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Rich Dad, Poor Dad 2: Cash Flow Quadrant - Rich Dad's Guide to Financial Freedom [Paperback]

Robert T. Kiyosaki
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (94 customer reviews)

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Book Description

5 Dec 2002 Rich Dad
THE CASHFLOW QUADRANT will reveal why some people work less, earn more, pay less in taxes, and feel more financially secure than others. It is simply a matter of knowing which quadrant to work from and when. Have you ever wondered: * What the difference is between an employee and a business owner? * Why some investors make money with little risk while most other investors just break even? * Why in the Industrial Age most parents wanted their children to become medical doctors, accountants or attorneys...and why in the Information Age those professions are under financial attack? Have you noticed that many of the brightest graduates from our universities want to work for college dropouts...dropouts such as Bill Gates of Microsoft, Richard Branson of Virgin Industries, Michael Dell of Dell Computers, Ted Turner of CNN? Dropouts who today are the mega-rich of society. This book will answer some of these questions and also assist in guiding you in finding your own path to financial freedom in a world of ever increasing financial change.


Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Sphere; New edition edition (5 Dec 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0751532800
  • ISBN-13: 978-0751532807
  • Product Dimensions: 19.4 x 12.6 x 2.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (94 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 280,691 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Robert T. Kiyosaki co-founded an international education company, teaching business to graduates. Now retired, Robert does what he enjoys most.he invests. Sharon L. Lechter is a consultant to the toy and publishing industries, and a business owner

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
114 of 116 people found the following review helpful
By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAME TOP 500 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Paperback
Repetition is the source of mastery, and The Cash Flow Quadrant takes the excellent thinking in Rich Dad, Poor Dad and builds to another level of detail. This information will increase what you learned in Rich Dad, Poor Dad and help you begin the transformation from a salaried or self-employed person into a business owner and investor.
The definitions of these four quadrants are important. As an employee, you have a job. As a self-employed person, you own a job. As a business owner you have a system (such as a franchise like McDonald's) that produces cash flow for you and others work for you. As an investor, your money works for you. Rich people are getting more than 70 percent of their cash flow and income by having money work for them.
One of the strengths of the book is that it deals with the subtle psychological differences among people in the four different quadrants, especially on subjects like security and freedom. Kiyosaki and Lechter then do a nice job of helping you understand the difference between risky and taking risk. The latter is a good idea, when you know what you are doing, and the former is always to be avoided.
The book is not dogmatic, pointing out that good results can be reached in a variety of ways. You have to decide which ones are right for you. In general, you are encouraged to move from the employee and self-employed side for your income to the business owner and investor side. Then, take your cash flow and expand it into investments.
Another of the strengths of the book is to make it clearer what the advantages of income property are. In these Internet stock-crazed days, many are looking only to stocks and missing good commercial property opportunities.
Read more ›
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you want more money, read this book 27 Feb 2001
By Nuvolau
Format:Paperback
A fine book that changes the way you think about money. The text can get a little repetetive at times, but don't let that put you off. There's a lot more meat in this book than in his previous offerring, 'Rich Dad, Poor Dad'.
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This is no 'get rich quick manual', and is all the better for it - but it will shift the paradigms of what has become, for most of us, the conventional view of work and money. Written in a similar style to the 'one minute manager' series of books is perhaps the only downside of this wonderful volume. The message is essentially simple and illustrated well by examples and diagrams. If you want to become finacially free and actually have your money work for YOU and not the bank, mortgage lender, or tax-man then invest in buying the book and the time to read it. Then begin the journey to financial freedom. The important points are periodically repeated so as to re-affirm the knowledge, which I think is good for any reader at any level. There are 'get out clauses' that allow the reader to finish the book early if they don't think the philosophy will suit them and so not waste their time. I challenge any one to put the book the book down before the last page!
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A glum yet inspiring read. 18 Dec 2006
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Having enjoyed Rich Dad, Poor Dad in a depressing yet inspiring way, I was anxious to read this book. I was not disappointed, although finished feeling glum yet inspired. It is a strange combination. I suppose it arises from reading about the fate of the employed and self-employed as opposed to the opportunities that beckon those who aspire to run a business or invest.

However, there are seven steps outlined to help the would-be wealthy. These are most interesting and practical. By the end of the book I started to feel a lot better, because as a result of his first book I had already made some progress. Worth reading, but be prepared for some glumness.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAME TOP 500 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Paperback
Repetition is the source of mastery, and The Cash Flow Quadrant takes the excellent thinking in Rich Dad, Poor Dad and builds to another level of detail. This information will increase what you learned in Rich Dad, Poor Dad and help you begin the transformation from a salaried or self-employed person into a business owner and investor.
The definitions of these four quadrants are important. As an employee, you have a job. As a self-employed person, you own a job. As a business owner you have a system (such as a franchise like McDonald's) that produces cash flow for you and others work for you. As an investor, your money works for you. Rich people are getting more than 70 percent of their cash flow and income by having money work for them.
One of the strengths of the book is that it deals with the subtle psychological differences among people in the four different quadrants, especially on subjects like security and freedom. Kiyosaki and Lechter then do a nice job of helping you understand the difference between risky and taking risk. The latter is a good idea, when you know what you are doing, and the former is always to be avoided.
The book is not dogmatic, pointing out that good results can be reached in a variety of ways. You have to decide which ones are right for you. In general, you are encouraged to move from the employee and self-employed side for your income to the business owner and investor side. Then, take your cash flow and expand it into investments.
Another of the strengths of the book is to make it clearer what the advantages of income property are. In these home-purchasing crazed days, many are looking only to buy homes and missing good commercial property opportunities.
Read more ›
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars A good follow up to Rich dad poor dad - my review 7 years on!
Excellent follow up to Rich dad poor dad, follow the balance sheets visit the site, step by step little by little you will become better off, i first read this some 7 years ago and... Read more
Published 21 days ago by sharkstooth321
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Great book.
Published 1 month ago by GREEN GUY
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
It give idea but it does not seem easy as it is
Published 1 month ago by Maguy Kikumbi Kodi
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
must read it to the end makes you think
Published 2 months ago by Brian419
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent sequel to RICH DAD POOR DAD
The book consists of three parts. First there is a theory section where the classification of people into employed (e), self-employed (s), business owners (b) and investors (i) is... Read more
Published 5 months ago by A reader
5.0 out of 5 stars Read it! And all the others!
No nonsense, this book (and the 1st one) changed the way I look at money! Buy it, borrow it, whatever, but read it. Read more
Published 6 months ago by Sabaq
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly inspiring
This book was a life changer for me.

If you are serious about getting out of the rat race, this is a beacon of light. Read more
Published 6 months ago by Ziad R.
2.0 out of 5 stars Average and very US centric
I read Rich Dad, Poor Dad a few years ago and I enjoyed it. This book contains the same concepts in a different format. Read more
Published 7 months ago by Culture Enthusiast
4.0 out of 5 stars Rich Dad, Poor Dad 2
I enjoyed this book, I read the first book and loved it. This takes it several steps further, actually giving you the tools.
Published 8 months ago by T.C "Freethinker"
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
awesome (Y)
Published 8 months ago by Vydunas
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