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Rich Dad Poor Dad Paperback – 23 Jun 2011

4.3 out of 5 stars 779 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 178 pages
  • Publisher: Plata Publishing (23 Jun. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1612680003
  • ISBN-13: 978-1612680002
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.4 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (779 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 403 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Robert Kiyosaki, author of Rich Dad Poor Dad - the international runaway bestseller that has held a top spot on the New York Times bestsellers list for over six years - is an investor, entrepreneur and educator whose perspectives on money and investing fly in the face of conventional wisdom. He has, virtually single-handedly, challenged and changed the way tens of millions, around the world, think about money.In communicating his point of view on why 'old' advice - get a good job, save money, get out of debt, invest for the long term, and diversify - is 'bad' (both obsolete and flawed) advice, Robert has earned a reputation for straight talk, irreverence and courage.Rich Dad Poor Dad ranks as the longest-running bestseller on all four of the lists that report to Publisher's Weekly - The New York Times, Business Week, The Wall Street Journal and USA Today - and was named "USA Today's #1 Money Book" two years in a row. It is the third longest-running 'how-to' best seller of all time.Translated into 51 languages and available in 109 countries, the Rich Dad series has sold over 27 million copies worldwide and has dominated best sellers lists across Asia, Australia, South America, Mexico and Europe. In 2005, Robert was inducted into Amazon.com Hall of Fame as one of that bookseller's Top 25 Authors. There are currently 26 books in the Rich Dad series.In 2006 Robert teamed up with Donald Trump to co-author Why We Want You To Be Rich - Two Men - One Message. It debuted at #1 on The New York Times bestsellers list.Robert writes a bi-weekly column - 'Why the Rich Are Getting Richer' - for Yahoo! Finance and a monthly column titled 'Rich Returns' for Entrepreneur magazine.Prior to writing Rich Dad Poor Dad, Robert created the educational board game CASHFLOW 101 to teach individuals the financial and investment strategies that his rich dad spent years teaching him. It was those same strategies that allowed Robert to retire at age 47.Today there are more that 2,100 CASHFLOW Clubs - game groups independent of the Rich Dad Company - in cities throughout the world.Born and raised in Hawaii, Robert Kiyosaki is a fourth-generation Japanese-American. After graduating from college in New York, Robert joined the Marine Corps and served in Vietnam as an officer and helicopter gunship pilot. Following the war, Robert went to work in sales for Xerox Corporation and, in 1977, started a company that brought the first nylon and Velcro 'surfer wallets' to market. He founded an international education company in 1985 that taught business and investing to tens of thousands of students throughout the world. In 1994 Robert sold his business and, through his investments, was able to retire at the age of 47. During his short-lived retirement he wrote Rich Dad Poor Dad.

Product Description

Amazon Review

Personal finance author and lecturer Robert Kiyosaki developed his unique economic perspective through exposure to a pair of disparate influences: his own highly educated, but fiscally unstable father, and the multimillionaire eighth-grade dropout father of his closest friend. The lifelong monetary problems experienced by his "poor dad" (whose weekly paychecks, while respectable, were never quite sufficient to meet family needs) pounded home the counterpoint communicated by his "rich dad" (that "the poor and the middle class work for money," but "the rich have money work for them"). Taking that message to heart, Kiyosaki was able to retire at 47. Rich Dad Poor Dad, written with consultant and CPA Sharon L. Lechter, lays out his the philosophy behind his relationship with money. Although Kiyosaki can take a frustratingly long time to make his points, his book is nonetheless a compelling advocate for the type of "financial literacy" that's never taught in schools. Based on the principle that income-generating assets always provide healthier bottom-line results than even the best of traditional jobs, it explains how the former might be acquired so that the latter eventually can be shed. --Howard Rothman, Amazon.com --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

RICH DAD, POOR DAD is a starting point for anyone looking to gain control of their financial future (USA TODAY)

