial and investment strategies that his rich dad spent years teaching him. It was those same strategies that allowed Robert to retire at age 47.Today there are more that 2,100 CASHFLOW Clubs - game groups independent of the Rich Dad Company - in cities throughout the world.Born and raised in Hawaii, Robert Kiyosaki is a fourth-generation Japanese-American. After graduating from college in New York, Robert joined the Marine Corps and served in Vietnam as an officer and helicopter gunship pilot. Following the war, Robert went to work in sales for Xerox Corporation and, in 1977, started a company that brought the first nylon and Velcro 'surfer wallets' to market. He founded an international education company in 1985 that taught business and investing to tens of thousands of students throughout the world. In 1994 Robert sold his business and, through his investments, was able to retire at the age of 47. During his short-lived retirement he wrote Rich Dad Poor Dad.

Product Description

A best seller for anyone ready to make a difference to their lives


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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

157 of 165 people found the following review helpful By Jim 8888 on 2 Jan. 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In order to enjoy this book, you'd best put your "capitalist pig" head on. The first sixty pages assume that the best thing you can do from the age of nine is apply yourself to making money. Play baseball? Baseball is for wimps. It's wasting precious time that you could be using applying your brain to thinking up money making schemes. It all started to irritate me, because there clearly is more to life than earning money - but then you wouldn't really be buying this book without wanting to earn a bit more dosh, would you? I'm glad I stuck with it, however, as he does temper this attitude as the book progresses.
You cannot argue with one Kiyosaki's opinions. Our (and the American) education system just does not teach you how to deal with personal finance. If it did, Barclaycard would be in receivership. Understand the value of a pound and make it work for you - it shouldn't be such a distasteful subject. Kiyosaki offers some basic common sense approaches that you could apply in order to make your money work better, but he often qualifies advice by stating the approach may not be right for you. Therefore step one could be Learn to Understand Yourself and Your Motivations. Once you've done that, apply your mind to making money if it interests and excites you. If it doesn't, fair enough. Perhaps the process will help you discover what actually does make you tick.
For those interested in making a stack, then the advice is again about learning. Choose who and what you learn from - teachers, friends, books, tapes, seminars. Look for new approaches. Find people who want to buy and sell something to them. Try to make your profit when you buy, not when you sell. Investigate stocks, real estate, whatever. Find people who can do a good job for you and reward them well.
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60 of 63 people found the following review helpful By M. Hayes on 22 Jan. 2007
Format: Paperback
The best thing about this book is that the central message is very clear. Rich people put their money into ASSETS (items which grow in value/ generate income - e.g. stocks, shares, real-estate), whereas worse-off people tend to spend money on LIABILITIES (things that either depreciate or cost money to maintain - e.g. cars, clothes.... and your own house). So far, so good. The non-rich also waste money by (a) unnecessarily paying too much tax and (b) running up debts on credit (he says its OK to buy the flashy car/ boat etc., but only AFTER you've made money from investing in assets).

However my problem is that the practical advice is very US-centred, in particular some of the tax-avoidance techniques he proposes which are simply NOT legal in the UK (e.g. putting your holiday down as a legitimate business expense if you own your own company... I wish!). I would welcome a UK version of the book. On balance the style is engaging if repetitive (as with many US self-help books). A useful way to start you thinking differently, but I would have liked some more specific recommendations on where to go/ what to do to get started with some of the investment ideas he suggests.
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82 of 90 people found the following review helpful By Baraniecki Mark Stuart on 12 Jun. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Sharon Lechter was introduced to Robert Kiyosaki by her husband, a patent lawyer. Koyosaki wanted to patent an educational game called "Cashflow" aimed at improving what he calls young peoples financial intelligence.
One thing leads to another and they eventually collaborated in producing this book which is essentially a financial biography of Kiyosaki. The Rich Dad, Poor Dad of the title are his real father, the superintendent of education for Hawaii (poor) and the businessman father of a schoolfriend (rich).

He says that at age 9 he decided to follow the advice of his rich dad and contrasts it with the advice of his poor dad throughout the book.

For example, poor dad says, "Love of money is the root of all evil", but rich dad says, "The lack of money is the root of all evil" and he follows rich dad, making the money but proving that his poor dad was right on the moral aspects.

Rich dad says, "The rich don't pay taxes, that's only for the poor and middle class", or Kiyosaki; "In real estate I make an offer with the words, "Subject to approval of my business partner" ...... and if they accept the offer and I don't want the deal I call my (non existent) business partner"

And rich dad again: He hugs a manageress in one of his shops and says that she is like a mother to him, then in the next breath gives a warning that "you'll wind up like Mrs Martin". He could have said that he respected her for her loyalty and good work but he clearly doesn't.
If Kiyosaki had been aboard the Titanic you would have found him hiding behind the women and children in the first life raft, but in non critical situations he has some useful things to say about financial management.

His idea that an asset is only an asset if it makes you money is a good one.
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84 of 93 people found the following review helpful By "grayhurley" on 28 Mar. 2002
Format: Paperback
I had heard about this book and decided to do some research of my own, sure enough there are about equal amounts of people who either like his views or see them as complete rubbish.
I find that the basis behind the book is good, the idea of "paying yourself first", not relying on your job to provide for you, buying assets that will make money rather than buying things that make more bills for you. This is surely common sense and Robert spends a long time on this. While he does go into detail, he spends an astonishing amount of time before he gets to the point.
The majority of this book centres around how he (supposedly) makes his money but I found it a bit unfair, unnerving almost, the way he went about it.
The book is written in a gloating fashion, "My assets bought me my porsche" I found this a bit like rubbing peoples faces in the fact he had a lot more money than we the readers (and the fact youve bought this book means your helping him buy the next one).
I like the way he explains the difference between incomings and outgoings in his diagrams, but again this book is written for an american audience so about 1/3 of his book will not apply here in good old blighty.
Some of his statements about education too I find disturbing, he almost recommends dropping out of school and learning about money in order to be better off. I find this irresponsible and dangerous. I certainly would not want my son to read any of this material.
If you, like me are looking at a way of clearing your debts and getting yourself steady in order to start saving or investing, there are better, simpler books on the market. My personal recommendations are: The Richest man in Babylon by George Clayson, or the Motley Fools "How to invest when you dont have any money" these are much better books geared more to our UK market and are more likely to help you on the way to a secure financial future.
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