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Revolt
 
 

Revolt [Kindle Edition]

Qaisra Shahraz
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)

Print List Price: £11.99
Kindle Price: £1.09 includes VAT* & free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
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Product Description

Review

'Gripping, hugely involving and very satisfying to read' --Kate Mosse

A real story-telling gift --Sue Gee

'A colourful, engrossing portrayal of a world where love tears families apart' --Gill Paul, author of THE AFFAIR

Product Description

A brilliantly incisive portrait of small-town life, exploding into a panoramic portrayal of the nature of change, freedom, pride and prejudice. Evocative, family drama and love story, rich with contemporary issues, humour, tragedy and conflict. Think Pakistani Jane Austen!

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 627 KB
  • Print Length: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Arcadia Books (1 Sep 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00DAJ6MH8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #8,242 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Qaisra Shahraz

Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, Qaisra Shahraz is a prize-winning and critically acclaimed novelist and scriptwriter. Born in Pakistan, she has lived in Manchester (UK) since childhood and gained two Masters Degrees in English and European literature and scriptwriting. Being a highly successful and achieving woman on an international scale, Qaisra was recognised as being one of 100 influential Pakistani women in Pakistan Power 100 List (2012). Previously she was nominated for the Asian Women of Achievement Awards and for the Muslim News Awards for Excellence.

Her novels, The Holy Woman and Typhoon, are translated into several languages. The Holy Woman (2001) won the Golden Jubilee Award, was the 'Best Book of the Month' for Waterstones and has become a bestseller in Indonesia and Turkey. She has appeared in many international writers' festivals and book fairs including in Abu Dhabi, Jaipur and Beijing. Her award-winning drama serial Dil Hee To Hai was broadcast on Pakistani Television in 2003. Qaisra has recently completed a third novel Revolt, two volumes of short stories: A Pair of Jeans and Train to Krakow; she is now working on her fourth novel The Henna Painter. Several of her prize-winning short stories are published in the UK and abroad. Her work is being studied in schools and Universities. A critical analysis of her works has been done in a book entitled The Holy and the Unholy: Critical Essays on Qaisra Shahraz's Fiction (2011. Qaisra Shahraz has another successful career in education, as a consultant, teacher trainer and inspector.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book had me gripped from the first page. 28 Oct 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
It is a multi-faceted, multi-layed story of love and loss, finding and loosing. Centreing on the forthcoming wedding of two rich cousins the action moves from Pakistan to England and back again. However the families in their grand houses have problems no amount of money can solve. A daughter lost by an impulsive marriage, an aunt who pines for a lost love and a bridegroom who has the biggest problem of them all. Underpinning the action is always the need to resolve the tension caused by conflict between traditional Pakistani Muslim values and modern Western ones

The families in the big houses are supported by a fascinating cast of villagers: Begum, the housekeeper, Zeinab, the quilt maker, Rukhsar, the goldsmith‘s wife and especially Masi Fiza, the laundry woman and purveyor of juicy gossip ,who always manages to be where the action is. Qaisra’s cast of characters keeps us enthalled as the action unfolds and the tensions between them all play out and are finally resolved.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another masterpiece! 25 Oct 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I first read the perennial favourite The Holy Woman almost a decade ago, so turned to Revolt with some trepidation. Could the author live up to a decade of built up expectation and match her first novel? Luckily for me (and anyone else reading her work), Revolt delivers.
What the author does so well is to create characters that are emotionally rich and believable. This is especially pertinent when you finish the novel, there is a burning desire to know what happened next to the characters.
Revolt itself is a multi-layered story about human relationships, set in Pakistan, but with universal themes of love, betrayal, sacrifice. The author keeps the polemics of that country at bay, mentioned when needed, but done in a way I imagine most people think about these issues. But most of all the story is a page turner, and kept me gripped throughout.
Revolt also incorporates the ongoing struggle between Pakistan and NRPs (non-resident Pakistanis), and really shows how lives whether in England, America or Pakistan, are sometimes only separated by a whisper.
I won't give away any spoilers, just to say the focus on the lives of the three sisters, Gulbahar, Mehreen and Rani, is very refreshing. Why shouldn't women of a certain age take centre stage, and why shouldn't they be allowed to inhabit realms of feeling? The power play is also very subtly done, and none of them is ever meek or ignored, contrary to popular opinion of Muslim women.
The flip side is also evident though, and a daughter's choices are less acceptable than a son's, but again done subtly.
The real story that moved me though was that of Rani. Stick with this character because you will be rewarded for doing so by the author, who is bold and courageous in how she deals with Rani's story.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absorbing and beautiful 14 Feb 2014
By LondonS
Format:Paperback
Wow, where do I start with this lovely, long novel? Complicated and large in scope, Qaisra Shahraz’s Revolt had me hooked and drawn into the plight of a large family in the rural village of Gulistan in Pakistan. Centred around three sisters, Rani, Mehreen and Gulbahar, and their children and servants, Revolt chronicles the twists and turns of marriages and secret loves, and the ripple effect the choices of the children have on their mothers and fathers and the rest of the village.