Robert Kiyosaki's work in education is powerful, profound, and life changing. I salute his efforts and recommend him highly (Anthony Robbins) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In order to enjoy this book, you'd best put your "capitalist pig" head on. The first sixty pages assume that the best thing you can do from the age of nine is apply yourself to making money. Play baseball? Baseball is for wimps. It's wasting precious time that you could be using applying your brain to thinking up money making schemes. It all started to irritate me, because there clearly is more to life than earning money - but then you wouldn't really be buying this book without wanting to earn a bit more dosh, would you? I'm glad I stuck with it, however, as he does temper this attitude as the book progresses.
You cannot argue with one Kiyosaki's opinions. Our (and the American) education system just does not teach you how to deal with personal finance. If it did, Barclaycard would be in receivership. Understand the value of a pound and make it work for you - it shouldn't be such a distasteful subject. Kiyosaki offers some basic common sense approaches that you could apply in order to make your money work better, but he often qualifies advice by stating the approach may not be right for you. Therefore step one could be Learn to Understand Yourself and Your Motivations. Once you've done that, apply your mind to making money if it interests and excites you. If it doesn't, fair enough. Perhaps the process will help you discover what actually does make you tick.
For those interested in making a stack, then the advice is again about learning. Choose who and what you learn from - teachers, friends, books, tapes, seminars. Look for new approaches. Find people who want to buy and sell something to them. Try to make your profit when you buy, not when you sell. Investigate stocks, real estate, whatever. Find people who can do a good job for you and reward them well.
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Format: Paperback
The best thing about this book is that the central message is very clear. Rich people put their money into ASSETS (items which grow in value/ generate income - e.g. stocks, shares, real-estate), whereas worse-off people tend to spend money on LIABILITIES (things that either depreciate or cost money to maintain - e.g. cars, clothes.... and your own house). So far, so good. The non-rich also waste money by (a) unnecessarily paying too much tax and (b) running up debts on credit (he says its OK to buy the flashy car/ boat etc., but only AFTER you've made money from investing in assets).

However my problem is that the practical advice is very US-centred, in particular some of the tax-avoidance techniques he proposes which are simply NOT legal in the UK (e.g. putting your holiday down as a legitimate business expense if you own your own company... I wish!). I would welcome a UK version of the book. On balance the style is engaging if repetitive (as with many US self-help books). A useful way to start you thinking differently, but I would have liked some more specific recommendations on where to go/ what to do to get started with some of the investment ideas he suggests.
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Format: Paperback
This book is a valuable read for anyone interested in escaping from the 'rat race'. Rather that offer a manual of techniques the author tries to encourage readers to seek financial intelligence. He points out that the education system is lacking when it comes to teaching students how to manage money and illustrates the benefits of taking the time to learn about basic accounting terms.
The author goes on to discuss the mindset and mentality of the rich and what sets them apart from the 'poor and middle class'. He also explains that the best money-making tool we have is our mind and suggests that we need to train our brain to spot opportunuties that would normally pass us by. He clearly shows why the rat race exists and encourages the reader to make changes which will break the 'work-earn-pay' cycle.
The book is written in the form of a story of the author's childhood. It is very easy to read and you don't need to be a financial wizard to understand the theories. There are a few example of the author's dealings which require a little more attention. This may be partly due to the author's American origins and the reference to the American financial and tax systems.
You will not get quick rich from buying this book but it might just change your life. It's certainly changed my attitude towards my financial affairs and has encouraged me to pay much more attention to the financial implications of my lifestyle. Many of the suggestions appear to be common sense but I know from expensive experience that the easiest answers are sometimes the hardest to find.
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Format: Paperback
Robert Kiyosaki has produced a very readable book explaining many of the fundamental differences between wealthy and poor people. He makes very good use of repetition to ensure that his points are firmly `sent home'. Although this can be annoying at times, particularly when concepts are already familiar to the reader, it's easy to skip over the repetition and move on to the new concepts.

It is a simple book to read, and requires no particular financial or academic background. However, the concepts introduced are very powerful, and, if taken to heart, life changing. The book traces the author's life from the age of 9, comparing the financial teaching that he received from his own, highly academically intelligent, real dad, and that of his friend's, financially intelligent, dad. Having experienced first hand the teaching and upbringing resulting from both of the dads, he is able to reflect on how they differ and how these differences have a profound effect on financial wealth.

The book is written from an American perspective, but the concepts and ideas are universally applicable, certainly in all Western societies. It explains how the poor and middle-class pay much more in taxes than the rich and how most people, including many of our advisors, do not understand the difference between assets and liabilities. He makes good use of simple diagrams to explain the relationship between income, expenditure, assets and liabilities.

RK firmly believes in education, but also believes that the education system does not teach financial intelligence.
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