I’m not going to lie, Revolt is greatly complicated and there’s a large list of characters. At the start, I had a hard time keeping track of who was who but once I finally got into the swing of it, keeping tabs on relationships between different characters became easier. There were also some tough themes to deal with in this book, like women’s rights, family values and tradition, and as a Western woman I found some of these issues to be frustrating, particularly the issue of arranged marriages.

Shahraz’s writing is very rich and warm, sprinkling words and phrases in the native tongue throughout the book. Don’t let the foreign language put you off; there is a glossary in the back of the book to help with translations!

This was one of those books that I read slowly, pausing in my reading to put the book down and actually reflect on what I’d read. I think I might have even had a dream or two about the characters -it’s that realistic and affecting. I really didn’t want the book to end. I didn’t want to close the cover on Gulbahar, Mehreen and Rani. This book was just rich – in setting, in characters, in everything. There’s no other word to describe this book.

If you’re looking for a total cultural immersion, Revolt is definitely the perfect book for that. I also have Shahraz’s The Holy Woman on my shelf to read and I’m greatly looking forward to it.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant evocation of village life in Pakistan 17 Nov 2013
Format:Paperback
Quaisra Shiraz has created some memorable characters in her most recent novel, "Revolt". Her pen presents such a vivid picture of village life that you feel as if you are living there and engaging with the characters, who come from many and varied stations in life. Shiraz is particularly strong in defining how individual decisions can affect wider cultural attitudes, and the message of cross-cultural tolerance is very welcome in this age of globalisation. But most importantly, the book is full of page-turning excitement deftly plotted, and you are likely to miss the depiction of a world unfamiliar to many readers, drawn with particular sympathy for the lives of the village women, when this engaging book comes to an end.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Revolt is a Must-Read
Qaisra Shahraz brings you into a world that you have most likely never visited or known. She sets up photographic shots of details that morph open into cinematic scenes: you can... Read more
Published 7 days ago by leanne de cerbo
3.0 out of 5 stars I think I quite enjoyed it at the time of reading
I cannot remember too much about it which shows me I was not completely enthralled. I think I quite enjoyed it at the time of reading.
Published 13 days ago by jane grace
5.0 out of 5 stars Shockingly good
This was the first novel I read by Quaisra Shahraz and was blown away by the sheer pleasure of reading about the lives of these people so removed from my experiences. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Mrs. J. Owen
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved this book
I cannot find anything to say that's negative about this enjoyable book. The story was wonderful,written so well,I was lost from the first page. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Mercia Wardle
5.0 out of 5 stars Once again brilliant
I have now read all apart from 'A pair of jeans' which is my next read. All three books I have read are fabulous and give a real insight of the lives of the characters. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Suegs
5.0 out of 5 stars House of the Spirits, Pakistani village style!
Revolt by Qaisra Shahraz
Arcadia Books
978-0-9573304-9-8
Submitted by the publisher
£11. Read more
Published 3 months ago by Texasbooklover
5.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing and rich story
This review was first published at M's Bookshelf - http://mssbookshelf.blogspot.be

Wow. What a novel.
It took me a while to get into the story. Read more
Published 3 months ago by Maryline -M's Bookshelf
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant read
Yet another beautiful story loved the flow of the story line and the characters all had their own way to overcome their problems.
Published 3 months ago by Nadia
2.0 out of 5 stars A Pakistani Aga saga
Like another reviewer I was very disappointed by this book. Having seen the author's profile and connection with the British Council, and read the reviews, I was expecting... Read more
Published 3 months ago by Marand
1.0 out of 5 stars Melodrama
This saga set in Pakistan has little to commend it. It is full of petty, narrow minded characters who like to gossip & enjoy others misfortune. Read more
Published 3 months ago by DocE
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